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Lesson Note on Biology
CELL STRUCTURE

Ultrastructure of animal cell and plant cell

Subject: Biology

Theme: Cell Structure and Specialization

Topic: Cell structure

Sub Topic: Ultrastructure of Animal Cell and Plant Cell.

Date: dd/mm/yyyy

Class: S.S.S 1

Duration: 30 Minutes

No of Learners: 30

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
  1. Defined a cell and Cytology.

    A Cell is the basic unit of life. All living organisms are made up of cells.
    Cytology is the study of the structure and function of cells.
  2. State cell theory and list the main principles of cell theory.

    1. The cell theory states that all living organisms are made up of cells, and cells are the basic unit of structure-function in all living organisms.
    2. The main principles of cell theory are based on the following ideas.
      1. All known living organisms are made up of one or more cells.
      2. All cells come from pre-existing cells by division.
      3. Cells contain the hereditary information that is passed from cell to cell during cell division.
      4. Metabolism takes place in cells.
      5. Given suitable conditions, cells are capable of independent existence.
  3. Draw and label the ultra-structure of a cell.

    Ultrastructure is the detail of the cell as revealed by the electron microscope. Animal cell



    Plant cell


  4. List the similarities between animal cells and plant cells.

    1. Both have a cell membrane, a cytoplasm and a nucleus.
    2. Both animal and plant cells have mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, Reticulum endoplasmic, lysosome, big ribosomes (the 80S), peroxisome, microtubules.
  5. List the differences between animal and plant cells.


    FEATURE ANIMAL CELL PLANT CELL
    Shape Ovoid or spherical Polygon
    Plastids Absent Present
    Centrioles Present Absent
    Vacuole Small or absent Big with a tonoplast
    Cell wall Absent Present
    Microvilli Present Absent
    Plasmodesmata Absent Present
  6. List the classification of the living organism.

    1. Unicellular organisms are made of only one cell, such as Bacteria, Yeast, Ameoba, Paramecium etc.
    2. Multicellular organisms are animals and plants composed of many cells. In multicellular organisms, cells divide and then undergo differentiation or specialisation for specific functions.

Rationale:

You may know of someone who has been ill with a disease or disorder such as meningitis, malaria, diabetes, a type of cancer, cystic fibrosis, or Alzheimer’s disease. All these diseases and disorders are caused by problems at a cell or molecular level. Physical damage such as a burn or broken bone also causes damage at the cell level.
Biotechnology uses techniques and information from cell biology to genetically modify crops to produce alternative characteristics; to clone plants and animals; to produce and ensure high-quality food is available at lower costs; to produce purer medicines and in time organs for the many people who need transplants. It is therefore important to teach the learners' cell structure of plants and animals.

Prerequisite/ Previous knowledge:

The learners have learnt about the microscope.

Learning Materials:

Microscopes, micrographs, pens and

Reference Materials:

  1. Kent M. (2000). Advanced Biology. Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK.
  2. Campbell, N.A, et al. (2008). Biology, Pearson International Edition, San Francisco, USA, 8th edition.
  3. Pete K. Frank S. (2008). OCR Biology. Pearson Education Limited. British.
  4. Miller, Levine (2008). Prentice-Hall Biology. Pearson Education. The USA.

Lesson Development:

STAGE
TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
LEARNING POINTS
INTRODUCTION
full class session (10 mins)
Asking some questions:
  1. What is the function of a microscope?
  2. Which are the most common microscopes use today?
  3. State the advantages of the electron microscope over the light microscope
  4. List some disadvantages of the electron microscope.
Learners' expected response.
  • A microscope is used to produce a magnified image of an object or specimen.
  • The most commonly used today are the compound light microscope (optical microscope) and the electron microscope.
  • The electron microscope has a higher resolution and is, therefore, able of a higher effective magnification estimated at up to 250,000 million times compared to the light microscope which can show a useful magnification only up to 1000-2000 times. This is because a light microscope uses a beam of light with a longer wavelength while Electron microscopes use a beam of electrons that have a short wavelength.
    1. They are extremely expensive and the maintenance costs are high.
    2. Sample preparation is often much more technical requiring special training.
    3. Samples must be dead, exposed to high radiation and are placed in a vacuum so that it is impossible to observe living specimens
    4. It is not possible to observe colours because electrons do not possess a colour. The image is only black-white, even if sometimes the image is coloured artificially to give a better visual impression.
    5. They require more training and experience in identifying artefacts that may have been introduced during the sample preparation process.
Learner’s entry points.
Competences: Critical thinking, Communication.
STEP 1
10 mins.
Development
Ask students to form three groups. Form three groups and share responsibility. Inculcating leadership skills, competitive spirit, cooperation, teamwork and a sense of responsibility among learners.
Teacher to provide learners with materials (microscopes and prepared micrographs or diagrams containing the structures of different animal cells and plant cells) and instructions and allow them to identify the materials


The teacher should thereafter guide learners to define cell, cytology, state cell theory and list the classification of a living organism.
Students take materials needed for this activity, identify the materials as microscopes, micrographs or diagrams containing the structures of animal cells and plant cells.

Hence define cell and cytology A Cell is the basic unit of life.
Cytology is the study of the structure and function of cells.
Being able to identify the materials/apparatus.
Competences: Problem-solving, communication, manipulation, cooperation and Critical thinking.
The teacher goes round to give further instructions to learners in the group where necessary.



Monitor how the students are progressing towards the knowledge, skills and attitudes to be learned and boost those who are still behind (but without communicating to them the knowledge).
The students follow the teacher's directives.
Students work collaboratively on the task. Both boys and girls participate actively. Observe the chart given for the Ultrastructure of a cell and identify parts that are easily recognizable when compared with a photomicrograph from a light microscope.
Cross-cutting issue: Peace and value, Financial education
STEP 4
presentation of findings (10 mins)
Invite representatives of groups to presents their findings.


The teacher should guide the learners with the names of each segment of the cell.
Representatives of groups to presents their findings.
Others follow the presentation.


The learners are to identify each segment of the cell while the teacher should guide the learners with the names.
  1. animal cell
  2. Plant cell

Communication.
STEP 5 Exploitation of students findings
5 mins
Ask students to share their observations on micrographs/ diagrams in groups.


The teacher informs the learners that these observations are the main principles of cell theory, and thereafter, guide learners to state the cell theory.
Students share their observations.
  1. All known living organisms are made up of one or more cells.
  2. All cells come from pre-existing cells by division.
  3. Cells contain the hereditary information that is passed from cell to cell during cell division.
  4. Metabolism takes place in cells.
  5. Given suitable conditions, cells are capable of independent existence.
Collaboration among group members, manipulation of results and observing the principles of cell theory.
EVALUATION
10 mins
The teacher asks the students questions. From your observations:
  1. list the similarity between animal cells and plant cells.
  2. list the differences between animal and plant cells.
    1. Both have a cell membrane, a cytoplasm and a nucleus.
    2. Both animal and plant cells have mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, Reticulum endoplasmic, lysosome, big ribosomes (the 80S), peroxisome, microtubules.
  1. FEATURE ANIMAL CELL PLANT CELL
    Shape Ovoid or spherical Polygon
    Plastids Absent Present
    Centrioles Present Absent
    Vacuole Small or absent Big with a tonoplast
    Cell wall Absent Present
    Microvilli Present Absent
    Plasmodesmata Absent Present
Asking the learners questions to assess the achievement of the set objectives.
CONCLUSION
2 mins
Teachers wrap up from the learners' observations,
summarise the learned knowledge, and give more clarification on the learned content.
Participate actively in summarizing the content.
Making short notes.
Listening skills, Writing skills.
Assessment/ Assignment:
5 mins
The teachers give learners a take home and engage students to work individually.
  1. What are cells and cytology?
  2. State the cell theory and list five principles of cell theory.
  3. Draw and label the animal and plant cells.
Do exercises. Competences: Creativity.

Lesson Plan On Basic Technology

Woodwork Hand Tools

Subject: Basic Technology

Theme: Woodwork Hand Tools

Topic: Tools and Objects Production.

Sub Topic: Carpentry tools.

Date: dd/mm/yyyy

Class: Basic 6

Duration: 35 Minutes

No of Learners: 30

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
  1. Say what carpentry means.

    Carpentry is the art of making wooden products.
  2. Say what carpentry tools are.

    A tool is a handheld device used to carry out a particular function. Carpenters use carpentry tools to make wooden products.
  3. List usage and maintenance of some carpentry tools

    1. carprntry tools

    1. Workbench: It is a surface on which a carpenter does her or his work. Work that can be done on it includes smoothing wood, cutting, measuring and making joints on wood.
      Such as:
      • Placing a piece of wood on the workbench and cut it into two using a saw.
      • Smoothen one part of the wood on the workbench.
        Maintenance of a Workbench:
      • Remove all the tools that are not in use from the workbench. Wipe the bench and check if that is firm and stable.
    2. Saw: There are various types of saws. Examples are: Table saw, bow saw and wood saw.
      • Bow saw: This is also known as a frame saw or bucksaw. It is used to make straight and curved cuts on wood.
      • Table saw: It is made up of a circular blade that is moved by an electric motor. The blade is held in place by a table or bend. It is used to cut a block of wood into small pieces.
      • Wood saw: It is commonly called the handsaw. It is used to cut pieces of wood into different shapes and sizes.
        Maintenance of a Saw:
      • Check if the hand saw blade is sharp, if it does not sharpen it using a file. Check if the handle is in good condition.
      • After using the saws remove pieces of wood shaving stuck on the blade using a stick.
    3. T-square: It is used for drawing and measuring right-angled objects.
      Maintenance of a T-square:
      • Clean the parts to remove dust and sawdust. Store the T-square safely after use.
      • Apply oil on the metallic parts of the T-square to prevent rusting.
    4. Claw hammer: It is used for driving nails in wood and also for pulling it out.
      Maintenance of a Claw hammer:
      • Store the hammer in a dry and safe place after use.
    5. Plane: It is used for smoothing wood to give smooth and shiny surfaces. Examples of planes are: Jointer plane, Smoothing plane and Jack plane.
      Maintenance of a Plane:
      • Adjust the blade to the desired angle. Oil the plane.
      • Store the plane in a dry and safe place after use.
    6. Axe: An axe is used for splitting and cutting wood. It is also used for cutting down trees and uprooting stumps.
      Maintenance of an Axe:
      • Look at the blade of the axe. Is it sharp?
        • Sharpen blunt cutting edges of the axe.
        • Replace the worn-out blades with new ones.
        • Ensure the axe is firmly fixed to the handle.
      • Clean the blade and store the axe in a clean dry place.
    7. Screwdriver: It is used to drive screws in wood. It is also used to remove screws out of wood.
      Maintenance of a Screwdriver:
      • Ensure the tip of the screwdriver is not damaged. Replace broken or worn-out handles.
      • Clean the screwdriver and store the axe in a clean dry place.
    8. Brace: The brace is used for boring holes in wood. Force is applied on top and the handle rotated with one hand.
      Maintenance of a Brace:
      • Ensure that the handle and the head of the brace are well fixed.
      • Ensure that the cutting tip of the brace is sharp.
      • Clean and store the brace in a clean and dry place.
    9. Clamp/ Jointer: A clamp is used to hold together pieces of wood to be glued. It also holds together the glued parts until the glue is dry and the pieces of wood are firmly jointed.
      Maintenance of a Clamp/ Jointer:
      • Check and ensure the screw and other moving parts of the clamp are oiled and functioning well.
      • Blow out dirt from the joints of the clamp and wipe it with a moist piece of cloth.
      • Clean and store the Clamp/ Jointer in a clean and dry place.
    10. Spirit level: It is used to check if the wood surface is horizontal or vertical. The spirit level is placed on a wooden surface, then the position of the bubble in the viewing point is noted. Hold the spirit level firmly when using it. Do not let it drop on a hard surface because it can easily break.
      Maintenance of a Spirit level:
      • Wipe the surface of the spirit level to remove dust and dirt from it.

Rationale:

Carpentry tools are used by carpenters to make furniture. In our homes, we have different pieces of furniture. Carpentry tools need to be used and maintained the property as they are the source of livelihood to many. Carpentry is also a source of revenue for our country. This lesson will encourage learners to use and maintain common carpentry tools.

Prerequisite/ Previous or Assumed knowledge:

Learners know of wooden/ furniture products such as Chair, Table, Shelf, Bed, Desk etc

Learning Materials:

Carpentry tools, Charts, Pictures, Textbooks

Reference Materials:

Basic Technology Book 1 by R. Abu et al.
Online resouces.

Lesson Development:

STAGE
TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
LEARNING POINTS
INTRODUCTION
full class session (5mins)
The teacher asks the learners to name some furniture objects at home, offices, school, etc. Learners expected to respond.
Chairs, Tables, Beds, and Cupboards, Desk, kitchen cabinets and bookcases etc.
Confirming the previous lesson.
DEVELOPMENT Step 1
full class session (5 mins)
The teacher asks the learners, who made these furniture tools listed in the learner's activities above and with what material were they made. Learners expected to respond.
The tools were made by the carpenters and are made of wood.
Developing the concept of carpentry.
DEVELOPMENT Step 2. Group Work (2 mins) The teacher guides the learners to form four groups and ask them to choose their leaders and secretaries. Learners choose their group leaders and secretaries. Inculcating leadership skills, competitive spirit, cooperation, teamwork and a sense of responsibility among learners.
Step 3 Full class session (7 mins) The teacher asks learners in a group, what profession of persons make use of the tools display at the board/ ground or screen as the case may be (if the school has live carpentry tools the teacher should bring them out from the store for the learners to examine and identify).

The teacher should also ask and guide the learners to names each of the tools.
  1. carprntry tools
Learners expected response;
The tools are used by the carpenters.

The tools are: Spirit level, Brace, Clamp, Claw hammer, screwdriver, T-square, Plane, Saw, Word bench, chisel, tap, etc.
Introducing the topic Carpentry tools.
The teacher writes the topic on the board and asks learners to define carpentry and what carpentry tools are in their own words Learners expected to respond;
Carpentry is the art of making wooden products.

Carpenters use carpentry tools to make wooden products.
Meaning of carpentry and carpentry tools.
Stage 4
Full class discussion (10 mins)
The teacher asks the learners in a group study the pictures on the board and explains how the tools in the pictures are used by the carpenters.

If the school has a carpentry workshop, the teacher should take the learners to the workshop and guide learners to perform the following activities with the use of the carpentry tools.

  1. Remove all the tools that are not in use from the workbench. Wipe the bench and check if that is firm and stable.
  2. Place a piece of wood on the workbench and cut it into two using a saw.
  3. Check if the hand saw blade is sharp, if it does not sharpen it using a file. Check if the handle is in good condition.
  4. Hold a piece of timber and cut it using a hand saw.
  5. Cut another piece of wood using a bow saw.
  6. Place a T-square on a block of wood.
  7. Draw a straight line on the wood along the length and width of the T-square.
  8. Measure the angle formed and write down your answer.
  9. Ensure that the claw hammer handle is firmly attached to the head of the hammer. Replace worn-out or broken parts.
  10. Hold a nail onto a piece of wood.
  11. Hold the hammer firmly and hit the nail several times until it enters.
  12. Slide the claw hammer under the nail head.
  13. Pull the handle towards you to remove the nail.
  14. Pick the screws to be fixed into the piece of wood.
  15. Select a screwdriver with a tip that matches the head of the screw.
  16. Ensure the tip of the screwdriver is not damaged. Replace broken or worn-out handles.
  17. Grasp the handle of the screwdriver and use it to drive the screw in the piece of wood.
  18. Ensure that the handle and the head of the brace are well fixed.
  19. Ensure that the cutting tip of the brace is sharp.
  20. Lay a piece of wood on the workbench and mark the hole to be drilled on the wood using a pencil.
  21. Place the brace on the piece of wood. Make a hole in the wood by rotating the handle.
  22. Ensure you have the glue and the pieces of wood to be attached ready.
  23. Check and ensure the screw and other moving parts of the clamp are oiled and functioning well.
  24. Apply glue on the pieces of wood and allow them to dry.
  25. Attach the glued parts of wood and fix them to the clamp.
  26. Tighten the screw of the clamp and leave it for a while till the parts are firmly joined.
  27. Hold the spirit level firmly and place it on the wooden surface that you want to check.
  28. View and note the position of the bubble in the spirit level.
  1. carprntry tools


Learners expected to respond.
  1. The word bench- It is a surface on which a carpenter does her or his work.
  2. Wood saw/ handsaw- It is used to cut pieces of wood into different shapes and sizes.
  3. Table saw- It is used to cut a block of wood into small pieces.
  4. Bow saw- It is used to make straight and curved cuts on wood.
  5. Claw hammer- It is used for driving nails in wood and also for pulling them out.
  6. Plane- It is used for smoothing wood to give smooth and shiny surfaces.
  7. Screwdriver- It is used to drive screws in wood. It is also used to remove screws out of wood.
  8. Brace- The brace is used for boring holes in wood.
  9. Clamp/ Jointer- A clamp is used to hold together pieces of wood to be glued.
  10. Spirit level- It is used to check if the wood surface is horizontal or vertical.
Use of carpentry tools.
The teacher asks learners to discuss in a group how these carpentry tools can be maintained in other to prolong its life span and to make it work effectively whenever it is used. learners expected to respond;
  • Clean the tools and store them in a clean dry place.
  • Remove all the tools that are not in use from the workbench. Wipe the bench and check if that is firm and stable.
  • After using the saws remove pieces of wood shaving stuck on the blade using a stick.
  • Apply oil on the metallic parts of the T-square to prevent rusting.
  • Store the T-square safely after use.
  • Store the hammer in a dry and safe place after use.
  • Blow out dirt from the joints of the clamp and wipe it with a moist piece of cloth.
  • Wipe the surface of the spirit level to remove dust and dirt from it.
Maintainance of carpentry tools.
Evaluation. Full class session (10 mins) Ask the following questions to evaluate the achievement of the set objectives.
  1. What is carpentry tools?
  2. What is the use of Carpentry tools?
  3. What are the maintenance of carpentry tools?
Learners expected to response:
  1. Carpenter tools are tools used to make wooden products.
  2. Carpentry tools are used for removing nails cutting wood, holding workpieces.
    1. Maintenance of carpentry tools include.
    2. Caring for and maintaining carpentry tools by oiling and sharpening metal parts.
    3. Cleaning properly after used
    4. Proper storage of carpentry tools in a cool dry place.
Confirming the achievement of the set objectives.
Conclusion, full class session (3 mins) Ask learners, what are general maintenance practices of carpentry tools. Learners expected to response.
  1. The tools need to be used for the right purpose. This is called proper use.
  2. Sharpening cutting tools. Tools with cutting edges such as chisel, saw, axe and plane need to be regularly sharpened when they become blunt.
  3. Cleaning tools after use.
  4. Repair all broken parts. Repairing broken parts makes the tools efficient and safe to work with. Broken handles and blades need to be replaced.
  5. Oiling metallic parts helps to prevent rusting. Oiling moving parts reduces friction.
  6. Proper storage. The tools need to be stored properly to avoid damage. They are also secured from thieves. Properly stored tools cannot cause injuries to people.
Acquiring/ improving understanding of carpentry tools.
ASSIGNMENT The teacher gives learners a take home.
Draw and name the following carpentry tools.
  1. carprntry tools
Learners answer other questions. Improving their level of understanding of carpentry tools.

Lesson Plan On Basic Technology

Woodwork Hand Tools

Subject: Basic Technology

Theme: Woodwork Hand Tools

Topic: Tools and Objects Production.

Sub Topic: Carpentry tools.

Date: dd/mm/yyyy

Class: JSS 1

Duration: 35 Minutes

No of Learners: 30

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
  1. Say what carpentry means.

    Carpentry is the art of making wooden products.
  2. Say what carpentry tools are.

    A tool is a handheld device used to carry out a particular function. Carpenters use carpentry tools to make wooden products.
  3. List usage and maintenance of some carpentry tools

    1. carprntry tools

    1. Workbench: It is a surface on which a carpenter does her or his work. Work that can be done on it includes smoothing wood, cutting, measuring and making joints on wood.
      Such as:
      • Placing a piece of wood on the workbench and cut it into two using a saw.
      • Smoothen one part of the wood on the workbench.
        Maintenance of a Workbench:
      • Remove all the tools that are not in use from the workbench. Wipe the bench and check if that is firm and stable.
    2. Saw: There are various types of saws. Examples are: Table saw, bow saw and wood saw.
      • Bow saw: This is also known as a frame saw or bucksaw. It is used to make straight and curved cuts on wood.
      • Table saw: It is made up of a circular blade that is moved by an electric motor. The blade is held in place by a table or bend. It is used to cut a block of wood into small pieces.
      • Wood saw: It is commonly called the handsaw. It is used to cut pieces of wood into different shapes and sizes.
        Maintenance of a Saw:
      • Check if the hand saw blade is sharp, if it does not sharpen it using a file. Check if the handle is in good condition.
      • After using the saws remove pieces of wood shaving stuck on the blade using a stick.
    3. T-square: It is used for drawing and measuring right-angled objects.
      Maintenance of a T-square:
      • Clean the parts to remove dust and sawdust. Store the T-square safely after use.
      • Apply oil on the metallic parts of the T-square to prevent rusting.
    4. Claw hammer: It is used for driving nails in wood and also for pulling it out.
      Maintenance of a Claw hammer:
      • Store the hammer in a dry and safe place after use.
    5. Plane: It is used for smoothing wood to give smooth and shiny surfaces. Examples of planes are: Jointer plane, Smoothing plane and Jack plane.
      Maintenance of a Plane:
      • Adjust the blade to the desired angle. Oil the plane.
      • Store the plane in a dry and safe place after use.
    6. Axe: An axe is used for splitting and cutting wood. It is also used for cutting down trees and uprooting stumps.
      Maintenance of an Axe:
      • Look at the blade of the axe. Is it sharp?
        • Sharpen blunt cutting edges of the axe.
        • Replace the worn-out blades with new ones.
        • Ensure the axe is firmly fixed to the handle.
      • Clean the blade and store the axe in a clean dry place.
    7. Screwdriver: It is used to drive screws in wood. It is also used to remove screws out of wood.
      Maintenance of a Screwdriver:
      • Ensure the tip of the screwdriver is not damaged. Replace broken or worn-out handles.
      • Clean the screwdriver and store the axe in a clean dry place.
    8. Brace: The brace is used for boring holes in wood. Force is applied on top and the handle rotated with one hand.
      Maintenance of a Brace:
      • Ensure that the handle and the head of the brace are well fixed.
      • Ensure that the cutting tip of the brace is sharp.
      • Clean and store the brace in a clean and dry place.
    9. Clamp/ Jointer: A clamp is used to hold together pieces of wood to be glued. It also holds together the glued parts until the glue is dry and the pieces of wood are firmly jointed.
      Maintenance of a Clamp/ Jointer:
      • Check and ensure the screw and other moving parts of the clamp are oiled and functioning well.
      • Blow out dirt from the joints of the clamp and wipe it with a moist piece of cloth.
      • Clean and store the Clamp/ Jointer in a clean and dry place.
    10. Spirit level: It is used to check if the wood surface is horizontal or vertical. The spirit level is placed on a wooden surface, then the position of the bubble in the viewing point is noted. Hold the spirit level firmly when using it. Do not let it drop on a hard surface because it can easily break.
      Maintenance of a Spirit level:
      • Wipe the surface of the spirit level to remove dust and dirt from it.

Rationale:

Carpentry tools are used by carpenters to make furniture. In our homes, we have different pieces of furniture. Carpentry tools need to be used and maintained the property as they are the source of livelihood to many. Carpentry is also a source of revenue for our country. This lesson will encourage learners to use and maintain common carpentry tools.

Prerequisite/ Previous or Assumed knowledge:

Learners know of wooden/ furniture products such as Chair, Table, Shelf, Bed, Desk etc

Learning Materials:

Carpentry tools, Charts, Pictures, Textbooks

Reference Materials:

Basic Technology Book 1 by R. Abu et al.
Online resouces.

Lesson Development:

STAGE
TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
LEARNING POINTS
INTRODUCTION
full class session (5mins)
The teacher asks the learners to name some furniture objects at home, offices, school, etc. Learners expected to respond.
Chairs, Tables, Beds, and Cupboards, Desk, kitchen cabinets and bookcases etc.
Confirming the previous lesson.
DEVELOPMENT Step 1
full class session (5 mins)
The teacher asks the learners, who made these furniture tools listed in the learner's activities above and with what material were they made. Learners expected to respond.
The tools were made by the carpenters and are made of wood.
Developing the concept of carpentry.
DEVELOPMENT Step 2. Group Work (2 mins) The teacher guides the learners to form four groups and ask them to choose their leaders and secretaries. Learners choose their group leaders and secretaries. Inculcating leadership skills, competitive spirit, cooperation, teamwork and a sense of responsibility among learners.
Step 3 Full class session (7 mins) The teacher asks learners in a group, what profession of persons make use of the tools display at the board/ ground or screen as the case may be (if the school has live carpentry tools the teacher should bring them out from the store for the learners to examine and identify).

The teacher should also ask and guide the learners to names each of the tools.
  1. carprntry tools
Learners expected response;
The tools are used by the carpenters.

The tools are: Spirit level, Brace, Clamp, Claw hammer, screwdriver, T-square, Plane, Saw, Word bench, chisel, tap, etc.
Introducing the topic Carpentry tools.
The teacher writes the topic on the board and asks learners to define carpentry and what carpentry tools are in their own words Learners expected to respond;
Carpentry is the art of making wooden products.

Carpenters use carpentry tools to make wooden products.
Meaning of carpentry and carpentry tools.
Stage 4
Full class discussion (10 mins)
The teacher asks the learners in a group study the pictures on the board and explains how the tools in the pictures are used by the carpenters.

If the school has a carpentry workshop, the teacher should take the learners to the workshop and guide learners to perform the following activities with the use of the carpentry tools.

  1. Remove all the tools that are not in use from the workbench. Wipe the bench and check if that is firm and stable.
  2. Place a piece of wood on the workbench and cut it into two using a saw.
  3. Check if the hand saw blade is sharp, if it does not sharpen it using a file. Check if the handle is in good condition.
  4. Hold a piece of timber and cut it using a hand saw.
  5. Cut another piece of wood using a bow saw.
  6. Place a T-square on a block of wood.
  7. Draw a straight line on the wood along the length and width of the T-square.
  8. Measure the angle formed and write down your answer.
  9. Ensure that the claw hammer handle is firmly attached to the head of the hammer. Replace worn-out or broken parts.
  10. Hold a nail onto a piece of wood.
  11. Hold the hammer firmly and hit the nail several times until it enters.
  12. Slide the claw hammer under the nail head.
  13. Pull the handle towards you to remove the nail.
  14. Pick the screws to be fixed into the piece of wood.
  15. Select a screwdriver with a tip that matches the head of the screw.
  16. Ensure the tip of the screwdriver is not damaged. Replace broken or worn-out handles.
  17. Grasp the handle of the screwdriver and use it to drive the screw in the piece of wood.
  18. Ensure that the handle and the head of the brace are well fixed.
  19. Ensure that the cutting tip of the brace is sharp.
  20. Lay a piece of wood on the workbench and mark the hole to be drilled on the wood using a pencil.
  21. Place the brace on the piece of wood. Make a hole in the wood by rotating the handle.
  22. Ensure you have the glue and the pieces of wood to be attached ready.
  23. Check and ensure the screw and other moving parts of the clamp are oiled and functioning well.
  24. Apply glue on the pieces of wood and allow them to dry.
  25. Attach the glued parts of wood and fix them to the clamp.
  26. Tighten the screw of the clamp and leave it for a while till the parts are firmly joined.
  27. Hold the spirit level firmly and place it on the wooden surface that you want to check.
  28. View and note the position of the bubble in the spirit level.
  1. carprntry tools


Learners expected to respond.
  1. The word bench- It is a surface on which a carpenter does her or his work.
  2. Wood saw/ handsaw- It is used to cut pieces of wood into different shapes and sizes.
  3. Table saw- It is used to cut a block of wood into small pieces.
  4. Bow saw- It is used to make straight and curved cuts on wood.
  5. Claw hammer- It is used for driving nails in wood and also for pulling them out.
  6. Plane- It is used for smoothing wood to give smooth and shiny surfaces.
  7. Screwdriver- It is used to drive screws in wood. It is also used to remove screws out of wood.
  8. Brace- The brace is used for boring holes in wood.
  9. Clamp/ Jointer- A clamp is used to hold together pieces of wood to be glued.
  10. Spirit level- It is used to check if the wood surface is horizontal or vertical.
Use of carpentry tools.
The teacher asks learners to discuss in a group how these carpentry tools can be maintained in other to prolong its life span and to make it work effectively whenever it is used. learners expected to respond;
  • Clean the tools and store them in a clean dry place.
  • Remove all the tools that are not in use from the workbench. Wipe the bench and check if that is firm and stable.
  • After using the saws remove pieces of wood shaving stuck on the blade using a stick.
  • Apply oil on the metallic parts of the T-square to prevent rusting.
  • Store the T-square safely after use.
  • Store the hammer in a dry and safe place after use.
  • Blow out dirt from the joints of the clamp and wipe it with a moist piece of cloth.
  • Wipe the surface of the spirit level to remove dust and dirt from it.
Maintainance of carpentry tools.
Evaluation. Full class session (10 mins) Ask the following questions to evaluate the achievement of the set objectives.
  1. What is carpentry tools?
  2. What is the use of Carpentry tools?
  3. What are the maintenance of carpentry tools?
Learners expected to response:
  1. Carpenter tools are tools used to make wooden products.
  2. Carpentry tools are used for removing nails cutting wood, holding workpieces.
    1. Maintenance of carpentry tools include.
    2. Caring for and maintaining carpentry tools by oiling and sharpening metal parts.
    3. Cleaning properly after used
    4. Proper storage of carpentry tools in a cool dry place.
Confirming the achievement of the set objectives.
Conclusion, full class session (3 mins) Ask learners, what are general maintenance practices of carpentry tools. Learners expected to response.
  1. The tools need to be used for the right purpose. This is called proper use.
  2. Sharpening cutting tools. Tools with cutting edges such as chisel, saw, axe and plane need to be regularly sharpened when they become blunt.
  3. Cleaning tools after use.
  4. Repair all broken parts. Repairing broken parts makes the tools efficient and safe to work with. Broken handles and blades need to be replaced.
  5. Oiling metallic parts helps to prevent rusting. Oiling moving parts reduces friction.
  6. Proper storage. The tools need to be stored properly to avoid damage. They are also secured from thieves. Properly stored tools cannot cause injuries to people.
Acquiring/ improving understanding of carpentry tools.
ASSIGNMENT The teacher gives learners a take home.
Draw and name the following carpentry tools.
  1. carprntry tools
Learners answer other questions. Improving their level of understanding of carpentry tools.

Lesson Note On Moving Our Body Parts

Physical & Health Education

Subject: Physical & Health Education

Theme: Fundamental movements & rhythmic activities

Topic: Locomotor movements

Sub Topic: Locomotor movements

Date: dd/mm/yyyy

Class: Basic One, Two & Three

Duration: 35 Minutes

No of Learners: 30

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
  1. Describe/defined locomotor movements.

    Locomotor movements are movements made from one place to another.
  2. List and demonstrate different types of locomotor movements.

    • locomotor movements


    1. Walking: You walk by putting one foot in front of, or sometimes behind, the other. You support the body by one leg first, and then the other, swinging your arms gently as you move forward.
    2. Leaping: You leap by lifting yourself and land on the balls of your feet.
    3. Running: You run by swinging your arms fast while your legs leap one after the other.
    4. Skipping: An example of this is the skipping rope exercise, you spring by jumping up and down while you use the rope to circle you.
    5. Hopping: This is when you spring on one foot and land on the same foot.
    6. Sliding: An example of this is when you play on a slider, you climb up from a ladder, and slide down on the other smooth surface.
    7. Jumping: This is when you spring from the ground as if you are bouncing.
    8. Leaping: This is to spring on one foot and land on the other foot.

Rationale:

It is important to have a mature level of locomotor skills, due to the applicable nature of these skills to specific activities such as gymnastics, dance, martial arts, skating, skiing, horseback riding, track & field activities, amongst others.

Prerequisite/Previous knowledge:

Learners have learnt moving body parts.

Learning Materials:

TV/VCR or DVD player, flashcards, poster or wallpaper, large open space.

Reference Materials:

Physical and Health Education for Primary Schools by A. Ayegbusi et al.


Lesson Development:

STAGE
TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
LEARNING POINTS
INTRODUCTION
full class session (3 mins)
Teacher checks learners’ readiness and sports uniform. Peace and values education:
This is developed through following instructions and respect of game rules and safe play.
Opening discussion: (1 min) Give learners command.
  1. Walk to the board.
  2. Run to the field.
  3. Leap three times.
  1. Learners walk to the board.
  2. Learners run to the field.
  3. Learners leap three times.
Confirming the previous lesson.
Warm-up: 2 min Let learners perform Warm-up exercises and stretching exercises. Learners jogging around the ground with maintaining a medium speed for one minute, raise and rotate hands according to teacher’s signals. Inclusive education:
Allow the learner with a missing hand to use feet in the place of hands.
For medium hearing disability: Be always near during instructions, use hand signs or tasking the most skilled learner to help him/her.
Stretching: 2 min Ask one learner to lead single-leg hop exercises and provide support. Learners perform general single-leg hop exercises.
Development of the lesson: (15 mins) The teacher explains to learners, we just did locomotor movements in the exercises we just performed.
The Teacher may give learners a prompt (- walking, running, and jumping, we move our body from one place to another).

Ask learners, what is locomotor movements?




Learners expected to respond.
Locomotor movements are movements made from one place to another.
Developing the idea of the concept of the topic, Locomotor movements.



Meaning of locomotor movements.
The teacher asks learners to list other types of locomotor movement exercises they can perform while moving their bodies from one place to another.

The Teacher may give learners a prompt (by hopping, leaping, skipping) and get learners to discuss their views in group activities.

Alternatively, the teacher may display pictures/posters of locomotor movements or pictures on learners textbook and asks learners to describe and list what they see in the pictures.

  • locomotor movements
FIX Exercise
Learners expected response:
  • Walking- This is a series of steps that involve the use of the legs and feet.
  • Leaping- This is to spring or jump on one foot and land on the other foot or both feet.
  • Running- This is a walk with longer strides or steps, and is faster than walking.
  • Hopping- This is when someone springs on one foot and lands on the same foot.
  • Jumping- This is when someone springs from the ground as if he or she is bouncing.
  • Skipping- This is when someone jumps, leaps or springs lightly over something. You can do this lightly, first, on one foot, and then on the other foot.
  • Leaping- This is to spring on one foot and land on the other foot.
  • Sliding- This is when someone climbs up from a ladder, and slide down on the other smooth surface.
Types of locomotor movements.
Evaluation. Full class session (10 mins) Ask the following questions to evaluate the achievement of the set objectives.
  1. What are locomotor movements?
  2. List five types of locomotor movements.
Learners expected response:
  1. Locomotor movements are movements made from one place to another.
    • Sliding
    • Running
    • Walking
    • Jumping
    • Leaping
Confirming the achievement of the set objectives.
Conclusion, full class session (3 mins) The teacher lets learners perform cool-down exercises. Moves from one place to another in a different direction following instructions - forward march, turn right, turn left, back turn, ... Communication: This is developed through answering questions verbally and interpreting of silent signs of teammates during the exercises.
ASSIGNMENT The teacher gives learners a take home.
  1. What are locomotor movements?
  2. List five types of locomotor movements.
  3. Draw three types of locomotor movements.
Learners answer other questions. Improving their level of understanding of locomotor movements.

Lesson Note on Moving Our Body Parts

Physical & Health Education

Subject: Physical & Health Education

Theme: Fundamental movements & rhythmic activities

Topic: Non-locomotor movements

Sub Topic: Non-locomotor movements

Date: dd/mm/yyyy

Class: Basic One, Two & Three

Duration: 35 Minutes

No of Learners: 30

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
  1. Describe / defined non-locomotor movements.

    Non-locomotor movements can be described as moving on the spot without going anywhere.
  2. List and demonstrate different types of non-locomotor movements.

    • non-locomotor movements
    1. Twisting: This happens when you rotate a part of your body without moving your feet.
    2. Bending: Bending occurs when you make your body curve forward, backward, downward or sideways.
    3. Stretching: This is when you bend and unbend parts of your body.
    4. pulling: This is when you draw somebody or something nearer to you.
    5. Pushing: This occurs when you press on something so that it moves forward.
    6. Turning: This occurs when you rotate the body without moving your legs.
    7. Shaking: This simply means shaking your body. For example, a dog shakes water out of its body when it is wet.
    8. Swinging: This is to move back and forth while suspended from above.

Rationale:

It is important to have a mature level of non-locomotor skills, due to the applicable nature of these skills to specific activities such as gymnastics, dance, martial arts, skating, skiing, horseback riding, track & field activities, amongst others.

Prerequisite/Previous knowledge:

Learners have learnt locomotor movements.

Learning Materials:

TV/VCR or DVD player, flashcards, poster or wall paper, large open space.

Reference Materials:

Physical and Health Education for Primary Schools by A. Ayegbusi et al.


Lesson Development:

STAGE
TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
LEARNING POINTS
INTRODUCTION
full class session (3 mins)
Teacher checks learners’ readiness and sports uniform. Peace and values education:
This is developed through following instructions and respect of game rules and safe play.
Opening discussion: (1 min) Ask a question related to locomotor movement.
  1. What is locomotor movement?
  2. Give three examples of locomotor movement.
  1. Locomotor movements are movements made from one place to another.
    1. Walking
    2. Running
    3. Hopping
Confirming the previous lesson.
Warm-up: 2 min Let learners perform warm-up exercises and stretching exercises. Learners jogging around the ground with maintaining a medium speed for one minute, raise and rotate hands according to teacher’s signals. Inclusive education:
Allow the learner with a missing hand to use feet in the place of hands,
for medium hearing disability: Be always near during instructions, use hand signs or tasking the most skilled learner to help him/her.
Stretching: 2 min Ask one learner to lead stretching exercises and provide support. Learners perform general stretching exercises focusing on body parts.
Development of the lesson: (15 mins) Teacher asks learners, in the exercises we just performed, at some time you move your body while changing position (e.g jogging - teacher should recap learners that they have learnt that jogging is an example of locomotor movement), at another time you move your body while in the same position (e.g stretching). What kind of movement do you think this will be called?

The teacher writes learners comments on the board.
Learners expected to respond.
Non-locomotor movement
Developing the idea of the concept of the topic, Non-locomotor movements.
The teacher asks learners to act and list other types of exercises they can perform while still in the same position, that is, without moving from one place to another.

The Teacher may give learners a prompt (by twisting, bending, stretching, pushing, turning, shaking his body) and get learners to discuss their views in group activities.

Alternatively, the teacher may display pictures/posters on non-locomotor movements or pictures on learners textbook and asks learners to describe and list what they see in the pictures.

  • non-locomotor movements
FIX Exercise
Learners expected response:
  • Twisting- rotate a part of your body without moving your feet.
  • Bending- by curving our body forward, backward, downward or sideways.
  • Stretching- by bending and unbending parts of your body.
  • pulling- by drawing somebody or something nearer to ourselves.
  • Pushing- by pressing on something so that it moves forward.
  • Turning:- by rotating the body without moving our legs.
  • Shaking- by simply shaking our body.
Types of Non-locomotor movements.
Evaluation. Full class session (10 mins) Ask the following questions to evaluate the achievement of the set objectives.
  1. What are non-locomotor movements?
  2. List five types of non-locomotor movements.
Learners expected response:
  1. Non-locomotor movements are movements a person performs while being stationary, that is, in the same position.
    • Stretching
    • Bending
    • Twisting
    • Pushing
    • pulling
Confirming the achievement of the set objectives.
Conclusion, full class session (3 mins) The teacher lets learners to perform cool-down exercises Moves their body slowly and relaxing arms in a different direction following instructions - up, down, up up, up, down, down, up, ... Communication: This is developed through answering questions verbally and interpreting of silent signs of teammates during the exercises.
ASSIGNMENT The teacher gives learners a take home.
  1. What are non-locomotor movements?
  2. List seven types of non-locomotor movements.
  3. Draw three types of non-locomotor movements.
Learners answer other questions. Improving their level of understanding of non-locomotor movements.

Lesson Plan on Agriculture

Basic Farm Tools

Subject: Agriculture

Theme: Processes of agricultural production

Topic: Basic farm tools

Sub Topic: Basic farm tools

Date: dd/mm/yyyy

Class: Basic Two

Duration: 35 Minutes

No of Learners: 30

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
  1. Say what basic farm tools are.

    Basic are farm tools are simple materials used by farmers for performing various farming activities on the farm.

  2. Identify and name some basic farm tools.

    • Basic farm tools


    • Machete-

      It is mainly used for cutting down small trees and grass used to feed livestock. It is also used to clear the land before cultivation.
    • Axe-

      It is used for: Cutting tree stumps. Felling big trees during the initial stages of land preparation. Splitting trees into logs for the construction of farm structures and firewood.
    • Pickaxe-

      It is used for: Digging out stony grounds and hard soil. Uprooting tree stumps before ploughing. Cutting tree roots during land preparation.
    • Digging hoe -

      It is used for the cultivation of land when preparing the seedbed and during weeding. Digging foundations of farm structures and buildings. Preparing planting furrows and holes.
    • Hand hoe -

      It is used for the cultivation of land when preparing the seedbed and during weeding. Digging foundations of farm structures and buildings. Preparing planting furrows and holes.
    • Wheelbarrow-

      It is used for transporting small loads like sand, bags of seeds or seedlings (during transplanting), bags of fertiliser, among others within a short distance.
    • Rake -

      It is used for: Collecting uprooted plant roots and stems when preparing a nursery seedbed for vegetable crops. Breaking large soil clods, removing stones and other rubbish to obtain a fine tilth for tiny seeds. Levelling and finishing of the seedbed.
    • Garden trowel -

      This is a pointed scoop-like tool. It is used for: Loosening the soil. Digging small shallow holes. Lifting out seedlings from the nursery bed during transplanting.
    • Garden fork-

      It is used for: Weeding nursery or carrot fields. Preparing holes for transplanting seedlings.
    • Watering can-

      It is used for watering seedlings in seedboxes, potted plants, nursery beds and transplanted seedlings.
    • Shovel-

      It closely resembles the spade, but it has a tray-like blade. It is used for scooping loose soil, fertilisers, seeds and sand.
    • Spade-

      It is used for: Digging in place of a hoe, for instance in coffee plantations where the use of a hoe may damage coffee roots. Removing soil when digging holes and applying manure.
    • Slasher-

      It is used for clearing shrubs.
    • Billhook-

      It is used for cutting banana leaves.
    • Forked hoe-

      It is used for: Removing underground perennial weeds, such as couch grass. Digging hard, stony, wet or muddy soils. Harvesting tuber crops such as Irish potatoes.
    • Garden shear-

      It is used for trimming hedges and shrubs on the farm.
    • Manure fork-

      It is mainly used for moving heavy loads of manure or compost.
    • Sickle-

      It is a hand-held agricultural tool with a curved blade. It is typically used for harvesting grain crops or cutting succulent forage chiefly for feeding livestock.
    • Bag-

      It is used to store seeds, grains or seedlings.
    • Head pan-

      It is used for transporting small loads like sand, seeds or seedlings among others within a short distance.
  3. Group basic farm tools.

    • Cutting tools.
    • Digging tools.
    • Carrying tools.

Rationale:

In agriculture, there are so many tools and machines that can be used to facilitate various agricultural activities. Each of the agricultural tools and implements is usually used for specific operations. These tools can be used both during crop production and livestock production. All of them have an important role to play in the improvement of agricultural operations. Therefore, there is a need to teach our learners these basic agricultural farm tools.

Prerequisite/ Previous knowledge:

Learners have learnt about fruits and crops.

Learning Materials:

Charts, pictures, farm tools, fruits, crops.

Reference Materials:

Basic Agriculture for Primary Schools Pupils’ Book Two. By E.J. Usua, S.O. Olaitan, C.O. Uzuegbunam.


Lesson Development:

STAGE
TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
LEARNING POINTS
INTRODUCTION
full class session (3 mins)
Teacher asks learners.
Name some fruits and crops you know.
Learners expected to respond.
Apple, Orange, Okro, Yam,etc.
Confirming the previous lesson.
DEVELOPMENT Step 1. Group Work (2 mins) The teacher guides the learners to form four groups and ask them to choose their leaders and secretaries. Learners choose their group leaders and secretaries. Inculcating leadership skills, competitive spirit, cooperation, teamwork and a sense of responsibility among learners.
INTRODUCTION Step 2 Full class session (7 mins) The teacher asks learners, all the fruits and crops mentioned in the learners' activity. Where do they come from?


The teacher asks a follow-up question, who work on the farm to produce these fruits and crops?
Learners respond.
They come from the farm.


Learners response, the farmer work on the farm.
Developing the ideas of the concepts of the topic basic farm tools.
Teacher gives the class a prompt (the farmer does work on the farm with the use of simple farm tools/materials like the cutlass, hoe).

The teacher asks learners to discuss in a group, what do you understand by the term,
basic farm tools.
Learners responses froms groups;
Basic farm tools are the simple materials used by farmers to work on the farm.
The teacher writes the topic on the board.
The teacher display pictures on the board and asks learners to identify the pictures. Learners identify the pictures as basic farm tools.
  • Basic farm tools
Basic farm tools.
The teacher asks learners to explain what the farmers are doing in the pictures.

  • Basic farm tools
Learners response,
  • Cutting grasses with a machete.
  • Cutting a log of wood with an axe.
  • Carrying tubers of yam with a basket.
  • Digging the soil with a hoe.
  • Carrying cut grasses with a wheelbarrow.
Developing the idea of a grouping of basic farm tools.
The teacher asks learners, the activities perform by the farmers in the pictures can be grouped into ____, ____ and _____
The teacher gives the class a prompt (two farmers are cutting with a cutlass and axe, three farmers are digging with a hoe, two farmers are carrying with a basket and wheelbarrow).
Learners response,
  • Cutting.
  • Digging.
  • Carrying.
Grouping of basic farm tools.
Stage 3
Group work activity (10 mins)
The teacher gives learners activities.
Group the tools in the chart according to their usage by the farmer for cutting, digging and carrying in a tabular form.


The teacher should guide learners in the activity.
Cutting Digging Carrying
Learners carried out the activity in a group.
Cutting Digging Carrying
MacheteDigging hoeBucket
AxeHand hoeBasket
slasherGarden trowelBasin
Pick axeSpadeHead pan
sickleForked hoeWheelbarrow
Garden shearShovelSack bag
Identification and grouping basic farm tools.
Evaluation. Full class session (10 mins) Ask the following questions to evaluate the achievement of the set objectives.
  1. Defined basic farm tools?
  2. Identify and name the following farm tools.
    • Basic farm tools
  3. List the groups or classification of the basic farm tools.
Learners expected response:
  1. Basic farm tools are materials used by the farmer to work on the farm.
    1. Shovel
    2. Digging hoe
    3. Hand hoe
    4. Pick axe
    5. Forked hoe
    6. Spade
    7. Rake
    8. Garden fork
    9. Manure fork
    10. Wheelbarrow
    11. Watering can
    12. Pick axe
    13. Machete
    14. Slasher
    15. Knife
    16. Sickle
    1. Cutting tools
    2. Digging tools
    3. Carrying tools
Confirming the achievement of the set objectives.
Conclusion, full class session (3 mins) Ask learners,
What are the use of cutting tools, digging tools and carrying tools?
Learners expected response.

Learners concluded the lesson that.

  1. Farmers use cutting tools for cutting.
  2. Farmers use digging tools for digging.
  3. Farmers use carrying tools for carrying farm products.
Acquiring/ improving understanding of the basic farm tools.
ASSIGNMENT The teacher gives learners a take home.
Draw, colour and label the basic farm tools below.
  • Basic farm tools
Learners answer other questions. Improving their level of understanding of the basic farm tools.

Lesson Plan on Christian Religious Studies

God fulfils His Promises

Subject: Christian Religious Studies

Theme: God fulfils His promises

Topic: God fulfils His promises to Abraham

Sub Topic: God fulfils His promises to Abraham

Date: dd/mm/yyyy

Class: Basic Two

Duration: 35 Minutes

No of Learners: 30

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
  1. tell the story of the call of Abraham.

    Abraham used to be called Abram. He was an idol worshipper. He lived with his father and other relatives in a place called Haran. God decided to call Abram to worship and serve Him. He instructed Abram to leave his country, his relatives and his father’s house and go to the land of Canaan. Abram was seventy-five years old when God called him.

  2. list God’s promises to Abraham.

      God said:
    • I will make you become the father of a great nation.
    • I will bless you and make your name great and famous.
    • I will make you a blessing to others.
    • I will bless those who bless you and curse those who curse you.
    • All the families of the earth will be blessed through you.
    • I will give your descendants the land of Canaan.
  3. explain how Abraham responded to God’s call.

    When Abram heard God’s call, he believed what God promised and he obeyed. He took his wife, his nephew Lot, his servants and all his possessions and left Haran to go to Canaan.

  4. explain how God fulfilled His promises to Abraham through Jacob.

    While Jacob slept, he dreamt that there was a ladder that reached heaven from the ground. He saw God’s angels climbing up and down the ladder. Then he saw God standing above the ladder and saying to him, ‘I am the Lord, the God of Abraham your father and the God of Isaac. I will give to you and your descendants the land you are lying down on’.
    God repeated the promise He had made to Abraham. He promised to be with Jacob and bring him back to the land of Canaan.

Rationale:

When our friends, relatives, families, even our parents promise us something, most times they fail to keep their promises, they give us excuses why they are unable to fulfil their promises, but when God promise you something He always fulfils his promises just as He did to Abraham. Therefore, there is a need to teach our learners that God fulfils His promises, for this will help learners put on their confidence in God and to hold unto God's promises.

Prerequisite/ Previous knowledge:

Learners have learnt about God the creator.

Learning Materials:

  • The Holy Bible.
  • Flashcard.
  • Learners studies material

Reference Materials:

Basic Christian Religious Studies for Primary Schools Pupils' Book 3 by Hannah Ishola, Peter Oladapo, Victoria Ama, Yvonne Onah.

Guide to Bible passages:

(Genesis 12: 1– 9; 13: 14 –17; and 28: 1–15).

Lesson Development:

STAGE
TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
LEARNING POINTS
INTRODUCTION
full class session (3 mins)
The teacher asks learners.
who is God?
Learners expected to respond.
God is our creator.
Confirming the previous lesson.
DEVELOPMENT Step 1. Group Work (2 mins) The teacher guides the learners to form four groups and ask them to choose their leaders and secretaries. Learners choose their group leaders and secretaries. Inculcating leadership skills, competitive spirit, cooperation, teamwork and a sense of responsibility among learners.
INTRODUCTION Step 2 Full class session (7 mins) The teacher asks learners to bring out their Bible and gave selected verses to each group leader to read while the rest of the class follows.

The teacher should correction to learners pronunciation as they read.

The teacher should thereafter read through the entire verse while learners pay attension.
Group leaders read selected verses, members of each group read along with them silently. Developing the ideas of the concepts of the topic God fulfils His promises to Abraham.
The teacher asks learners in groups, what they understand from each verse.

Teacher to give affirmation and compliment learners for their good effort.
Learners response from groups;
  1. The story of Abraham.
  2. God’s promises to Abraham.
  3. God’s promises to Jacob.
The teacher writes the topic on the board.
Teacher commend on learners activity above,
and ask learners to tell the story of Abraham from the verses read.
Learners expected response.

Abraham used to be called Abram. He was an idol worshipper. He lived with his father and other relatives in a place called Haran. God decided to call Abram to worship and serve Him. He instructed Abram to leave his country, his relatives and his father’s house and go to the land of Canaan. Abram was seventy-five years old when God called him.

The story of Abraham.
Stage 3
Full class discussion (10 mins)
The teacher read through the verses again and ask learners to list God’s promises to Abraham.
Teacher should explain further each point made by learners with a prompt that will aid the learners to have more understanding of God promises to Abraham. Such as,
  • Who can tell me the name of that great nation?
  • Do you know what it means to be great and famous? etc.



Teacher to give affirmation and compliment learners for their good effort.
Learners raised their hands to respond to the teacher's question.
  1. I will make you become the father of a great nation.
  2. I will bless you and make your name great and famous.
  3. I will make you a blessing to others.
  4. I will bless those who bless you and curse those who curse you.
  5. All the families of the earth will be blessed through you.
  6. I will give your descendants the land of Canaan.
God's promises to Abraham.
The teacher read through the verse again and ask learners
  • to list or explain how Abraham responded to God’s call.
  • to explain how God fulfilled His promises to Abraham through Jacob.
Learners expected response.
  • When Abram heard God’s call, he believed what God promised and he obeyed. He took his wife, his nephew Lot, his servants and all his possessions and left Haran to go to Canaan.
  • While Jacob slept, he dreamt that there was a ladder that reached heaven from the ground. He saw God’s angels climbing up and down the ladder. Then he saw God standing above the ladder and saying to him, ‘I am the Lord, the God of Abraham your father and the God of Isaac. I will give to you and your descendants the land you are lying down on’. God repeated the promise He had made to Abraham. He promised to be with Jacob and bring him back to the land of Canaan.
How Abraham responded to God’s call and how God fulfilled His promises to Abraham through Jacob.
Evaluation. Full class session (10 mins) Ask the following questions to evaluate the achievement of the set objectives.
  1. How did Abraham respond to God’s call?
  2. A. Abraham ran away.
    B. Abraham did not believe.
    C. Abraham disobeyed.
    D. Abraham believed God and obeyed.
  3. Abraham was Jacob’s
  4. A. father.
    B. uncle.
    C. grandfather.
    D. nephew.
  5. List four promises of God to Abraham.
  6. How old was Abraham when God called him?.
Learners expected response:
  1. D. Abraham believed in God and obeyed.
  2. C. grandfather.
    • I will make you a blessing to others.
    • I will bless those who bless you and curse those who curse you.
    • All the families of the earth will be blessed through you.
    • I will give your descendants the land of Canaan.
  3. 75 years old.
Confirming the achievement of the set objectives.
Conclusion, full class session (3 mins) Ask learners,
Did God fulfils His promises to Abraham?

Learners recite the moral lesson after the teacher.
Learners expected response.

Learners concluded the lesson that God fulfil His promises to Abraham.


Moral lessons
  • Abraham was an idol worshipper before God called him. Because he obeyed God’s call, God changed him from an idol worshipper to a God worshipper. When we answer God’s call, we also become worshippers of God.
  • Abraham believed God’s promises and God blessed him. We also are blessed when we believe in God’s promises.
  • Abraham believed in God’s promises and obeyed God. When we obey God, we are showing him that we believe in Him.
  • God’s blessing to our parents can also be our blessings because we are their descendants.
Acquiring/ improving understanding of God fulfils His promises to Abraham.
ASSIGNMENT The teacher gives learners a take home.
  • Tell the story of the call of Abraham.
  • Draw a picture of Jacob’s dream.
  • Find out the meaning of the following words: (a) Idol worshipper, (b) Relatives, (c) Possessions, and (d) Memorial.
Learners answer other questions. Improving their level of understanding of God fulfils His promises to Abraham.

Lesson Plan on Civic Education

National Identity

Subject: Civic Education

Theme: National consciousness

Topic: National identity

Sub Topic: Meaning & Elements of national identity

Date: dd/mm/yyyy

Class: Basic Three

Duration: 35 Minutes

No of Learners: 30

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
  1. Say the meaning of National identity.

    National identity can be referred to as the symbols, actions and behaviour, beliefs, languages and feelings that make people from one country different from people from other countries. It also means accepting and belonging to a country by taking part in its activities and obeying the rules and regulations of that country.

  2. Mention elements of national identity.

    Certain things make it possible for people to identify themselves as members of one country or another. These include the following:

    • National anthem: This is a song that has special importance for a country. It tells the way the people feel about their country.
    • Citizenship of a nation: The citizens feel special about their nation. They enjoy certain rights and are expected to do certain things for their country.
    • Payment of taxes and dues: The people pay taxes that has used to develop their country.
    • Working to make the society better: all true citizens of a country strive towards making their country better.
    • Showing respect for national symbols: People who identify with their country show respect for the national symbols of their country. For example, in Nigeria, many offices and organisations fly the national flag always. Some have the coat of arms, the pictures of the president, and the state governor. We stand at attention when we say the national pledge and when we sing the national anthem.

Rationale:

National identity is a person's identity or sense of belonging to one or more states to one or more nations. It is the sense of a nation as a cohesive whole, as represented by distinctive traditions, culture, and language it is an awareness of difference, a feeling and recognition of 'we' and 'they'. People with identification of their nation view national beliefs and values as personally meaningful and translate these beliefs and values into daily practices. Therefore, there is a need to teach our learners about our National identity for our learners to have a state of belonging, patriotism, national pride and positive emotion of love for our country.

Prerequisite/ Previous knowledge:

Learners have learnt about the seven continents and some countries.

Learning Materials:

  • A clip of movies of Indians, Americans, Nigerians, Chinese.
  • Flashcards or pictures of National symbols e.g
    The national currency, National flag, Coat of arms, etc.
  • Rhymes and songs. e.g National Anthem, National Pledge, some popular national actors & actress, musicians and their songs, etc.

Reference Materials:

Basic Civic Education for Primary Schools Pupils' Book 3 by B. J. Obebe, F. J. Muazu, H. O. C. Ambassador-Brikins, S. O. Koledoye.

Lesson Development:

STAGE
TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
LEARNING POINTS
INTRODUCTION
full class session (3 mins)
The teacher asks learners to name and mention the number of continents we have. Learners expected to respond.
There are 7 continents. namely; Asia, Africa, North America, South America, Antarctica, Europe, and Australia.

An environment is the natural surroundings in which we live.

Confirming the previous lesson.
DEVELOPMENT Step 1. Group Work (2 mins) The teacher guides the learners to form four groups and ask them to choose their leaders and secretaries. Learners choose their group leaders and secretaries. Inculcating leadership skills, competitive spirit, cooperation, teamwork and a sense of responsibility among learners.
INTRODUCTION Step 2 Full class session (7 mins) The teacher played a short clip of the movie and ask learners in groups, who are those that acted in these movies? In groups, Learners responded base on the clip they watched;
Indians, Americans, Nigerians, Chinese, Ghanaians.
Developing the ideas of the concepts of the topic of National identity.
The teacher asks learners in groups, how do you know they are Indians, Americans, Nigerians, Chinese, Ghanaians?

Teacher to give affirmation and compliment learners for their good effort.
Learners response from groups;
  1. The way they speak.
  2. The way they dress.
  3. The way they greet.
  4. The way they feel.
  5. Through their actions.
  6. Through their symbols (images, pictures, status etc)
  7. The way they dance.
  8. The way they sing.
  9. The things they believe.
Developing the meaning of national identity.
The teacher commend on learners activity above,
Through these symbols, actions etc we have been able to identify and distinguish a person from one nation from the other, an Indian from an American, An American from a Nigerian, a Nigerian from a Chinese, a Chinese from a Ghanian etc.

The teacher asks learners, in your own words. What is National Identity?
Learners expected response.
National identity can be referred to as the symbols, actions and behaviour, beliefs, languages and feelings that make people from one country different from people from other countries.
Meaning of National Identity.
Stage 3
Full class discussion (10 mins)
Teacher asks learners, in an international competition like football, before players commence a football match, and during the match, there is something which every player, their members, fans, supporters usually do, it helps outsiders to identify these players and their members.
What is it?

The Teacher may give the class more prompts that will aid the learners to list the elements of National identity.


Teacher to give affirmation and compliment learners for their good effort.
Learners raised their hands to respond to the teacher's question.
  1. Their national anthem.
  2. Respect for their national anthem.
  3. Special feelings for their nation.
  4. Working together to make their nation better.
  5. Contribution to their nation.
Developing the idea of the elements of national identity.
Teacher to give further explanation of the elements of national identity.
  • National anthem: This is a song that has special importance for a country. It tells the way the people feel about their country.
  • Citizenship of a nation: The citizens feel special about their nation. They enjoy certain rights and are expected to do certain things for their country.
  • Payment of taxes and dues: The people pay taxes that are used to develop their country.
  • Working to make the society better: all true citizens of a country strive towards making their country better.
  • Showing respect for national symbols: People who identify with their country show respect for the national symbols of their country. For example, in Nigeria, many offices and organisations fly the national flag always. Some have the coat of arms, the pictures of the president, and the state governor. We stand at attention when we say the national pledge and when we sing the national anthem.
Learners pay attention to the teacher. Elements of national identity.
Evaluation. Full class session (10 mins) Ask the following questions to evaluate the achievement of the set objectives.
  1. What is National Identity?
  2. List the elements of the national identity.
Learners expected response:
  1. National identity can be referred to as the symbols, actions and behaviour, beliefs, languages and feelings that make people from one country different from people from other countries.

    1. National anthem.
    2. Citizenship.
    3. Payment of taxes and dues.
    4. Working to make society better.
    5. Showing respect for national symbols.
Confirming the achievement of the set objectives.
Conclusion, full class session (3 mins) Ask learners, some of our family members, friends that have stayed in foreign countries for so long and thereafter return home seems to possess some trait of the country they lived in before coming back home. What is responsible for that? Learners expected response.

Learners concluded the lesson that these persons have been transformed by the national identity of that country.

Acquiring/ improving understanding of national identity.
ASSIGNMENT The teacher gives learners a take home.
  1. What is national identity?
  2. List the elements of national identity.
Learners answer other questions. Improving their level of understanding of national identity.

ASEI PDSI Lesson Note On English Language

Transitive & Intransitive Verbs

Subject: English Language

Theme: Parts of Speech

Topic: Verbs

Sub Topic: Classification of Verbs - Transitive & Intransitive Verbs

Date: dd/mm/yyyy

Class: JSS 2

Duration: 35 Minutes

No of Learners: 30

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
  1. Say what verbs are.

    Verbs are doing words, i.e a verb shows what we are doing, it shows action.

  2. List types/ classification of verbs.

    1. Transitive Verbs: These are verbs whose actions can be passed to something and person in sentences. i.e they require an object to make meaning. E.g
      The Teacher finished his scheme yesterday.
      Here, the teacher did something; FINISHED, and finished was passed into something; SCHEME. Hence, finished is a transitive verb, while his scheme is the direct object.
    2. Intransitive Verbs: These verbs do not require objects to make their meanings complete. The action they express is not passed to an object or person. E.g. All dogs bark.
      Here, all dogs do something; BARK, and bark was not passed into anything or person. Hense, bark is intransitive verb.

Rationale:

Verbs are the compulsory element in sentences, verbs express the actions which nouns and pronouns perform in sentences. Verbs also express conditions or states of being of nouns and pronouns. Therefore, there is a need to teach our learners about verbs since verbs are very important words in the English Language.

Language Area or Skill:

  • Grammar
  • Vocabulary
  • Writing
  • Reading
  • Speaking

Prerequisite/ Previous knowledge:

Students have been taught parts of speech.

Learning Materials:

Webster's Encyclopaedic Dictionary, Concise Oxford English Dictionary, Flashcard, One copy of each page of the student worksheet per learner. A whiteboard and pens.

Reference Materials:

Nigeria Primary English Pupils’ Book 4 By F Ademola-Adeoye, Q Adam, B Somoye et al.

Lesson Development:

STAGE
TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
LEARNING POINTS
INTRODUCTION
full class session (5mins)
The teacher asks the learners to recite the parts of speech of the English Language. Learners recite the eight parts of speech of the English language.
  1. Nouns
  2. Pronouns
  3. Verbs
  4. Adjectives
  5. Adverbs
  6. Prepositions
  7. Conjunctions
  8. Interjections
Revising the previous lesson and reciting the eight parts of speech.
DEVELOPMENT Step 1. Group Work (2 mins) The teacher guides the learners to form four groups and ask them to choose their leaders and secretaries. Learners choose their group leaders and secretaries. Inculcating leadership skills, competitive spirit, cooperation, teamwork and a sense of responsibility among learners.
Step 2 Full class session (7mins) Guide learners in activities that lead them to the definition of a verb. The teacher gives the four groups flashcards, and ask them to act and not to say what they saw in the flash card. Let every group act out what they saw in their flashcards consecutively.
The teacher should let the rest of the class say out what each group is acting.
The teaching explains to the learner that each of them just did something, each of them acted something, each of the just acted, that is, performed an action. some of you dance, others cried, some sing etc.
This acting or doing or action is called a verb.
Learners expected response;
  1. Group saw dancing in the flashcard and acted dancing.
    The rest of the class says what they are doing; DANCING
  2. Group saw sleeping in the flashcard and acted sleeping.
    The rest of the class says what they are doing; SLEEPING
  3. Group saw singing in the flashcard and acted singing.
    The rest of the class says what they are doing; SINGING
  4. Group saw crying in the flashcard and acted crying.
    The rest of the class says what they are doing; CRYING
  5. Group saw clapping in the flashcard and acted clapping.
    The rest of the class says what they are doing; CLAPPING
  6. Group saw writing in the flashcard and acted writing.
    The rest of the class says what they are doing; WRITING etc.
Developing the meaning of verbs from the activity.
The teacher asks learners to define verbs in their own words Learners expected to respond;
A verb is a doing word.
Definition of verbs
Stage 3
Full class discussion (10 mins)
The Teacher writes two sentences on the board and asks learners to read them out and identify the verbs in the sentences.
  1. The teacher cane Andrew.
  2. Babies smile.

Teacher to give affirmation and compliment learners for their good effort.
The teacher thereafter explains to learners that smile & cane are verbs, however, are different type of verb as used in the sentence. That is, a verb can be classified into one group or class based on how it is used in a sentence.
Learners read the sentences and identify the verbs.
  1. Cane
  2. Smile.
Developing the idea of classification of verbs.
The teacher explains the action performed in the sentences above by asking the learners questions.
  • In the first sentence, the teacher did what?
  • The cane was used on who?
  • In the second sentence, Babies do what?
  • Was the smile transfer to something or a person?

The teacher explains to learners that since the verb 'Cane' in the first sentence was transferred to something or somebody, this type of verb is called Transitive Verb. Since the verb 'Smile' was not passed to something or person, this type of verb is called Intransitive Verb
learners expected respond;
  • Cane
  • Andrew
  • Smile
  • No
Developing the idea of Transitive & Intransitive Verbs.
The teacher asks learners to defined Transitive and Intransitive Verbs in their own words. Learners expected to respond;
  • Transitive verbs are verbs whose actions can be passed to something or a person in sentences.
  • Intransitive verbs are verbs whose actions are not passed to other things or people.
Defining transitive verbs and intransitive verbs.
Evaluation. Full class session (10 mins) Ask the following questions to evaluate the achievement of the set objectives.
  1. What is a verb?
  2. Underline the verbs in the following sentences.
    1. We tear the paper.
    2. She wins again.
    3. I see the sunshine.
    4. Joe climbed slowly.
    5. Eze is very generous.
  3. Identify the Transitive verbs and Intransitive verbs in the following sentences.
    1. Peter loves reading.
    2. The Child cried.
    3. Snail crawl.
    4. The hunter kills the grasscutter.
    5. He runs.
Learners expected response:
  1. A verb is a doing/ action word that nouns and pronouns perform in sentences.
  2. We tear the paper

  3. she wins again.
  4. I see sunshine.
  5. Joe climbed slowly.
  6. Eze is very generous.

  7. Peter loves reading. loves is Transitive Verb
  8. The Child cried. cried is Intransitive Verb
  9. Snail crawl. crawl is Intransitive Verb
  10. The hunter kills the grasscutter. kills is Transitive Verb
  11. He runs. runs is Intransitive Verb
Confirming the achievement of the set objectives.
Conclusion, full class session (3 mins) Ask learners to make simple sentences with DANCE as a Transitive verb and Intransitive verb. Learners expected response.
  1. Children dance at the party. dance is Transitive Verb
  2. children dance. dance is Intransitive Verb
Some verbs can function as both transitive and intransitive verbs, it is the way that they are used that determines the class they belong to.
Acquiring/ improving understanding of transitive and intransitive verbs.
ASSIGNMENT The teacher gives learners a take home. Underline the verbs in the following sentences also indicate if it is a Transitive verb or Intransitive verb.
  1. The birds flew.
  2. Mr Alex teaches us, French.
  3. The baby slept soundly.
  4. Lions roar.
  5. My father can kill a lion.
  6. Drugs cures and kills.
Learners answer other questions. Improving their level of understanding of verbs.

ASEI PDSI Lesson Note On Computer Studies

Computer System

Subject: Computer Studies

Theme: Basic computer operation and concepts

Topic: Computer System

Sub Topic: Components of the computer system

Date: dd/mm/yyyy

Class: Basic Five

Duration: 35 Minutes

No of Learners: 30

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
  1. Say what the computer system is.

    The computer system is an interrelated part of the computer working together to function as one.

    • Computer System
  2. Identify the component of the computer system.

    1. Hardware
    2. Software
    3. Human ware / Peopleware / User

Rationale:

In the world today, every aspect of man make use of the computer, or is related and connected to the use of the computer. The human legs cannot walk without the brain neither can the brain do the walking without the legs, so also the computer. The computer can only perform its functions with the connection of some interrelated parts to form a computer system. Therefore, there is a need to teach our learners about the computers system since the computer is useless without its system.

Prerequisite/ Previous knowledge:

Learners have learnt what a computer is.

Learning Materials:

Computer hall / ICT centre in the School, Flashcard of various components of the computer, Picture of the computer system.

Reference Materials:

Foundation Computer Studies for Primary Schools' Book 5 by E. O. Adegbeyeni et al.


Lesson Development:

STAGE
TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
LEARNING POINTS
INTRODUCTION
full class session (3 mins)
The teacher asks learners what is a computer. Learners defined a computer in their own words.

    A computer is an electronic machine, accept data, process data & give information in a way that is suitable for its user.

Confirming the previous lesson.
DEVELOPMENT Step 1. Group Work (2 mins) The teacher guides the learners to form four groups and ask them to choose their leaders and secretaries. Learners choose their group leaders and secretaries. Inculcating leadership skills, competitive spirit, cooperation, teamwork and a sense of responsibility among learners.
INTRODUCTION Step 2 Full class session (7 mins) In groups, the teacher asks learners, to name parts of the body that makes up the body.


Teacher to give affirmation and compliment learners for their good effort.
Learners expected response;
The head, legs, hands, eyes, ears, etc.
Developing the ideas of a system and introducing the topic Computer system.
The teacher explains to learners that the parts of the body mentioned in the learners’ activity above are the body system.

The teacher gives each group a flashcard and asks learners to define a computer system in their own words.
  • Computer System
Learners expected to respond;
The computer system is an interrelated part of the computer working/connected to function as one.
Definition/ meaning of computer system.
Stage 3
Full class discussion (10 mins)
The teacher asks learners to mention all the parts that are interconnected in the picture above.
Teacher writes learners comments on the board.


The teacher writes learners comments on the board. The teacher may engage learners in other group activities that will lead learners to mention/ list the components of the computer system. Such as;
  1. Name the parts that can be seen, touch and feel.
  2. Name the parts you leant from your previous lesson that can not be seen, touch and feel, but also helps in the functionality of the computer.
  3. Can the computer operate itself?
    If yes, how does it operates itself?
    If no, who operates it?
  4. Give reasons for your answers.
Learners expected to respond.
  1. Parts of the computer that can be seen, feel and touch are:
    • The monitor.
    • The system unit.
    • The Keyboard.
    • The mouse.
    • The printer.
    • The speakers.
  2. Parts of the computer that cannot be seen, touch and feel are:
    • The system Softwares
    • Utility Softwares
    • Application Softwares
  3. No, The computer cannot operates itself, The computer is operated by its user.
Developing the idea of the component of the computer system.
Teacher asks learners in group activities:
  • The parts/components of the computer that can be seen, touch and feels are called what?
  • The parts/components of the computer that cannot be seen, touch or feels are called what?
Learners expected response:
  • The parts of the computer that can be seen, touch and feels are called HARDWARE
  • The parts of the computer that cannot be seen, touch and feels are called SOFTWARES

The teacher gives the class a prompt (the computer system is made up of three distinct components) and gets learners to discuss their views in group activities.


Teachers to ensure that learners engage in active discussion or debate in their group and arrive at their own opinion.

Learners expected response:
  1. The hardware components.
  2. The software components.
  3. The user/human ware/peopleware.

Learners are enthusiastic to speak up and make attempt.


Components of the computer system.
Evaluation. Full class session (10 mins) Ask the following questions to evaluate the achievement of the set objectives.
  1. What is a computer system?
  2. List the components of the computer system.
Learners expected response:
  1. The computer system is interrelated parts of the computer connected to function as one.
  2. components of the computer system include:
    1. The hardware components
    2. The software components
    3. The user
Confirming the achievement of the set objectives.
Conclusion, full class session (3 mins) The teacher asks learners, all parts of the computer are connected to ____ part/unit for processing? Learners expected response.

Learners concluded the lesson that all parts of the computer are connected to the system unit.

Acquiring/ improving understanding of computer systems.
ASSIGNMENT The teacher gives learners a take home.
  1. What is a computer system?
  2. List the component of the computer system.
  3. Draw and label the computer system.
Learners answer other questions. Improving their level of understanding of computer systems.

ASEI PDSI Lesson Plan On Basic Science & Technology

Plants & Animals

Subject: Basic Science & Technology

Theme: Living & non-living things

Topic: Plants & animals

Sub Topic: Living & Non-living

Date: dd/mm/yyyy

Class: Basic Three

Duration: 35 Minutes

No of Learners: 30

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
  1. Group the living and non-living in their environment.

  2. Living things Non-living things
    Goat Sand
    Sheep River
    Ant Stone
    Lizard Rock
    Plant Book
    Tree Desk
  3. List differences between Living & Non-living things

  4. Living things Non-living things
    They can move from one place to another without force (i.e on their own). They can only be made to move from place to place (i.e with a force).
    They eat (feed). They do not eat (feed).
    They breathe in air. They do not breathe in air.
    They can grow. They do not grow.
    They produce young ones. They do not produce young ones.
    They can die. They do not die.

Rationale:

In the world, living and non-living things constitute two large groups. Almost everything we come across in life can be grouped either as a living thing or a non-living thing. Therefore, there is a need to teach our learners about living and non-living things since our world constitute living and non-living things.

Prerequisite/ Previous knowledge:

Learners have learnt what an environment is.

Learning Materials:

Chart of an environment, chart of living & non-living things.

Reference Materials:

Basic Science and Technology for Primary Schools Pupils' Book 3 by P. Asun, S. T. Bajah et al.

Lesson Development:

STAGE
TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
LEARNING POINTS
INTRODUCTION
full class session (3 mins)
Teacher asks learners to defined an environment in their own words. Learners defined an environment in their own words.

    An environment is the natural surroundings in which we live.

Confirming the previous lesson.
DEVELOPMENT Step 1. Group Work (2 mins) The teacher guides the learners to form four groups and ask them to choose their leaders and secretaries. Learners choose their group leaders and secretaries. Inculcating leadership skills, competitive spirit, cooperation, teamwork and a sense of responsibility among learners.
INTRODUCTION Step 2 Full class session (7 mins) The teacher asks learners, what can they see in your environment? Learners expected response;
Compound, plants, houses, road, chair, birds, rivers, mountain, rocks, sand, persons, schools, board, marker, rulers, books etc.
Developing the ideas of living things & non-living things and introducing the topic of living things and non-living things.
The teacher gives each group a chart containing pictures of living things and non-living things and asks learners to group what they see in the chart into living and non-living things.
Teacher to give affirmation and compliment learners for their good effort.
Learners expected to respond;
Living things Non-living things
Cow canoe
Woman River
Ant aeroplane
Butterfly Rock
Plant Book
Tree Desk
Grouping of living and non-living things
Stage 3
Full class discussion (10 mins)
The teacher asks learners to give reasons why they feel the things they listed under living things are living things and that which they listed under non-living things are non-living things.
The teacher writes learners comments on the board.


The teacher may engage learners in an activity that will lead learners to list properties of living things and non-living things, such as,
  1. asking learners to breathe in and out.
  2. asking learners to come and go.
  3. asking learners if they have eaten or not, or if they eat.
  4. asking learners if they have seen young ones of animals and human beings.
  5. asking learners if they have ever seen or heard of dead animals or human beings. Etc.
Learners raised their hands to give reasons for their decision.
  1. Living things move without force while non-living things can only move with a force.
  2. Living things eat while non-living things do not eat.
  3. Living things breathe in air while non-living things do not breathe in air.
  4. Living things grow while non-living things do not grow.
  5. Living produce young ones while non-living things do not produces young ones.
  6. Living things die while non-living things do not die.
Developing the idea of the differences between living things and non-living things.
Evaluation. Full class session (10 mins) Ask the following questions to evaluate the achievement of the set objectives.
  1. Group the things in the school environment as living and non-living.
  2. List three differences between living and non-living things.
Learners expected response:
  1. Living things Non-living things
    Pupils Books
    Teachers Pen
    Flowers Classroom
    Birds Board
    Trees Marker
    Friends Bucket
    Guidance Buildings
  2. Living things Non-living things
    They eat. They do not eat.
    They breathe in air. They do not breathe in air.
    They grow. They do not grow.
Confirming the achievement of the set objectives.
Conclusion, full class session (3 mins) Ask learners to classify boys, sheep, maize, tomato, teacher, birds, grass, girls, and dog into human beings, plants and animals. Learners expected response.
Human beings Plants Animals
Boys maize Sheep
Teacher Tomato Birds
Girls Grass Dog

Learners concluded the lesson that living things can be classified into Human beings, Animals or Plants.

Acquiring/ improving understanding of living things and non-living things in the environment.
ASSIGNMENT The teacher gives learners a take home.
  1. List five examples of living things in your environment.
  2. Is uniform a living thing? give three reasons for your answer.
Learners answer other questions. Improving their level of understanding of living things and non-living things.

Teaching Method in Futher Mathematics

Asei Lesson Plan on Further Maths - Matrices

Subject: Futher Mathematics

Theme: Matrices

Topic: Matrices

Sub Topic: Basic Concepts of Matrices

Date: dd/mm/yyyy

Class: SSS 3

Duration: 35 Minutes

No of Learners: 30

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
  1. Defined Matrices

  2. A Matrix is a rectangular array of numbers or elements that are enclosed within brackets. E.g.

    • Example of Matrices
  3. Describe the elements, row, column and order of matrices.

  4. E.g.
    • Element, Row, Column and Order of Matrices

    NOTE: In describing the matrix, the number of rows is started first and the number of columns second. In general, a matrix with m-rows and n-columns is said to have an order of mxn.
    A matrix with only one row of elements is called a row or line matrix. E.g. ( 4   8   -2   0   5 ), while a matrix with only one column of elements is called a column matrix.

  5. Identify and describe the notation of a matrix. e.g

    • Notation of matrices
  6. Solve questions on Equality of Matrices.


  7. Two matrices are said to be equal if corresponding elements throughout are equal. The two matrices must also be of the same order. E.g.

    • Equality of matrices

Rationale:

In computer-based applications, matrices play a vital role in the projection of three-dimensional images into a two-dimensional screen, creating realistic seeming motions. Digital Images have spaced collections of pixels or image elements arranged in 2d space and in computers they are represented as Matrices. These matrices contain different values of integers which represent the level of brightness or intensity or similar properties. It is therefore important for students to be taught Matrices.

Prerequisite/ Previous knowledge:

Learners have learnt the Binary format for communication by the computer.


Learning Materials:

Pictures of encryption of message codes, binary format for communication, colour pixel used by the computer.


Reference Materials:

  1. Further Mathematics Project 3 by Tuttuh-Adegun, M.R. Sivasubramaniam, S. Adegoke, R
  2. Engineering Mathematics by K. A. Stroud


Lesson Development:

STAGE
TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
LEARNING POINTS
INTRODUCTION
full class session (5mins)
The teacher asks learners to identify the following picture on the board.
  • Binary code
Through question and answer teacher guides the learners to solve the following binary matrix format for communication by the computer to Decimal Equivalent in Human understanding.
  1. 0001
  2. 0010
  3. 0011
  4. 0100
  5. 0101
  6. 0110
  7. 0111
  8. 1000
  9. 1001
  10. 110101
Learners expected to respond;

The diagram on the board is a Binary Matrix.

  1. 0001 = (0*2^3) + (0*2^2) + ( 0*2^1) + ( 1*2^0) = 1
  2. 0010 = (0*2^3) + (0*2^2) + ( 1*2^1) + ( 0*2^0) = 2
  3. 0011 = (0*2^3) + (0*2^2) + ( 1*2^1) + ( 1*2^0) = 3
  4. 0100 = (0*2^3) + (1*2^2) + ( 0*2^1) + ( 0*2^0) = 4
  5. 0101 = (0*2^3) + (1*2^2) + ( 0*2^1) + ( 1*2^0) = 5
  6. 0110 = (0*2^3) + (1*2^2) + ( 1*2^1) + ( 0*2^0) = 6
  7. 0111 = (0*2^3) + (1*2^2) + ( 1*2^1) + ( 1*2^0) = 7
  8. 1000 = (1*2^3) + (0*2^2) + ( 0*2^1) + ( 0*2^0) = 8
  9. 1001 = (0*2^3) + (1*2^2) + ( 1*2^1) + ( 0*2^0) = 9
  10. 110101 = (1*2^5) + (1*2^4) + ( 0*2^3) + ( 1*2^2) + ( 0*2^1) + ( 1*2^0) = 53
Learner’s entry points.

NOTE:
* means Times (x)
^ means to rise to power.

DEVELOPMENT Step 1. Group Work (2 mins) The teacher guides the learners to form four groups and ask them to choose their leaders and secretaries. Learners choose their group leaders and secretaries. Inculcating leadership skills, competitive spirit, cooperation, teamwork and a sense of responsibility among learners.
Step 2 Full class session (7mins) The teacher should explain the importance & application of matrices as used by the computer to process data and give out information e.g in graphics presentation, communication etc, this will enable learners to develop interest & appreciate the concepts of the topic.


Guide learners in activities that lead them to the definition of a matrix, element of matrix, row, column and order of the matrix. The teacher gives the four groups a printout of RGB (Red Green Blue) colour code.
  • RGB colour code
  • Concept of Matrix
and ask them to explain or describe the figure placed before them.
Teacher to encourage vibrant brainstorm of ideas and facilitate students’ participation and clarify or render help if necessary in the activity.

Learners expected response;
  1. An array of numbers.
  2. A set of real or complex numbers ( or elements) arranged in rows and columns.
Developing the definition of a matrix from the activity.
The teacher then tell learners that the figure with the brackets are matrices and ask learners to define matrix in their own words. Learners expected to respond.
  1. A matrix is a set of real or complex numbers ( or elements) arranged in rows and columns within brackets to form a rectangular array.
  2. A matrix is a rectangular array of numbers that are enclosed within brackets.
Definition of Matrix.
The teacher then asks learners to identify the elements, numbers of rows, numbers of columns and order in each matrix in the figures above.

The teacher should inform learners that in describing the matrix, the number of rows is started first and the number of columns second. In general, a matrix with m-rows and n-columns is said to have an order of mxn.

Also, A matrix with only one row of elements is called a row or line matrix. E.g. figure 1.3 is a line or row matrix.

A matrix with only one column of elements is called a column matrix. E.g. figure 1.2 is a column matrix.

Learners expected to respond.
  • Figure 1.2:
    the elements are 58, 180 and 157.
    it has three rows and one column.
    has an order of 3x1 read "three by one".
  • Figure 1.3:
    the elements are 3, 13 and 3.
    it has one row and three columns.
    has an order of 1x3 read "one by three".
  • Figure 1.4:
    the elements are 1, 2, 4, 3, 7, 3, 0, 1, and 5
    it has three rows and three columns.
    has an order of 3x3 read "three by three".
  • Figure 1.5:
    the elements are 5, 0, 1, 9, -3 and 8.
    it has two rows and three columns.
    has an order of 2x3 read "two by three".
Identifying the elements, rows, columns and order of matrices.
Stage 3
Full class discussion (10 mins)
The teacher guides learners to identify the notation of each element in the matrix below.
  • Notation of Element
The teacher explains to learners that the matrix.
  • Notation of Elements
is denoted by bold faces capital letters, while the elements of the matrix are denoted by small letters with a suffix that uniquely defined the exact positions of each element in the array.
Learners follow the teacher's procedures to identify and list the notation of each element in the matrix.
  1. A is the matrix.
  2. a11 is the element of A in the first row and first column.
  3. a12 is the element of A in the first row and second column.
  4. a21 is the element of A in the second row and first column.
  5. a22 is the element of A in the second row and second column.
Identifying and describing the notation of an element of a matrix.
The teacher guides learners to solve the following question.
  • Equality of matrix

The teacher explains to learners that two matrices are said to be equal if corresponding elements throughout are equal. hence, the two matrices must also be of the same order.
learners expected to respond; SolutionSince the two matrices are equal, their corresponding elements are equal.
  • a = 5
  • b = 7
  • c = 1
  • d = -3
  • Equality of matrices.
    Evaluation. Full class session (10 mins) Ask the following questions to evaluate the achievement of the set objectives.
    1. What is a matrix?
    2. List the elements of (iii) and determine the order of (i), (ii), (iii), (iv) in the following matrices.
      • Evaluation
    3. Given that,
      • Evaluation
    4. Find;
      1. a11
      2. a32
      3. b21
      4. c23
      If C = A and not equal to B what is the value of,
      1. p
      2. z
      3. x
      4. r
      5. s
      6. i
      If B = C and not equal to A what is the value of,
      1. p
      2. z
      3. x
      4. r
      5. s
      6. i
    Learners expected response:
    1. A Matrix is a rectangular array of numbers or elements that are enclosed within brackets.

    2. The elements of (iii) are;
      4, -2, -6, and 1.
    Order of;
    • (i) 3x2
    • (ii) 1x4
    • (iii) 4x1
    • (iv) 3x3
    1. a11 = 0
    2. a32 = 1
    3. b21 = 7
    4. c23 = 1
      If C = A
    1. p = 0
    2. z = 3
    3. x = -9
    4. r = 0
    5. s = 7
    6. i = -4
      If B = C
    1. p = 4
    2. z = 0
    3. x = 7
    4. r = -1
    5. s = 3
    6. i = -2
    Confirming the achievement of the set objectives.
    Conclusion, full class session (3 mins) Ask learners,
    • Conclusion
    Learners expected response.

    Matrices that have the same order are said to be equal if their corresponding elements are equal.
    x = 8 and y = 1

    Acquiring/ improving understanding of the Basic Concepts Matrices.
    ASSIGNMENT The teacher gives learners a take home.
    • Conclusion
    1. What is the order of the matrices (i) and (ii) above?
    2. Locate the following in matrix (i) above; (a) 3, (b) -1, (c) 9
    3. Find the values of a, y and k in figure (iii) above.
    Learners answer other questions. Improving their level of understanding of Matrices.

    ASEI Lesson Plan On English Language

    Verbs

    Subject: English Language

    Theme: Parts of Speech

    Topic: Verbs

    Sub Topic: Classification of Verbs 1- Transitive & Intransitive Verbs

    Date: dd/mm/yyyy

    Class: Basic Four

    Duration: 35 Minutes

    No of Learners: 30

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
    1. Say what verbs are.

      Verbs are doing words, i.e a verb shows what we are doing, it shows action.

    2. List types/ classification of verbs.

      1. Transitive Verbs: These are verbs whose actions can be passed to something and person in sentences. i.e they require an object to make meaning. E.g
        The Teacher finished his scheme yesterday.
        Here, the teacher did something; FINISHED, and finished was passed into something; SCHEME. Hence, finished is a transitive verb, while his scheme is the direct object.
      2. Intransitive Verbs: These verbs do not require objects to make their meanings complete. The action they express is not passed to an object or person. E.g. All dogs bark.
        Here, all dogs do something; BARK, and bark was not passed into anything or person. Hense, bark is intransitive verb.

    Rationale:

    Verbs are the compulsory element in sentences, verbs express the actions which nouns and pronouns perform in sentences. Verbs also express conditions or states of being of nouns and pronouns. Therefore, there is a need to teach our learners about verbs since verbs are very important words in the English Language.

    Language Area or Skill:

    • Grammar
    • Vocabulary
    • Writing
    • Reading
    • Speaking

    Prerequisite/ Previous knowledge:

    Students have been taught parts of speech.

    Learning Materials:

    Webster's Encyclopaedic Dictionary, Concise Oxford English Dictionary, Flashcard, One copy of each page of the student worksheet per learner. A whiteboard and pens.

    Reference Materials:

    Nigeria Primary English Pupils’ Book 4 By F Ademola-Adeoye, Q Adam, B Somoye et al.

    Lesson Development:

    STAGE
    TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNING POINTS
    INTRODUCTION
    full class session (5mins)
    The teacher asks the learners to recite the parts of speech of the English Language. Learners recite the eight parts of speech of the English language.
    1. Nouns
    2. Pronouns
    3. Verbs
    4. Adjectives
    5. Adverbs
    6. Prepositions
    7. Conjunctions
    8. Interjections
    Revising the previous lesson and reciting the eight parts of speech.
    DEVELOPMENT Step 1. Group Work (2 mins) The teacher guides the learners to form four groups and ask them to choose their leaders and secretaries. Learners choose their group leaders and secretaries. Inculcating leadership skills, competitive spirit, cooperation, teamwork and a sense of responsibility among learners.
    Step 2 Full class session (7mins) Guide learners in activities that lead them to the definition of a verb. The teacher gives the four groups flashcards, and ask them to act and not to say what they saw in the flash card. Let every group act out what they saw in their flashcards consecutively.
    The teacher should let the rest of the class say out what each group is acting.
    The teaching explains to the learner that each of them just did something, each of them acted something, each of the just acted, that is, performed an action. some of you dance, others cried, some sing etc.
    This acting or doing or action is called a verb.
    Learners expected response;
    1. Group saw dancing in the flashcard and acted dancing.
      The rest of the class says what they are doing; DANCING
    2. Group saw sleeping in the flashcard and acted sleeping.
      The rest of the class says what they are doing; SLEEPING
    3. Group saw singing in the flashcard and acted singing.
      The rest of the class says what they are doing; SINGING
    4. Group saw crying in the flashcard and acted crying.
      The rest of the class says what they are doing; CRYING
    5. Group saw clapping in the flashcard and acted clapping.
      The rest of the class says what they are doing; CLAPPING
    6. Group saw writing in the flashcard and acted writing.
      The rest of the class says what they are doing; WRITING etc.
    Developing the meaning of verbs from the activity.
    The teacher asks learners to define verbs in their own words Learners expected to respond;
    A verb is a doing word.
    Definition of verbs
    Stage 3
    Full class discussion (10 mins)
    The Teacher writes two sentences on the board and asks learners to read them out and identify the verbs in the sentences.
    1. The teacher cane Andrew.
    2. Babies smile.

    Teacher to give affirmation and compliment learners for their good effort.
    The teacher thereafter explains to learners that smile & cane are verbs, however, are different type of verb as used in the sentence. That is, a verb can be classified into one group or class based on how it is used in a sentence.
    Learners read the sentences and identify the verbs.
    1. Cane
    2. Smile.
    Developing the idea of classification of verbs.
    The teacher explains the action performed in the sentences above by asking the learners questions.
    • In the first sentence, the teacher did what?
    • The cane was used on who?
    • In the second sentence, Babies do what?
    • Was the smile transfer to something or a person?

    The teacher explains to learners that since the verb 'Cane' in the first sentence was transferred to something or somebody, this type of verb is called Transitive Verb. Since the verb 'Smile' was not passed to something or person, this type of verb is called Intransitive Verb
    learners expected respond;
    • Cane
    • Andrew
    • Smile
    • No
    Developing the idea of Transitive & Intransitive Verbs.
    The teacher asks learners to defined Transitive and Intransitive Verbs in their own words. Learners expected to respond;
    • Transitive verbs are verbs whose actions can be passed to something or a person in sentences.
    • Intransitive verbs are verbs whose actions are not passed to other things or people.
    Defining transitive verbs and intransitive verbs.
    Evaluation. Full class session (10 mins) Ask the following questions to evaluate the achievement of the set objectives.
    1. What is a verb?
    2. Underline the verbs in the following sentences.
      1. We tear the paper.
      2. She wins again.
      3. I see the sunshine.
      4. Joe climbed slowly.
      5. Eze is very generous.
    3. Identify the Transitive verbs and Intransitive verbs in the following sentences.
      1. Peter loves reading.
      2. The Child cried.
      3. Snail crawl.
      4. The hunter kills the grasscutter.
      5. He runs.
    Learners expected response:
    1. A verb is a doing/ action word that nouns and pronouns perform in sentences.
    2. We tear the paper

    3. she wins again.
    4. I see sunshine.
    5. Joe climbed slowly.
    6. Eze is very generous.

    7. Peter loves reading. loves is Transitive Verb
    8. The Child cried. cried is Intransitive Verb
    9. Snail crawl. crawl is Intransitive Verb
    10. The hunter kills the grasscutter. kills is Transitive Verb
    11. He runs. runs is Intransitive Verb
    Confirming the achievement of the set objectives.
    Conclusion, full class session (3 mins) Ask learners to make simple sentences with DANCE as a Transitive verb and Intransitive verb. Learners expected response.
    1. Children dance at the party. dance is Transitive Verb
    2. children dance. dance is Intransitive Verb
    Some verbs can function as both transitive and intransitive verbs, it is the way that they are used that determines the class they belong to.
    Acquiring/ improving understanding of transitive and intransitive verbs.
    ASSIGNMENT The teacher gives learners a take home. Underline the verbs in the following sentences also indicate if it is a Transitive verb or Intransitive verb.
    1. The birds flew.
    2. Mr Alex teaches us, French.
    3. The baby slept soundly.
    4. Lions roar.
    5. My father can kill a lion.
    6. Drugs cures and kills.
    Learners answer other questions. Improving their level of understanding of verbs.

    ASEI Lesson Plan On English Language

    Common Errors To Be Avoided When Speaking & Writing English Language

    Subject: English Language

    Theme: Preposition

    Topic: Appropriate Uses of English Propositions

    Sub Topic: Common Errors To Be Avoided When Speaking & Writing English

    Date: dd/mm/yyyy

    Class: S.S.S 3

    Duration: 35 Minutes

    No of Learners: 30

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
    1. understand the appropriate use of the preposition.

    2. write and speak in clear, formal English, as is generally demanded in an academic context.

    3. correct errors that are often found or made in speaking and writing the English Language.

    Rationale:

    Errors are often found with the use of prepositions in students' when they speak and write English Language, such errors are also found in students' answers in the comprehension, summary, essays and letters, aspects of the examination. Therefore, there is a need to teach our students these errors for their essays and letters, speaking and writing to be more authentic and persuasive.

    Language Area or Skill:

    • Grammar
    • Vocabulary
    • Writing
    • Reading
    • Speaking

    Prerequisite/ Previous knowledge:

    Students have been taught Preposition and Concord

    Learning Materials:

    Webster's Encyclopaedic Dictionary, Concise Oxford English Dictionary, Journal, One copy of each page of the student worksheet per student. A whiteboard and pens.

    Reference Materials:

    New Oxford Secondary English Course SSS 3 By Ayo Banjo et al.
    New Concept English for Senior Secondary School 3 (Revised Edition) by F. Ademola-Adeoye & others.
    Webster's Encyclopaedic Dictionary, & Concise Oxford English Dictionary

    Lesson Development:

    STAGE
    TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNING POINTS
    INTRODUCTION: Pre-lesson (conducted before study lesson)
    full class session (5 mins)
    Lead-in activity.

    Begin by inviting the class to discuss the topic of Preposition and Concord. Establish whether the students have an understanding of the position of a preposition in grammatical constructions/ sentences if students have an understanding of the word concord, singular subject, singular verb, and singular adjective, plural subject, plural verb, and plural adjective and if so, ask them to give an example with a sentence or fill in the gap with the most appropriate word or words given in the bracket. If not, provide an example from the student worksheet.
    Teacher to encourage vibrant brainstorm of ideas and facilitate students’ participation

    • I prefer rice _______ beans. (more, than, to, for)
    • Who knocked _____ the Door? (on, at, in, to)
    • John _______ rice weekly (eat, eats, eaten, ate, eating)
    • Peter and Paul _______ every day (enjoy, enjoys, enjoyed, have enjoy, has enjoy)
    • To treat Mary and Martha as criminals ______ unfair (are, is, was, were, have been)
    • The panel _______ submitted _______ report (have/it, has/its, have/its, has/it, have/is)
    • The panel _______ submitted _______ report (have/their, has/their, have/his, has/her, have/him)
    • Oliver Twins ______ an interesting novel (are, is, were, has been, have been)

    Students respond to the teacher's question.

    • Preposition show the relationships between two or more things.
    • Concord is an agreement between the forms of words. For a sentence to be grammatical and acceptable, its subject must agree in number with its verb.
    • I prefer rice to beans.
    • Who knocked at the Door?
    • John eats rice weekly
    • Peter and Paul enjoy every day
    • To treat Mary and Martha as criminals is unfair
    • The panel has submitted its report
    • The panel have submitted their report
    • Oliver Twins is an interesting novel (are, is, were, has been, have been)

    Revising the previous lesson

    Students can explain the understanding of the word preposition and concord, singular subject, a singular verb, and singular adjective, plural subject, plural verb, and plural adjective.

    DEVELOPMENT Step 1. Group Work (2 mins) The teacher guides the learners to form four groups and ask them to choose their leaders and secretaries. Learners choose their group leaders and secretaries. Inculcating leadership skills, competitive spirit, cooperation, teamwork and a sense of responsibility among learners.
    Stage 2
    Full class discussion (5 mins)

    The teacher gives the class a prompt;

      Write a letter to your friend, identifying:
    • your salutation?
    • complimentary close?
    and get students to discuss their views with their peers in their group
    The teacher to ensure that students engage in active discussion or debate with their peers and arrive at their own opinion.

    Students may say

    • Dear friend,
    • Yours lovely,
      James.

    Students are enthusiastic to speak up and give suggestions

    The teacher goes through learners work and correct where necessary.

    • Dear Peter,
    • Your loving friend,
      Thomas.
    • 'Dear friend' is not acceptable because you are supposed to write what you would have said if you were in physical contact with your friend.
    • You always call your friend's name anytime you want to get his or her attention.
    • Write the person's name so that your salutation will be true to life.
    • Do not indent i.e leave a space because it is not a paragraph.

    Teacher to give further examples of prepositions attached to certain words in writing and speaking for students to reinforce the concept of the topic.
    • abide .............. by
    • absorbed .............. In
    • abstain .............. from
    • Accomplice .............. with
    • accused .............. (Sb) of (sth)
    • accustomed .............. To

    Students correct their mistakes and listen to the teacher.

    Developing ideas on the concept of common errors in speaking and writing English and introducing the topic.
    Stage 3
    Full class discussion (10 mins)
    The Teacher gives more examples of prepositional phrases and guides learners to make simple sentences with them.
    1. addicted........ To
    2. adhere........ To
    3. admit........to/into
    4. advantage....... Over (sb) of (sth)
    5. affection.......... For
    6. afflicted........ With
    7. afraid......... of
    8. agree.......... To (proposal)
    9. agree..... With (a person) about/on sth
    10. aim .......at
    11. aloof........from
    12. alternative......... To
    Learners make sentences with prepositional phrases.
    1. She had become addicted to golf.
    2. I have adhered strictly to the rules .
    3. Paul admitted to me that he sometimes feels jealous of my friendship with Stanley.

      The narrow windows admit little light into the room.

    4. His height gives him an advantage over the other players.

      I took advantage of the good weather to paint the shed.

    5. she had a deep affection for her parents
    6. He is afflicted with cancer.
    7. The Government is afraid of losing the election
    8. You and I are going to have to agree to disagree then.

      I can't agree to the terms of this contract

    9. I agree with every word you've just said

      I agree about going on a holiday

      Are we all agreed on this?

    10. We aim at pleasing everyone.
    11. The Government is keeping aloof from the controversy
    12. New ways to treat arthritis may provide an alternative to painkillers.
    Being able to understand common errors with
    • addicted........ To
    • adhere........ To
    • admit........to/into
    • advantage....... Over (sb) of (sth)
    • affection.......... For
    • afflicted........ With
    • afraid......... of
    • agree.......... To (proposal)
    • agree..... With (a person) about/on sth
    • aim .......at
    • aloof........from
    • alternative......... To
    in writing and speaking.
    Evaluation. Full class session (10 mins) Ask the following questions to evaluate the achievement of the lesson.
      Fill in the gap with the most appropriate word in the box.
    1. I was amazed _____ her knowledge of French literature. (on, at, by, with)
    2. She had been very angry ______ the person who stole her new bike.(about, at, to, on)
    3. she was angry _____ the delay. (at, with, by, about)
    4. We were anxious _____ you. (for, at, with, on)
    5. She was anxious ______ her friend's illness. (about, for, with, at)
    6. He apologized _____ the people who had been affected. (for, to, at, on)
    7. He later apologized ____his behaviour. (for, to, at, on)
    Learners expected response:
    1. I was amazed at her knowledge of French literature.
    2. She had been very angry at the person who stole her new bike
    3. she was angry about the delay
    4. We were anxious for you.
    5. She was anxious about her friend's illness.
    6. He apologized to the people who had been affected.
    7. He later apologized for his behaviour.
    Confirming the achievement of the set objectives.
    Conclusion, full class session (3mins) Ask learners to make simple sentences with
    1. appeal as regard (sb) and (sth)
    Learners expected response.
    1. They needed to appeal to his sense of justice
    2. The idea of a vacation appeals to me
    3. The film has great appeal for young audiences.
    4. An appeal for help.
    Acquiring/ improving understanding of the prepositional phrase.
    ASSIGNMENT The teacher gives learners a take-home of prepositional phrase worksheet to study and ask learners to make a simple sentence with each word. Learners answer other questions. Improving their level of understanding of the Prepositional Phrase.

    Worksheet on Prepositional phrase

    1. appetite..... For
    2. approach........to
    3. akin........to
    4. acclimatize........ To
    5. apparent.... To(sb)
    6. apparent...... From(sth)
    7. appoint.......(sb)to(sth)
    8. apply........ To(sb)for(sth)
    9. appropriate... To/for
    10. approve..............of
    11. aptitude............ For
    12. ashamed......... Of
    13. aspire.................to
    14. assent...............to
    15. associate........with
    16. dissociate......from
    17. assure...............of
    18. astonished........ At
    19. atone............. For.
    20. attached..............to
    21. attend..................to
    22. attribute......(sth) to (sth/sb)
    23. authority........Over (power)
    24. authority............ On (expert)
    25. avail.........(oneself)of(sth)
    26. averse.................to
    27. ban(n)..............On
    28. ban(v)...........(sb)from(sth/doing sth)
    29. bad..........at(not good at)
    30. bad...for (harmful)
    31. believe.............in
    32. beneficial.......... To
    33. benefit......by/from
    34. blame.............(sb/sth)for(sth).
    35. boast................of
    36. bound............... For
    37. burden(n)......... To
    38. burden(v)........with
    39. busy.................with
    40. bearing.............. On
    41. campaign........... Against/for
    42. capable........... Of
    43. concern.............. For/about
    44. carefu.....about/for
    45. caution............ About/against
    46. charge.......... With
    47. claim............on/to
    48. clash........... With(sb)over(sth)
    49. collide..............with
    50. Collude......with(sb)in(sth)
    51. comment.........on
    52. compare......to (to show likeliness)
    53. compare ..............with (to show contrast)
    54. compassion..... For
    55. compatible...... With
    56. compensation..... For
    57. compliance.... With
    58. compliment...... On
    59. comply.......... With
    60. conducive......... To
    61. confide....in (trust)
    62. confide.....to (tell)
    63. confidence........In
    64. confident..... Of/about
    65. confined.......... (Sb/sth)to(sth)
    66. conform............To
    67. conformity...... With
    68. congenial......... To
    69. congratulate......... (Sb)on(sth)
    70. connect.......(sth)to(sth)
    71. consent............. To
    72. consist................of
    73. contemporary...... With
    74. contempt..... For
    75. contend....... with
    76. contend.....for
    77. content.........with
    78. contrary.............to
    79. control....... Over
    80. connive........at/in(sth)
    81. connive...with(sb)
    82. close...........to
    83. complain....to(sb)about/of(sth)
    84. crash............into
    85. convenient......... For(sb/sth)
    86. converse...... With
    87. convict........... (Sb)of(sth)
    88. cure(v).......(sb)of(sth)
    89. cure(n).............for
    90. concern(n...about/for/over.
    91. concerned (adj)........about/for/over (worried)
    92. concerned (adj).......about/with (interested in)
    93. deal......in(trade)
    94. deal.......with(to take appropriate action).
    95. delight.............in
    96. depend...On/upon
    97. deprive..........(sb/sth)of(sth)
    98. desist......... From
    99. destitute...........of
    100. detrimental...... To
    101. deviate........ From
    102. devoid........ Of
    103. differ.......from(sb/sth)
    104. differ...with(sb) about/on/over(sth)
    105. different........... From/to/than
    106. disgusted.......... At/by/with
    107. dispense...... With
    108. dispose.............of
    109. die...........of (person died of accident).
    110. Die.......with(disease) person died with cancer
    111. Die.........for(purpose) person died for country/organization.
    112. dissent.........from
    113. dote........... On/upon
    114. double (n)/doubtful (adj)........about
    115. drenched....... In/with
    116. decline......... In/of
    117. eager............ For
    118. eligible.......... For
    119. engaged......... In/on(sth)
    120. engaged....... To(sb )
    121. enthusiasm.......... For/about
    122. entrust......(sb)with(sth)
    123. entrust.......(sth)to(sb)
    124. envious/jealous......Of
    125. envy...............at
    126. entitle/entitlement.....To
    127. equal........... To
    128. escape....... From
    129. essential... To/for
    130. excel............at/in
    131. exception........ To
    132. excuse.......... (Sb) for (sth)
    133. excuse........ For (reason)
    134. exemption...From
    135. expose.........(sth)to (sb)
    136. encroach..........on/upon
    137. expect....... (Sth)from (sb)
    138. fail. ...............in
    139. faith................. In
    140. faithful............. To
    141. famous........ For
    142. fearful..... For (sb)
    143. fearful...... Of(sth)
    144. feed/live.....on(eat)
    145. fight....... With(sb)about/for (sth)
    146. fill ........(sth)with(sth).
    147. fill..............in(sth)
    148. fit/unfit...........For
    149. fond.................of
    150. fondness........ For
    151. free.........from/of
    152. frightened........ At
    153. full................of
    154. fuss...about/over
    155. fed up...........with
    156. glad.......about (happy)
    157. glad.......of(greatful)
    158. glance............ At
    159. good......at (able to do sth well)skillful
    160. good.............for (suitable) convenient
    161. grapple....... With
    162. greatful.......to(sb)for(sth)
    163. grief....... At/over
    164. grieve.....for/over
    165. guard.......Against
    166. guilty........ about
    167. guilty........ of (having done sth illegal)
    168. harmful/injurious.....To
    169. heir...........to ( sth)
    170. heir..........of (sb)
    171. hint.............at
    172. hope........... For
    173. hope...........for/of
    174. hopeful........... About/of
    175. hostile............. To
    176. habit......of(doing sth)
    177. identical....... With
    178. ignorant......... About/of
    179. impact..... of(sb)on(sth/sb)
    180. impose........... On
    181. impress....... (Sb) with(sth)
    182. impression......... On(sb)
    183. impression..... Of(sth)
    184. impressed....with/by
    185. independent... of
    186. indifferent/callous......to
    187. indispensable...... To(sb/sth)
    188. indispensable........ For(doing sth)
    189. infected........ With
    190. infer..............from
    191. influence..... Over(control)
    192. influence........ On/upon(effect)
    193. inform.............. of
    194. inquiry.......about/into
    195. insight......... Into
    196. insist..............on
    197. insistence.......on
    198. interact......... With
    199. interaction......... With (sb/sth)
    200. interaction....... Between (two things or persons)
    201. interested....... In
    202. interfere......... In (get involved)
    203. interfere........ With (prevent)
    204. invest................in
    205. involved............in
    206. irrelevant........ To
    207. irrespective..... of
    208. meddle........... In
    209. keen................on
    210. kind/cruel.......to
    211. lack...................of
    212. lacking...............in
    213. lament...........over
    214. laugh................ At
    215. lead.................to
    216. leave..........for(a place, go to)
    217. liable....... For (legally responsible for paying the cost of)
    218. liable........ To (likely to be punished by law for)
    219. listen............. To
    220. longing (n)/long(v)..........for
    221. look/stare/gaze.......at
    222. lust...................for
    223. .march..............on
    224. married.............to
    225. marvel...............at
    226. meditate/concentrate......on
    227. mourn............ For
    228. nag....................at
    229. need/necessity....For
    230. negligent.......... In
    231. nervous...About/of
    232. notorious....... For
    233. obedient.......... To
    234. object/objection.....to
    235. oblige.....(sb)with(sth)
    236. obliged..... To(sb)for (sth)
    237. obsession.....with
    238. obsessive... About
    239. open...... To(sb/sth)
    240. opportunity......for(sb/sth)
    241. opportunity......for/of(doing sth)
    242. part...............from
    243. part......with (to give sth to sb else)
    244. partial............. To
    245. partially...For(sth)
    246. passion...........for
    247. pertain..............to
    248. persist.....in(doing sth)
    249. persist........in/with(sth)
    250. pleased........With
    251. pleasing......... To
    252. popular......... With
    253. pray......to(sb)for(sth)
    254. prefer...... (Sb/sth)to(sb/sth)
    255. preferable........ To
    256. pretext............for
    257. prevail......on (persuad)
    258. prevail.......over (defeat)
    259. prevent....... From
    260. pride............. In
    261. prior............... To
    262. prohibit.........from
    263. prone.............. To
    264. proud............... Of
    265. provide..... (Sb)with(sth)
    266. provide......(sth)fo(sb)
    267. pessimistic...... About
    268. positive.......About
    269. quarrel........About(sth)
    270. quarrel.... With(sb)
    271. ready............ For
    272. reconcile..... To(sth)
    273. reconcile..... (Sth)with(sth)
    274. recover(v).....from
    275. recovery(n)...from
    276. refer............... To
    277. reference........ To
    278. rejoice..... At/over
    279. related............ To
    280. rely...................on
    281. remind..............of
    282. remorse......... For
    283. request............for
    284. resemblance... To
    285. resolve.............on
    286. responsible.....for (sth)
    287. restricted........ To
    288. rid....................of
    289. rob....................of
    290. resign......... From
    291. search............ For
    292. seek..............for
    293. senior/junior.......To
    294. sensitive...... To/about
    295. sequel...............to
    296. short.................of
    297. similar............ To
    298. smile/sneer/giggle...At
    299. sorry.........about/for
    300. spend.............on
    301. stick...... To (to continue doing sth despite difficulties)
    302. subject........... To
    303. submission.......to
    304. suffuse..........with
    305. succeed............ In
    306. succession........in
    307. succumb...........to
    308. suffer............from
    309. superior/inferior......to
    310. supplement..... To
    311. supply....... (Sth)to (sb)
    312. supply.......(sb)with(sth )
    313. surprised/shocked....At
    314. suspect.......(sb/sth)of(sth)
    315. suspicious...... Of
    316. sympathize...with(sb/sth)
    317. thankful ...for(sth)
    318. thankful..... To(sb)
    319. thirst/hunger/desire.........For
    320. threaten......(sb)with(sth)
    321. tired............... Of
    322. stick.............. Of
    323. tremble...... With
    324. true..................to
    325. used.................to
    326. victory...... Over/against.
    327. venue............. For
    328. wait.................for
    329. want.................of
    330. waste.......on(sth)
    331. withdraw......from
    332. wonder...... About (think about)
    333. wonder......... At(be surprised)
    334. worthy............. Of
    335. write...... (Sth)to(sb)
    336. write..... In(ink/pencil)
    337. write........ With(a pen)
    338. yearn..............for
    339. yearning........ For
    340. yield............. On
    341. yield..............to
    342. thrive.............. On
    343. self-sufficient....in
    344. debate....... on/with/for.

    Sample of ASEI Lesson Plan

    Mathematics ASEI Lesson Plan

    Subject: Mathematics

    Theme: Algebraic processes

    Topic: Algebra

    Sub Topic: Removing brackets involving one variable

    Date: xx/xx/xxxx

    Class: Basic 6

    Duration: 35 Minutes

    No of Learners: 30

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
    1. Remove the brackets of algebraic expressions involving one variable/ like-term.

      • Removing Bracket from Algebraic Expression

    2. Simplify the algebraic expression.

      • Simplifying Algebraic Expression


    Rationale:

    In our daily life, we encounter situations where we buy the same type of items from different shops and put them together. Also,we come across expressions involving quantities such as 2 chairs, 5 tables, etc. Algebra is that branch of mathematics that uses letters in place of numbers.

    Prerequisite/ Previous knowledge:

    Pupils have learnt about
    1. Addition, Subtraction and multiplication of variables.
    2. Like and unlike terms
    3. Understanding the definition of a variable - understanding what is meant by bracket

    Learning Materials:

    Bananas, Apples, Mangoes, straws, bottle covers

    Reference Materials:

    National Mathematics Centre Teaching Module for Primary School Six.



    Lesson Development:

    STAGE
    TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNING POINTS
    INTRODUCTION
    full class session (5 mins)
    Recap of previous lesson
    E.g. Simplify the following:
    1. 18a-9a+2a-5a
    2. 15y-10y-2y+6y
    Pupils respond to the teacher's question.
    1. (18 + 9 + 2 - 5)a = 24a
    2. (15 - 10 - 2 + 6)y = 9y
    Addition and subtraction of like terms.
    STEP 1
    2 mins.
    The teacher gives the pupils instructions by asking them to arrange themselves into groups. Pupils respond to teachers instructions by grouping themselves and choose their leaders and secretary. Developing leadership skills.
    STEP 2
    DEVELOPMENT
    5 mins.
    Activity 1
    Whole Class
    Find out from pupils in each group how many of them like these particular types of fruits; mangoes(m), apples(a), bananas(b). Teacher captures response for each group and teacher guides pupils to understand practically that, suppose m represents the mangoes, a represents the apples and b represents the bananas.
    1. 2b + 2b + 2b + 2b
      = (2 + 2 + 2 + 2)b
      = 8b
    2. 3m + 4m + 2a
      = (3 + 4)m + 2a
      = 7m + 2a
    3. 5b + 4a + 3a + 2m
      = 5b + (4 + 3)a + 2m
      = 5b + 7a + 2m
    Identifying the learning materials for teaching; Bananas, Apples, Mangoes, straws, bottle covers. Linking real-life situations with algebra The concept of repeated addition.
    STEP 3
    10 mins
    Activity 2 Group Work
    The teacher gives 20 straws to each group.
    Ask 4 members of each group to pick 2 straws.
    4(2s) Removing brackets and simplifying
    Ask them to count the number of straws they picked. Let pupils compare their results 2s + 2s +2s + 2s
    = 8s
    Ask 3 members in each group to pick 2 straws and 3 straws in their left and right hands respectively. 3(2s + 3s)
    Ask pupils to count the number of straws in each group and compare the results 3((2 + 3)s)
    = 3(5)s
    = 15s
    Ask 5 members in each group to pick 4 straws each. 5(4s)
    Ask each of them to take away 2 straws and count the number of straws left 5(4s-2s)
    = 5((4 - 2)s)
    = 5(2)s
    = 10s
    Ask 2 members in each group to pick 5 straws and 3 straws. 2(5s + 3s)
    Ask each of them to take away 4 straws and count the number left. Ask the same pupils to take away 1 straw and count the number of straws left.
    1. 2(5s + 3s - 4s)
      = 2((5 + 3 - 4)s)
      = 2(4)s
      = 8s
    2. 8s - 1s = 7s
    EVALUATION
    7mins
    Simplify the following:
    1. 4(2b)
    2. 2(3x + 4X)
    3. 8(5x - 3x)
    4. 4(4n + 3n + 7n)
    5. 2(3x + 4x)
    6. 15(4e - 3e + 2e + e)
    Pupils responds to teachers questions
    1. 8b
    2. 2(3 + 4)x = 2(7)x
      = 14x
    3. 8(5 - 3)x = 8(2)x
      = 16x
    4. 4(4 + 3 + 7)n = 4(14)n
      = 56n
    5. 2(3 + 4)x = 2(7)x
      = 14x
    6. 15(4 - 3 + 2 + 1)e = 15(4)e
      = 60e
    Asking the learners questions to assess the achievement of the set objectives.
    CONCLUSION
    3mins
    The teacher asks the pupils to simplify the following.
    1. (5y + 4) + (4 – y)
    2. (7x + 4y) – (10x – 8y)
    Let pupils establish that, the operation used to solve the activities was multiplication.
    The pupils respond to the teacher's question.
    1. (5y + 4) + (4 – y)
      = 5y + 4 + 4 – y
      = 5y – y + 4 + 4
      = 4y + 8
      A plus (+) sign before a bracket does not change the sign inside the bracket.
    2. (7x + 4y) – (10x – 8y)
      = 7x + 4y – 10x + 8y
      = 4y + 8y + 7x – 10x
      = 12y – 3x
      A minus (–) sign before a bracket changes the signs inside the bracket.
    Acquiring/ improving understanding of algebraic expressions.
    ASSIGNMENT Give them other problems to solve.
    1. 3k – (5 + 2k)
    2. (3y + 2z) + (y + 3z)
    3. 4a – 3b – 4b + 2a – 3
    4. 5d – (2d + 4)
    5. 4a – 3b – 4b + 2a – 3
    Pupils solve other problems. Improving their level of understanding.

    Lesson Note on Phonics

    Lesson Plan on Phonetics

    Subject: English

    Theme: Phonetics

    Topic: Letter Sounds

    Sub Topic: Sound of Letter /s/, /a/ and /t/

    Date: dd/mm/yyyy

    Class: Basic 2

    Duration: 35 Minutes

    No of Learners: 30

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
    1. Differentiate between giraffe, turtle and monkey tail letters

      e.g
      1. giraffe letters = t, f , h, b, d, k, l
      2. turtle letters = a, c, e, i, m, o, r, s, u, v, w, x, z
      3. monkey tail letters = g, j, p, q, y

    2. Identify the sounds of letters /s/, /a/, /t/ in stories told and perform the action associated with it.

      e.g
      1. /s/ = weave your hand in an 'S' shape and say s, s, s, s, s.
      2. /a/ = wiggle your fingers above the elbow as if ants are crawling on you and say a, a, a, a, a.
      3. /t/ = turn your head from the side, as if you are watching tennis, and say t, t, t, t, t.

    3. Write the sound and use the actions associated with it to spell words. E.g /s/ as, at, ass, sat
    4. Using your magic writing pen and board, blend some sounds to form two and three-letter words.
    5. Sing the songs associated with the letters.

    Rationale:

    Reading is a skill that learners communicate effectively. Any learner that cannot read cannot pass any examination. It is, therefore, necessary for every pupil to be exposed to the sound of letters so that they can read fluently.

    Prerequisite/ Previous knowledge:

    Pupils have learnt how to recite the alphabet from a-z and can identify the vowel sounds.

    Learning Materials:

    Flashcards and charts (alphabet and objects.)

    Reference Materials:

    Jolly phonics pupils book 1 by Sue I Joy and Sara Wernham.


    Lesson Development:

    STAGE
    TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNING POINTS
    INTRODUCTION
    full class session (5mins)
    The teacher asks the pupils to recite the alphabet on the alphabet chart displayed before the class.


    How many vowels do we have? Mention them
    Learners recite the letter a-z on the chart


    Pupils expected response. We have five vowels. E.g.
    a, e, i, o, u.
    Revising the previous lesson and identifying the vowels sounds.
    DEVELOPMENT
    Step 1. Group Work (5mins)
    Guide the pupils to form four groups and ask them to choose their leaders and secretaries.

    Explain to the pupils how to identify giraffe letters, turtle and monkey tail letters.
    Learners form four groups and choose their leaders and secretaries. Inculcating leadership skills, boldness, competitive spirit, teamwork, and a sense of responsibility among pupils.
    Give the four groups the alphabet chart. Guide them to identify the different types of letters and vowel sounds. Let every group read out their answers consecutively. Learners expected response:-
    Giraffe letters: b, d, f, h, k, l, t.
    Turtle letters: a, c, e, i, m, n, o, r, s, u, v, x, z.
    Monkey tail letters: g, j, p, q, y.
    Vowel sounds: a, e, i, o, u.
    Finding out the differences between the giraffe, turtle and monkey tail letters/ Vowels.
    Step 2 Full class session (7mins) Tell the pupils stories and ask them to identify the letter sound that is predominant in the story. Learners identify the sound of the letter that is predominant in the story as /s/, /a/, /t/. Developing the idea of the phonics sound from the stories told.
    Flash the letters and let them make the sound. Demonstrate how to write them in the air, on their friends back, on their desk, with their whole bodies and sand trays with their magic writing pen (their fingers). Pupils demonstrate how to write the letter sounds. Pupils are allowed to ask questions. Demonstrating how to write the letters.
    Step 3 Full class session (8mins). Teachers demonstrate the actions associated with the letter sounds and asks the pupils to do the same.
    Using her magic writing board (left arm) she blends two/three-letter words for pupils to pronounce. e.g.
    /a/, /s/ = as,
    /a/, /t/ = at,
    /a/, /s/, /s/ = ass,
    /s/, /a/, /t/ = sat
    Pupils observe and emulate their teacher's actions. Blending two and three-letter sounds to form words.
    EVALUATION
    Full class session (7mins).
    Ask the following questions to evaluate the achievement of the set objectives.
    Teachers dictate the following words using arm blending and action for the pupils to write into their books. e.g.
    1. /a/ /s/ = as
    2. /a/ /t/ = at
    3. /a/ /s/ /s/ = ass
    4. /s/ /a/ /t/ = sat
    Pupil write down the words dictated into their notebooks. eg:
    /a/ /s/ =as
    /a/ /t/ = at
    /a/ /s/ /s/ = ass
    /s/ /a/ /t/ sat
    Acquiring listing skills and improving their calligraphy and reading skills.
    Conclusion, full class session (3mins) The teacher marks their papers and corrects their mistakes where necessary. teacher clarifies the areas where the pupils were confused and summarizes the lesson. Pupils make corrections where necessary. Learners improve their reading skills.
    ASSIGNMENT
    1. Identify the sounds of /s/, /a/ and /t/ in the following words
      1. bag, cat, tea, rat, bottle, see, six, sun, ask
    Pupils answer other questions. Learners improve their reading skills.

    ASEI Lesson Plan on Biology

    Lesson Note on Transport in Plants

    Subject: Biology

    Theme: Transport in Plants

    Topic: Transport in Plant II

    Sub Topic: Internal Structure of a Dicotyledonous Stem

    Date: xx/xx/xxxx

    Class: S.S.S 2

    Duration: 35 Minutes

    No of Learners: 30

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
    1. Identify and draw the internal tissues of dicotyledonous stem under a light microscope.

      • Dicot Stem


    2. Identify the plant tissue that is involved in the transportation of water and mineral salts in dicotyledonous stem using a light microscope.

    3. The part that transports water and mineral salts are;

      • Vascular bundle
    4. Compare the internal structure of a stem of monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants

    5. Vascular bundles in dicotyledonous plants are arranged like a ring while those in monocotyledonous are scattered

    Rationale:

    The stem is a plant organ whose primary functions are to support the shoot, conduct water and mineral salts from the roots to the leaves and transfer manufactured food from the leaves to the other parts of the plants. Various tissues in the stem carry out these functions. Knowledge of this will make learners appreciate that the internal structures of monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous stems differ in a relation to the arrangement of their tissues.

    Prerequisite/ Previous knowledge:

    • Use of a light microscope
    • Cell specialisation (Cells, tissues, organs)
    • Preparation of temporary slides
    • The internal structure of the monocotyledonous stem.

    Learning Materials:

    Light microscopes, scalpels, slides and cover slips, young dicotyledonous plant e.g. Bidens pilosa L. (Asteraceae) 'the black jack' and monocotyledonous plant, Petri dishes, water, eosin solution and a chart of the internal structures of stems, photomicrograph of a dicotyledonous stem, white tiles

    Reference Materials:

    Biology A New Approach For Senior Secondary Schools and Colleges By E. O. Egho,
    Modern Biology for SSS By Kucy I. Aunwa et-al



    Lesson Development:

    STAGE
    TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNING POINTS
    INTRODUCTION
    full class session (5mins)
    The teacher provides Learners with 2 plants in flasks labelled A and B dipped in eosin dye, and ask learners:
    1. to identify the two major groups the plants' A and B belong to.
    2. List down the external observation that helped you to classify the two plants.
    3. Looking at the chart showing the internal structure of the monocotyledonous stem, predict which of the labelled parts would be stained red with the dye. Give your explanation for the answer you have given.
      • Mono Stem


      The teacher draws a table and list down the differences.

    Learners observe the two plants and identify the groups the plant belongs to.

    1. Plant A: monocotyledonous plant,
    2. Plant B: dicotyledonous plant.
    Learners account for their classification by listing down the differences between the two plants (Minds-on activity).
    The external differences between them are:
    1. Monocotyledonous plants have parallel venation while dicotyledonous have network venation.
    2. Monocotyledonous plants have narrow leaves while dicotyledonous have broad leaves.
    3. Monocotyledonous plants have fibrous roots while dicotyledonous plants have a tap root system.

    Observation and identification of plants
    The teacher asks learners the following questions;
    1. Which of the part labelled would have stained red with the dye? And why?
    2. What is the part that transports water and mineral salts
    3. Identify the two types of tissues in V/bundle

    Learners observe the two plants and notice what has happened to the red dye.

    Learners look at the chart of a plan diagram of the internal structure of the monocotyledonous stem.

    1. The red dye has moved through the root, stem to the leaves.
    2. The vascular bundle is the part that transports water and mineral salts.
    3. the two types of tissues in V/bundle are Xylem and phloem.

    Development
    (20 minutes)
    Activity 2 (Sectioning):

    The teacher provides material, apparatus and students worksheets.
    The teacher gives brief instruction and necessary CAUTION.

    Teacher guide learners to perform the following activity;

    1. Cut a slit in a potato tuber.
    2. Insert a piece of the stem of the dicotyledonous plant between the potatoes slit, for firm holding of the stem.
    3. Cut suitable thin transverse sections through a dicotyledonous stem.
    4. Keep the sections in water in a Petri dish.
    5. Select the thinnest section from the Petri dish, mount on the slide, and place a coverslip.
    6. Examine the section under the microscope (low power objective, then medium power objective).
    7. Draw a large labelled plan diagram of the section.


    Teachers supervise and guides students.

    The learners form working groups.


    The learners cut and mount transverse sections of the stem (Hand-on activity).

    Learners observe sections under the light microscope.

    CAUTION: about handling sharp cutting instruments (scalpel).
    Sectioning and manipulation of the microscope.

    For the vascular bundle of the stem to be seen learners must cut the transverse section.

    The specimen should be very thin to pass through light.

    (Drawing and labelling)
    Learners draw a plan diagram of what they observe and they label the diagram as they discuss (Minds-on activity).
    Learners answer the following questions.
    1. - In which tissue are the cells coloured red?
    2. How do you explain this?
    Recording observation by drawing
    • Decot Stem


    Reasoning and clarification
    1. Xylem is the part that is coloured red.
    2. Dye dissolved in water and moved through the stem.
    EVALUATIONbr (10 minutes) The teacher evaluates the lesson by posing questions;
    1. generalize the internal structure of a stem of a dicotyledonous plant using a chart.
    2. compare the monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous internal structures of the stem.
    1. Major plant tissues to be identified include vascular tissue (xylem and phloem), cortex, cambium and epidermis).
    2. Organising the concepts through comparison and contrast
      Vascular bundles in dicotyledonous plants are arranged like a ring while those in monocotyledonous are scattered
    Asking the learners questions to assess the achievement of the set objectives.
    CONCLUSION
    5mins
    The teacher consolidates the main points and corrects any misconceptions. Learners consolidate the key areas of drawing and labelling plan diagrams. The main points are no shading, continuous lines, use of sharp pencil and to draw what is observed.
    ASSIGNMENT
    1. Give a comparison between the internal structure of a monocotyledonous and a dicotyledonous stem.
    2. Give a reason why each of the following steps is followed:
      1. Cutting very thin sections
      2. Using a sharp razor blade during the cutting
      3. Placing the sections in water
      4. Staining the sections before observing under the microscope
    Learners answer other questions Improving their level of understanding

    ASEI Lesson Plan Format

    Lesson Note on Chemistry

    Subject: Chemistry

    Theme: Acids Bases & Indicators

    Topic: Acids Bases & Indicators II

    Sub Topic: Reactivity Series of Metals using Dilute HCl

    Date: dd/mm/yyyy

    Class: S.S.S 2

    Duration: 35 Minutes

    No of Learners: 30

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
    1. Arrange the metals A, B, and C in order of their reactivity after reacting with dilute HCl

    2. Metal A reaction with dilute acids was rapid, bubbles and hissing sounds are produced, the test tube becomes warm and a colourless solution was formed. Metal A is probably Magnesium.

      Mg(s) + 2HCl(aq) → MgCl2(aq) + H2(g)↑

      Metal B reaction with dilute acids was more rapid than metal A, bubbles are produced, the test tube was hot/warm than that of metal A and a colourless solution was form. Metal B is probably Calcium.

      Ca(s) + 2HCl(aq) → CaCl2(aq) + H2(g)↑

      Metal C reaction with dilute acids was much less vigorous i.e very slow, with much smaller bubbles produced and pale green solutions formed when reaction went to completion, a yellow showery sparks and black solid were produced when the heat was applied. Metal C is probably Iron.

      Fe(s) + 2HCl(aq) → FeCl2(aq) + H2(g)↑

      Reactivity of Metals A, B, and C with dilute HCL is

      MOST REACTIVE Metal B → LESS REACTIVE Metal A → LEAST REACTIVE Metal C

    3. Define a reactivity series.

    4. The reactivity series of metals is a chart showing metals in order of decreasing reactivity. In general, the more reactive a metal is:

      • the more vigorous its reactions are
      • the more easily it loses electrons in reactions to form positive ions (cations)

    Rationale:

    Reactions of metals and acids are very important in everyday life. The speed of a reaction is crucial, for example, in industrial processes where a product ought to be obtained as fast and as cheaply as possible for economic reasons. Do reactions take place at the same speed? This activity will help learners to answer this question.

    Prerequisite/ Previous knowledge:

    Acids, metals and reactions of dilute acids with metals and the products, writing and balancing chemical reaction.

    Learning Materials:

    Four Test tubes per group, dilute hydrochloric acid, rubber bands, balloons, metal powder labelled as A, B and C, Magnesium ribbon

    Reference Materials:

    New School Chemistry. By Ababio



    Lesson Development:

    STAGE
    TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNING POINTS
    INTRODUCTION
    full class session (5mins)
    The teacher asks the learners to write and balance the following reaction:
    1. Mg(s) + H2SO4(aq)
    2. Ca(s) + H2SO4(aq)
    3. Ca(s) + HCl(aq)
    4. Mg(s) + HCl(aq)
    5. Na(s) + H2O(l)
    6. CaCO3(s) + HCl(aq)
    7. Ca(OH)2(s) + HCl(aq)
    8. Fe(s) + HCl(aq)
    The learners attempted the teacher's questions:
    1. Mg(s) + H2SO4(aq) → MgSO4(aq) + H2(g)
    2. Ca(s) + H2SO4(aq) → CaSO4(s) + H2(g)
    3. Ca(s) + 2HCl(aq) → CaCl2(aq) + H2(g)
    4. Mg(s) + 2HCl(aq) → MgCl2(aq) + H2(g)
    5. 2Na(s) + 2H2O(l) → 2NaOH(aq) + H2(g)
    6. CaCO3(s) + 2HCl(aq) → CaCl2(aq) + CO2(g) + H2O(l)
    7. Ca(OH)2(s) + 2HCl(aq) → CaCl2(aq)+ 2H2O(l)
    8. Fe(s) + 2HCl(aq) → FeCl2(aq) + H2 (g)
    Linking previous knowledge with the lesson
    STEP 1
    10 mins.
    Development
    The teacher writes on the whiteboard the topic and sub-topics.

    Activity 1

    Teacher shown learners the metal X and asked learners to identify its name.
    The learners identify its name.
    Magnesium ribbon
    Pre-requisite knowledge
    The teacher reacted the Metal X with acid and ask learners to state the observations. Learners observe the reaction of the metal with the acid and state the observations. (Hands and Minds-on activity)
    Learners identify the products formed.
    Learners suggest whether different metals react rapidly with acids. (Minds-on activity)
    Observation of the reaction
    • Bubbles and hissing sounds are produced, test tube becomes warm.
    • Metals react with acid to produce Salt and Hydrogen gas.

    Predictions

    STEP 2
    10 mins.

    Activity 2

    Teacher explains the purpose of the activity as to investigate how fast metals A, B, and C react with dilute HCl.
    The teacher explains the procedure and precautions to be taken care of by the learners.

    Material/apparatus

    • Three test tubes
    • 10 ml measuring cylinder,
    • Dilute hydrochloric acid,
    • Balloons,
    • Rubber bands,
    • Metal powder labelled A, B and C,
    • Stop Watch

    PROCEDURE:

    1. You are provided with three test tubes labelled A, B and C respectively. Using a 10 ml measuring cylinder provided, measure 8 cm3 of dilute hydrochloric acid and add into test tubes A, B and C.
    2. Put a spatula end full of metal powder labelled A, B and C into Balloons A, B and C respectively as shown below.
      • Reaction of metals with HCl


    3. Tie the mouth of each balloon to the mouth of a test tube using a rubber band and ensure that acid and the metal do not mix at this stage.

      • Reaction of metals with HCl


      Precaution: Make sure no acid spills on your skin or clothes.
    4. Simultaneously, lift the bottoms of the balloons so that the metals flow down into the test tube and react with the acid.
    5. Observe the test tubes and balloons for 5 minutes.

    Learners go through the instructions written in the paper to familiarise themselves with the activities and collect apparatus/chemicals and do the experiment. (Hands-on activity).

    Learners discuss and record the observations in their exercise books. (Minds-on activity)


    Cautions: Handling of the acid.

    Preparation of the experiments


    Meniscus of measuring cylinder

    STEP 3
    (5 mins)
    The teacher goes around to check on what learners are doing and assist where necessary. Learners arrange the metal A, B and C in the order of the speed of reaction.
    Learners report on their observations and the order of the metals on the chalkboard.
    Observation and group discussions

    1. Test tube B produced more bubbles and hissing sounds and became warm.
    2. Balloon B inflated most followed by A.
    3. Recording the observations
    4. The most reactive metal is B while the least is C.

    STEP 4
    5 mins
    The teacher asks learners to identify Metals A, B, and C base on their observations. Learners identify Metals A, B, and C:

    Metal A reaction with dilute acids was rapid, bubbles and hissing sounds are produced, the test tube becomes warm and a colourless solution was formed. Metal A is probably Magnesium.


    Metal B reaction with dilute acids was more rapid than metal A, bubbles are produced, the test tube was hot/warm than that of metal A and a colourless solution was formed. Metal B is probably Calcium.


    Metal C reaction with dilute acids was much less vigorous i.e very slow, with much smaller bubbles produced and pale green solutions formed when reaction went to completion, a yellow showery sparks and black solid were produced when the heat was applied. Metal C is probably Iron.

    Interpretation of the observation on the reactions
    EVALUATION
    3mins
    The teacher asks questions to the learners to evaluate the lesson.
    1. The reaction of metal with acid.
    2. Definition of Reactivity series
    3. Which metal will produce a large amount of hydrogen gas and give a reason.
    1. When a metal reacts with dilute acid, salt and hydrogen are formed.
    2. Metals react at different easiness with acids.
    3. Reactivity series: list of metals/elements in order of their reactivity
    4. Metal B test tube where most bubbles are seen and the largest expansion of balloon indicates that the largest volume of Hydrogen gas was produced and the fastest reaction took place.
    Asking the learners questions to assess the achievement of the set objectives.
    CONCLUSION
    2mins
    The teacher guides the learners so that they come up with the concepts from the observations drawn. (Bridging the activities to the concept). Metal B reacts faster than metal A and C in a given time. Application: expansion of the concept
    ASSIGNMENT
    1. What did you observe to show that a gas was produced?
    2. Name and explain how that gas is tested in a chemistry laboratory
    3. Write a word equation on the reaction between the dilute hydrochloric acid and Zinc metal
    Learners answer other questions. Improving their level of understanding on Reactivity Series of Metals using dilute HCl.

    Teaching Methods and Strategies

    Lesson Plan Sample

    Subject: Physics

    Theme: Fluid

    Topic: Fluid Flow

    Sub Topic: Bernoulli's Effect

    Date: xx/xx/xxxx

    Class: S.S.S 1

    Duration: 35 Minutes

    No of Learners: 30

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
    1. Perform and describe experiments to illustrate Bernoulli’s effect

    2. ACTIVITY 1

      This involves taking a sheet of A4 paper, holding it at one end by the corners and placing it level with your mouth. If you blow over the top surface of the paper it should rise. This happens because the moving air which is travelling across the top of the paper is of lower pressure than the air beneath. It shows how aircraft wings work by gaining 'lift' from the difference in pressure above and below the wing.

      • Experiment with A4

      Hold one edge of the paper just below your mouth and blow. It should look something like this. As you blow over the paper, the air on the top is moving faster than the air on the bottom. According to Bernoulli's principle, this faster-moving air on the top has a lower pressure than the non-moving air on the bottom. With greater pressure on the bottom of the paper, there is also a greater force pushing up. The paper then starts to move up. When the paper gets too high, it gets into the air stream which pushes it back down.

      • Experiment with A4

      ACTIVITY 2

      Fold the paper in half to make a paper tent. Place the paper tent on a flat surface such as a table or a desk. Position the straw about 2 inches away from the paper tent so that you will be able to blow a steady stream of air across the surface of the table or desk and under the tent. Observe what happens. Now, blow harder and observe.

      • Experiment with A4

      ACTIVITY 3

      Fill a clear plastic cup, nearly to the rim, with water. Cut the drinking straw in half. Place one half of the straw in the water so that the bottom of the straw does not touch the bottom of the cup. The top of the straw should be sticking out above the rim of the cup. Position the second half of the straw so that it is perpendicular to, but not touching the straw in the cup of water. You should be able to blow a stream of air over the hole of the straw sticking out of the water. Once the straw is in position, blow very hard through the straw. Observe and record what happens.

      • Experiment with Straw

      ACTIVITY 4

      Place the ball in the funnel. Tilt your head back and point the wider end of the funnel upwards toward the ceiling or sky. Note: For health reasons only one student should blow into the funnel. Blow air forcefully through the narrow end of the funnel in an attempt to lift the ball out of the funnel. Observe and record what happens. Now, with the ball in the funnel as before, hold the funnel in front of you and blow forcefully across the top of the wider end of the funnel.

      • Experiment with funnel

      Science project Bernoulli's Principle Experiment
    3. Explain Bernoulli’s effect.

    4. As the speed of the air increases, its pressure decreases. Even when air is just sitting around, it still has pressure. That’s called static pressure, and it’s due to the weight of the air pressing down.


    Rationale:

    Motion of fluids is an important phenomenon and the study of fluid dynamics has enabled scientists to advance in many areas of technology. The taking off of aeroplanes and helicopters, the designing of high-speed vehicles, ships and submarines are some of the applications based on the knowledge of fluid flow. When vehicles move at high speed they tend to pull objects towards them, this can also be explained by the same concept. This lesson will enable learners to understand the principle behind the designing and operation of some of these devices.

    Prerequisite/ Previous knowledge:

    Definition of speed and fluid.
    Existence of atmospheric pressure,

    Learning Materials:

    Foolscaps/plane sheets of paper, 2 ball pen casings, water in a beaker, spray gun

    Reference Materials:

    Senior Secondary Physics. By P. N. Okeke and M. W. Anyakoha


    Lesson Development:

    STAGE
    TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNING POINTS
    INTRODUCTION
    full class session (5mins)
    The teacher asks the learners definition of fluid. The learners define fluid and give examples of fluids. (Minds-on activity).
    A substance that flows — usually a LIQUID or a GAS.
    Linking previous knowledge with the lesson
    STEP 1
    10 mins.
    Development

    Activity 1

    Teacher poses a question on activity 1.
    Hold a piece of paper in front of your mouth and blow air over it.
    1. What do you observe?
    2. What happens?
    The learners hold a piece of paper in front of the mouth and blow over it. (Hand-on activity).
    Learners explain the reason the paper rises.
    Predictions (exploration)
    The paper rises on blowing above it.
    Confirmation of their predictions from the activities’ results.
    Pressure above the paper reduces.
    STEP 2
    10 mins.

    Activity 2

    Teacher poses a second question on activity 2.
    Fold the paper in half to make a paper tent. Place the paper tent on a flat surface such as a table or a desk and blow air between them.
    1. What do you observe?
    2. Explain your observations?

    Learners predict. (Minds-on activity).
    Learners fold the pieces of paper half to make a paper tent and blow air between them. (Hands-on activity).
    Learners confirm their predictions and explain their observations. (Bridging the activity to the concept: inductive bridge).
    Learners concretise the concept with help of a diagram on the chalkboard.
    Learners explain the concept using scientific terms.


    Predictions (exploration)

    Predictions (exploration)


    Identification of the relationship between pressure and speed of air


    Increase in the speed of air causes the pressure to reduce.

    STEP 3
    Group Work (5 mins)
    Guide the Students to form four groups and ask them to choose their leaders and secretaries. Learners form four groups and choose their leaders and secretaries. Inculcating leadership skills, boldness, competitive spirit, teamwork, and a sense of responsibility among students.
    STEP 4
    5 mins

    Activity 3

    Teacher poses the third question on activity 3.
    Place two ballpoint casings perpendicular to one another with the erect one dipped in the water contained in a beaker (see diagram shown below). Blow air through the horizontal ballpoint case. (The blowing should be hard).
    1. What do you observe?
    2. Explain your observation.
    Learners go into groups to do activity 3.
    Learners blow hard through the horizontal narrow tube which is held perpendicularly to a vertical tube inserted in water. (Hands-on activity).
    Learners expand their ideas on the concept through group discussion. (Minds-on activity).
    Learners record and explain their observations in a group worksheet.
    Learners report and explain their observations to the other learners on the chalkboard.
    Learners harmonize their ideas guided by the teacher. (Bridging the activity to the concept: deductive bridge).
    The water jets out in a spray.
    Application of the relationship between speed of air and pressure.
    Recording the observations
    Interpretation of the observation on the phenomenon
    EVALUATION
    3mins
    The teacher evaluates the lesson by pausing a question to the learners on activities.
    • Experiment with can

    Place the two soda cans parallel to one another and 3/4 of an inch apart on a flat surface such as a table or desk.
    Use a straw to blow between the two cans about one-one over four(1 1/4)-inches above the surface of the table or desk. Be sure that the open end of the straw is placed in front of the cans and not between them and observe and record what happens. Also, blow on it directly and observe and record what happens.

    1. When you blow on a can, it moves. When you blow air between the two cans, they move together.
    2. When you blow at a can directly, the can move due to the invisible push of the wind. When a force like the wind pushes on a specific area, it's called pressure. It’s as if you moved the can with the pressure of your hand.
    3. When air is moving, it has velocity pressure. Bernoulli’s principle says that the pressure of a fluid when it’s moving is lower than when it’s static or resting. When the air is no longer still, the pressure on its edges decreases. When the pressure around the cans decreases, they move into the centre.
    Asking the learners questions to assess the achievement of the set objectives.
    CONCLUSION
    2mins
    The teacher wraps up from the learners' observations. Learners revise the three activities and relate them to the concept.
    Learners identify the applications of Bernoulli’s Effect in their daily life experiences.
    Application of Bernoulli’s Effect (spray guns, Pulling effect due to a big lorry passing by)
    ASSIGNMENT The diagram below shows a spray gun. Explain how it works.
    • Spray gun


    Learners answer other questions. Improving their level of understanding of Bernoulli’s Effect.

    Lesson Plan Sample

    Lesson Note on Arithmatic Sequences

    Subject: Mathematics

    Theme: Sequences and Series

    Topic: Sequences and Series II

    Sub Topic: Arithmatic Sequences

    Date: dd/mm/yyyy

    Class: Basic 6

    Duration: 35 Minutes

    No of Learners: 30

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
    1. Derive the general formula of a particular arithmetic sequence (progression) A.P

    2. Example of sequence;

      • 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, ....
      • 5, 10, 20, 40, 80, ....
      • -3, -1, 1, 3, 5, ...

      In an Arithmetic Progression, A.P, it is conventional to denote the:

      • Term = T
      • first term = a or T1
      • constant difference b/w any two consecutive terms = d
      • nth term = Tn

      From the example of the sequence above; 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,...


      T1 = 1 = a
      T2 = 2 = a + d => a + (2 - 1)d
      T3 = 3 = a + d + d => a + 2d => a + (3 - 1)d
      T4 = 4 = a + d + d + d => a + 3d => a + (4 - 1)d
      T5 = 5 = a + d + d + d + d => a + 4d => a + (5 - 1)d
      Following this pattern,
      T6 = a + (6 - 1)d and
      T7 = a + (7 - 1)d and so on.
      Therefore, nth term Tn = a + (n - 1)d
    3. Apply the general formula to solve problems.

      • Find the 9th term of the sequence 6, 11, 16, 21, 26, ...
      • The 10th term of an A.P is 47, the 4th term is 17. Write down the first 3 terms of the sequence.
      SOLUTION
      1. T1 => a = 6
        d = T2 - T1 or T3 - T2 or T4 - T3 ...
        d = 11 - 6 = 5
        T9 = ?
        Since Tn = a + (n - 1)d
        :. T9 = 6 + (9 -1)5
        T9 = 6 + 40
        T9 = 46
      2. T10 = a + (10 - 1)d => a + 9d = 47
        T4 = a + (4 - 1)d => a + 3d = 17
        These are now two simultaneous equations
        a + 9d = 47 -----------(i)
        a + 3d = 17 -----------(ii)
        By eliminating, 6d = 30:. d = 5
        From (ii) a + 3d = 17; substituting for d in (ii):. d = 5
        :. The first term of the sequence T1 = 2
        The second term of the sequence T2 = a + (2 - 1)d
        T2 = 2 + (1)5 => 2 + 5 => 7
        The third term of the sequence T3 = a + (3 - 1)d
        T3 = 2 + (2)5 => 2 + 10 => 12
        :. The first three terms of the sequence are 2, 7, 12

    Rationale:

    Mathematical skills to explore number patterns are applied to our daily life such as in the design of clothes and ornaments. Also, the idea of the sequence is applied to our daily life such as in calculating simple and compound interest, and accumulated amounts in banks.

    Prerequisite/ Previous knowledge:

    • Defining a sequence and an arithmetic sequence
    • Skills of generalisation and prediction
    • Simple number patterns

    Learning Materials:

    Matchsticks, worksheet on manila paper

    Reference Materials:

    1. Cambridge University Press, 1994, ‘School Mathematics of East Africa Book 1’, Cambridge University Press, second edition,
    2. General Mathematics for Senior Secondary 2.


    Lesson Development:

    STAGE
    TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNING POINTS
    INTRODUCTION
    full class session (5mins)
    The teacher writes the following sequences on a whiteboard and the learners write them down in their notebooks.
    4, 7, 10, 13, 16, ...
    3, 8, 13, 18, ...
      Teacher ask learners;
    • to explain their observation in the set of numbers above?
    • to say what an arithmetic sequence is?
    • to explain how to get the 20th term of the first arithmetic sequence.
    Learners respond to teacher questions
    • The set of numbers are arranged consecutively (orderly manner), ie following one another and every member of the set is obtained from the previous member by a certain rule. When numbers appear or are presented one after the other in an orderly manner, we refer to the set of numbers as a sequence.
    • An arithmetic sequence is a form of sequence in which each term is gotten by the addition of a common difference to the preceding one, ie Arithmetic sequences are a sequence that follows a simple addition rule.
    • ..., 16+3, 19+3, 22+3, 25+3, 28+3, 31+3,...
    Learner’s entry points.
    Confirming the previous knowledge.
    STEP 1
    12 mins.
    Development
    • The teacher asks learners to form groups.
    • The teacher explains to the learners the activity and demonstrates how to make the first three patterns with matchsticks.
    • The learners go into groups.
    • Being able to identify the apparatus.
    • The learners make the next three patterns. (Hands-on activity)
    • The learners note the number of matchsticks against the number of squares made.
      • Activity of sequence using matche stickes

    Identification of the patterns

    ACTIVITY

    Learners carry out the following activities presented in printed paper, manila sheets or simply written on a whiteboard by a teacher.

    The learners complete the table and identify the pattern of getting the number of matchsticks used to make the squares (Minds-on activity).
    Learners count the number of matchsticks required in the cases of four, five and six squares. Then, complete the following table.
    No. of squares formed No. of matchsticks used The way of calculating no. of matchsticks used The way of calculating no. of matchsticks used
    1 4 4 4
    2 7 4 + 3 4 + d
    3 10 4 + 3 + 3 4 + 2d
    4
    5
    6
     
     
     
     
    STEP 2
    10 mins.
    The teacher asks learners to find the number of matchsticks needed to form:
    • 30 squares
    • 100 squares
    • n squares
    Through group discussion, the learners get the number of matchsticks used to make 30 and 100 squares, using the patterns in the table. (Minds-on activity: bridging between activity and concept) The number of times the common difference occurs is (n–1) in the nth term.
    The learners derive the general form of getting the nth term of this particular arithmetic sequence. (Minds-on activity: bridging between activity and concept).
    The learners report and explain their results to the other learners on a whiteboard.
    Induction of a general form: Tn = 4 + (n – 1)d where d = 3
    STEP 3
    Group Work (8 mins)
    The teacher asks the learners to get the 20th term of the arithmetic sequence given at the beginning of the lesson and review the predictions made earlier. 4, 7, 10, 13, 16, ...
    The learners explain how to get the 20th term.
    a = 4
    d = 7 - 4 = 3
    T20 = ?
    Tn = a + (n - 1)d
    T20 = 4 + (20 - 1)3
    T20 = 4 + (19)3
    T20 = 4 + 57
    T20 = 61
    Application of the general form: substituting a number
    EVALUATION
    5 mins
    The teacher asks the students questions.
    1. Derive the general formula of an AP.
    2. Find the number of terms in the Arithmetic Progression (A.P)
      2, -9, -20, ..., -141
    3. The 12th term of an AP is -41. If the first term is 3, find the 20th term.
    Learners attempted teacher's questions.
    1. T1 = a
      T2 = a + d
      T3 = a + 2d
      T4 = a + 3d
      T5 = a + 4d
      :. Tn = a + (n - 1)d
    2. a = 2
      d = -9 - 2 => -11
      Tn = -141
      n =?
      Applying Tn = a + (n - 1)d
      -141 = 2 + (n - 1)-11
      -141 = 2 + (-11n + 11)
      -141 = 2 - 11n + 11
      11n = 141 + 2 + 11
      11n = 154
      n = 154/11
      n = 14
    3. n = 12
      T12 = 41
      a = 3
      d =?
      T20 =?
      Applying Tn = a + (n - 1)d
      T12 => -41 = 3 + (12 - 1)d
      -41 = 3 + 11d
      -41 - 3 = 11d
      -44 = 11d d = -44/11 Thus d = -4

      :. T20 = 3 + (20 - 1)-4
      T20 = 3 + (19)-4
      T20 = 3 - 76
      T20 = -73
    Asking the learners questions to assess the achievement of the set objectives.
    CONCLUSION
    2 mins
    Teachers wrap up from the learners' observations. The learners derive the general form for getting the nth term of the other arithmetic sequence given at the beginning of the lesson. Taking the initial term as three and common difference as five.
    ASSIGNMENT Triangles are made following the pattern below.
    Draw the next two patterns for getting the number of matchsticks to make 4 and 5 triangles.

    1. The first term of AP is 8. If the tenth term is double the second term, the common difference is?
    2. The 2nd, 3rd, and 4th terms of an AP are x-2, 5, and x+2 respectively, Calculate the value of x.
    3. If 8, x, y, z, 32 is an AP, find the value of x, y, and z
    Learners solve other problems. Improving their level of understanding of AP.

    ASEI PDSI Lesson Plan

    Lesson Note on Essay Writing

    Subject: English Language

    Theme: Essay Writing

    Topic: Argumentative Writing

    Sub Topic: Infusing Narrative & Reflective Elements in Argumentative Writing

    Date: dd/mm/yyyy

    Class: S.S.S 3

    Duration: 35 Minutes

    No of Learners: 30

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
    1. Infuse personal voice in their writing to improve the persuasiveness of their writing and self-expression.

    Rationale:

    A shift towards expository rather than narrative writing has been observed in the new GCE ‘O’ Level English Language examination syllabus. Therefore, there is a need to teach our students the necessary skills and strategies for them to express their opinions and arguments effectively. Most of our students show a positive attitude and interest towards argumentative writing but their essays are often flat, disengaged pieces of writing where arguments are simply stated and seldom argued. Thus this lesson will help students infuse their voice in their writing so that their essays would be more authentic and persuasive.

    Target Skills:

    • Expository
    • Writing
    • Argumentative

    Prerequisite/ Previous knowledge:

    Students have heard of the acronym PEEL for essays and have written one for a while.

    E.g. Should infants be given iPads?

    • POINT: Infants should not be given iPads, because studies show children under two can face developmental delays if they are exposed to too much screen time.
    • EVIDENCE/EXAMPLE: A recent paediatric study showed that infants who are exposed to too much screen time may experience delays in speech development.
    • EXPLANATION: The reason infants are facing these delays is that screen time is replacing other key developmental activities.
    • LINK: The evidence suggests that infants who have a lot of screen time experience negative consequences in their speech development, and therefore they should not be exposed to iPads at such a young age.


    Learning Materials:

    PEEL Template, Journal.

    Reference Materials:

    New Oxford Secondary English Course SSS 3 By Ayo Banjo et al.
    New Concept English for Senior Secondary School 3 (Revised Edition) by F. Ademola-Adeoye & others.

    Lesson Development:

    STAGE
    TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNING POINTS
    INTRODUCTION: Pre-lesson (conducted before study lesson)
    full class session (5 mins).
    Lead-in activity.

    The Teacher asks students about their views regarding school uniforms, why school uniforms are necessary.
    Teacher to encourage vibrant brainstorm of ideas and facilitate students’ participation.

    Students may give responses like “identify students from a school”, “make sure everyone is the same”.

    Learner’s entry points.

    Students can apply the structure of PEEL correctly when planning their paragraphs.

    The teacher gives the class a prompt (It is said that school uniform gives pupils a sense of identity and encourages good discipline. Do you agree?) and gets students to discuss their views with their peers'.
    Teacher to ensure that students engage in active discussion or debate with their peers and arrive at their own opinion.

    Students who agree may say their uniforms are unique and so help identify others of the school they are from, or that they will be more mindful of their behaviour when in uniform. Students who disagree may say that they don’t like the uniform and so don't like to be associated with the school.

    Students are enthusiastic to speak up and give suggestions

    The teacher goes through a recap of the 5 paragraph structure for expository writing and PEEL format for paragraphs.
    Teacher to give further examples of P, E, E, L for students to reinforce what PEEL is about.

    Students recall what they understand by the PEEL structure: The main point, elaborate, evidence and link.

    In groups of 4, students construct 2 PEEL paragraphs (one on the sense of identity and one on good discipline) and submit them to the teacher.
    Teacher to explain that the P is one of the reasons for them agreeing or disagreeing that school uniforms inculcates discipline and instils belonging.

    Students may not be clear about what PEEL when attempting to write about school uniforms. They may put P as the question about school uniforms.

    Students form their own opinion on whether they agree or disagree with the topic

    STEP 1 STUDY LESSON
    30 mins.
    Development and Grouping

    (Before the start of the lesson, The Teacher choose one group's body paragraph - preferably one of the better ones and put it up on word document/ powerpoint slides)
    Teacher to give affirmation and compliment students for their good effort.

    Students should feel that teacher is giving them relevant feedback. They might be curious about the owner of the work.

    The Teacher show class the student group's paragraph on the sense of identity and ask them to critique / comment.
    Teacher to validate the ride on students' opinions while teaching the strategies for writing a good body paragraph.

    Students express their opinion on whether they like the paragraph or not and the reason why.

    The Teacher then shows how this paragraph can be improved. For each student's sentence, The Teacher demonstrates how it can be rewritten for improvement. (teach students to avoid repeating question-wording, use pronoun 'I' when starting opinion, use strong evocative words to express attitude and opinion, provide anecdotal evidence to support topic sentence).
    Teacher to validate students own creation.

    Students to copy the recommendations made by the teacher.

    Teacher to monitor group activity in the classroom and clarify or render help if necessary. In groups, students work on improving the 2nd body paragraph about school uniforms inculcating identity in students.
    Collaboratively, students engage in active discussion to recall and apply what they just learnt into a piece of group writing.
    Group can complete elaborating a paragraph based on the techniques taught earlier.

    The Teacher to model how 2nd body paragraph can be improved.

    Individually, students can copy the teacher's model answer or improve on their group work.

    EVALUATION
    3mins

    The teacher asks the students to work on their body paragraph about school uniforms and good discipline.
    Teacher to monitor individual writing in the classroom and clarify or render help if necessary.

    Students then try to follow the strategies and improve another paragraph individually (based on good discipline)

    “School uniforms encourage good discipline because the students who wear the uniform try not to misbehave and do anything bad in public. When the students wear the uniform, they are reminded that they are representing their school and that anything they do, the public will see and report to the school or base the students’ misbehaviour on the school. If a student from the school wears the school uniform, while another from the same school did not, and they both committed a crime, the public will first inform the school about the boy in the uniform. Therefore, I think school uniforms encourage good discipline as students do not wish to disgrace their whole school in public.”

    “I agree to a great extent that school uniforms encourage good discipline. Whenever I wear my school uniform in public, I feel like a representative of Clementi Town Secondary School. Whether I do a good or bad deed, the public will recognise me as a student of the school and judge all other Clementeens to be the same as me. I do not want the public to assume that CTSS is a bad school with bad behaving students because of me, as that would make me feel extremely guilty. Therefore, whenever I wear my school uniform, I must remember to always be on my best behaviour.”

    Individuals can complete elaborating a paragraph based on the techniques taught earlier

    CONCLUSION
    5mins
    The teacher poses the question:
    What have we learnt in this lesson?
    Pupils respond giving their views;
    We have learnt how to write Argumentative Writing using the PEEL technique.
    Consolidating and Improving their level of understanding of Argumentative Writing.

    Lesson Plan

    Lesson Plan on Circulatory System

    Subject: Basic Science

    Theme: The Human Body System

    Topic: Circulatory System

    Sub Topic: Parts of the Circulatory

    Date: dd/mm/yyyy

    Class: Basic 6

    Duration: 35 Minutes

    No of Learners: 30

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
    1. Name the various parts of the circulatory system

      1. Heart
      2. Blood
      3. Blood Vessels
    2. Appreciate the interconnection among the various parts of the circulatory system.

      1. Heart (pump)
      2. Blood (fluid)
      3. Blood vessels (network)
      The heart pumps liquid blood through blood vessels.

    Rationale:

    As blood flows in the body of human beings it passes within specific parts. The learners need to know the major parts of the circulatory system so that they understand their bodies and how they work together.

    Prerequisite/ Previous knowledge:

    The learners know what a system is.

    Teaching/ Learning Materials:

    Learner worksheets, Models, heart specimen

    Reference Materials:

    Basic Science and Technology for Primary Schools Pupils' Book 6 Editors S. T. Bajah and C. B. Oguntonade



    Lesson Development:

    STAGE
    TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNING POINTS
    INTRODUCTION
    full class session (5mins)
    1. What is a system?
    2. Mention some of the systems in your body?
    1. Parts/ groups of organs working together.
    Types of systems in your body are.
    1. Heart
    2. Blood
    3. Blood Vessels
    Learner’s entry points.
    STEP 1
    20mins.
    Development
    The teacher presents the worksheet to learners in groups.
    WORKSHEET
    ACTIVITY 1
    1. Place your right palm firmly on the left side of your chest. What do you feel?
    2. What is the cause of the beat you felt?
    3. What happens when the heartbeats?

    ACTIVITY 2
    1. Look at the upper side of both of your hands
    2. Make a fist. Open and close it continuously for 30 seconds.
    3. Record what you observe on the upper side of your hands.
    4. What is contained inside the vessels?
    5. Where does blood vessels transport blood to?
    6. Where does a blood vessel transport blood from?

    ACTIVITY 3

    Study the diagram below and answer the questions that follow:

    • Blood Circulating

    1. Use the following concepts to label the above diagram:
      heart, blood and blood vessel.
    2. In which direction is blood flowing?
    3. What name can we give to this type of system?

    ACTIVITY 4 (INDIVIDUAL WORK)
    1. What is a system?
    2. Name different types of systems found in your body?
      • Body System
    3. Give the reason why this is referred to as a system.
    CLASSWORK

    INDIVIDUAL WORK

    Study the diagram below and answer the questions that follow:

    • Body System

    1. Write the heading for the system drawn above?
    2. Name three parts of the circulatory system.
    3. Give one reason why the above diagram can be regarded as a system.
    EVALUATION
    5mins
    The teacher guide learners to solve the following problems.
    1. What is a circulatory system?
    2. Name the three parts of the circulatory system?
    3. What is the relationship between the various parts of the circulatory system?
    4. What did you like about the lesson?
    1. It is the flow of blood from the heart to the body organs and back to the heart.
      1. Heart (pump)
      2. Blood (fluid)
      3. Blood vessels (network)
      4. The heart pumps liquid blood through blood vessels.
    Asking the learners questions to assess the achievement of the set objectives.
    CONCLUSION
    2mins
    Harmonization of presentations, summary

    Lesson Note for Primary 6

    Lesson Note on Mathematics

    Subject: Mathematics

    Theme: Area

    Topic: Area of a Circle

    Sub Topic: Deriving the Formula for area of a circle

    Date: xx/xx/xxxx

    Class: Basic 6

    Duration: 35 Minutes

    No of Learners: 30

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
    1. Say what a circle is

    2. A plane curve everywhere equidistant from a given fixed point, the centre.

    3. Derive the formula for the area of a circle

      • Area of a Circle

      Rectangle with the sectors of a circle
      But, Area of Rectangle = Length x Width
      where Length = 1/2 circumference of the circle
      = 1/2 x 2πr = πr
      Width = radius
      Area of the rectangle with the sector of a circle = πr x r
      = πrᶺ2

    Rationale:

    The concept of the area of a circle is useful and applicable in daily real-life activities. The knowledge will assist pupils to understand its application in finding amongst others the base area of wells; pipes; fences; wheels of automobiles and cycles.

    Prerequisite skills and knowledge:

    • Measurement of lengths of the object including Area of rectangles.
    • learners can draw as well as identify parts of a circle particularly the circumference radius, diameter and sectors
    • concept of pi (π)

    Teaching/ Learning Materials:

    Manila cards/Pair of scissors/Glue/starch/Circular Cut-out.

    Reference Materials:

    Online resources

    1. Area of a Circle




    Lesson Development:

    STAGE
    TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNING POINTS
    INTRODUCTION & GROUPING
    full class session (3mins)
    Review learners previous knowledge by asking them to find the area of a rectangle (e.g. length 6cm and width 4cm) (In groups) solve the problem and present their results Learner’s entry points.
    Area of rectangle = length × width
    STEP 1
    5mins.
    Development
    provide learners with circular cut-out
    • Properties of a Circle

    Students identify parts of the circle.

    Recognize circumference, diameter, radius and sectors
    STEP 2
    7mins
    provide pupils in each group the materials mentioned above
    • Section Area of a Circle

    (In groups) cut along the lines of the sectors of the circle to obtain 16 equal sectors

    Different strategies of obtaining sectors.
    STEP 3
    8mins
    guide learners to divide one of the sectors into two equal parts and join this to the widths of both sides of the figure and stick the all cut-outs with the glue on the manila cards as shown
    1. (In groups) describe the figure they have formed
      • Sector area of a Circle

    2. state and name the height(width) of the figure as the radius of the circle.
    3. state and name the length as one-half the circumference of the circle = 1/2 circumference
      = 1/2 (2πr)
      = πr
    4. derive the area of the rectangle formed using the length (πr) and the width (r) as
      A = Length x width
      = πr x r
      = πrᶺ2


    5. (In groups) discuss the relationship between the figure formed and the circle
    1. Forming a rectangle with the sectors of a circle.
      Recognize a semi-circle (e.g. shaded part) as half of the circumference
    2. The figure formed with the sectors of the circle looks like a rectangle Recognize that:
    3. Height or width = radius (r) of the circle and
    4. Length as half circumference of circle = πr
      Area of circle = πr x r
      = πrᶺ2


    5. The figure formed has the same area as that of the circle
    EVALUATION
    5mins
    The teacher guide learners to solve the following problems.
    Calculate the area of a circle whose radius is
    1. 20cm
    2. 1.5m (take π = 22/7)
    Area (A) of a circle = πrᶺ2
    1. But 1cm = 0.01m
      Therefore 20cm = 20 x 0.01
      = 0.2m
      Therefore A = 22/7 x (0.2)ᶺ2
      = 0.125mᶺ2
    2. A = 22/7 x (1.5)ᶺ2
      = 7.017mᶺ2
    Asking the learners questions to assess the achievement of the set objectives.
    CONCLUSION
    2mins
    What is the formula for the area of a circle A = πrᶺ2 Improving their level of understanding of the Area of a circle.
    ASSIGNMENT
    1. If the circumference of a circular plate is 600cm, find the maximum area it covers on the surface of a dining table. (Take π = 3.14)
    2. Deriving the Formula for Area of a Circle
      Hint:
      • Cut out the sectors of the circle along the lines
      • Arrange the sectors to form a figure such the coloured parts are up and the uncoloured down
      • Divide one of the uncoloured sectors into two equal parts and join it to the widths of both sides of the figure and stick all the cut-outs sectors with the glue on the manila cards.
    3. Describe the figure formed after arranging the sectors
    4. What is the:
      • Height of the figure?
      • Length of the figure?
      • Area of the figure formed?
      • What is the relationship between the figure formed and the circle?
      • If the circumference of a circular plate is 600cm, find the maximum area it covers on the surface of a dining table. (Take π = 3.14)
    Students solve other problems. Improving their level of understanding of the Area of a circle.

    Lesson Planning Steps

    Lesson Note on Geometry

    Subject: Mathematics

    Theme: Geometry (Similar Shapes)

    Topic: Similarity & Enlargement

    Sub Topic: Similarity

    Date: xx/xx/xxxx

    Class: J.S.S.3

    Duration: 35 Minutes

    No of Learners: 30

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
    1. Say what similarities mean.

    2. When two or more objects or figures appear the same or equal due to their shape, this property is known as a similarity.

    3. Identify similar objects by comparing corresponding sides.


    4. Identify similar objects by comparing corresponding angles.


    Rationale:

    In this lesson, learners will explore several shapes to find out which of them are similar. Objects are similar if they are proportional in size and shape. The similarity is an aspect that is widely used in our everyday life such as in the manufacturing of biscuits of the same brand being packed in different sizes of boxes that are proportional and therefore cost differently. The similarity is also used in the construction sector.

    Prerequisite/ Previous knowledge:

    Measurements, scale drawing, ratios, conversions from one unit to another, sets.

    Teaching/ Learning Materials:

    Mathematical set, real objects, worksheets, pencils, rulers, and A4 sheet papers.

    Reference Materials:

    New General Mathematics for Junior Secondary Schools Books 3 By Pearson



    Lesson Development:

    STAGE
    TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNING POINTS
    INTRODUCTION
    full class session (5mins)
    Learners are provided with several different objects. Photographs of different sizes, plastic bottles of different sizes, a mathematical set ruler, 30cm ruler, cut-outs of different shapes and soap of the same brand but in different sizes.
    1. Observe the objects and match them accordingly.
    2. Why have you matched them in that form?
    Group the objects with common features
    1. They are of the same shape
    2. They are of the same design.
    3. They perform the same function.
    Learner’s entry points.
    STEP 1
    20mins.
    Development and Grouping
    How would you describe that objects are similar?
    You have two sheets of A4 paper.
    1. What do you notice about the two sheets of A4 paper provided?
    2. A)
      • A4 Paper

    Students respond to the teacher's question.
    1. Same shape.
    2. The lengths of both sheets of A4 paper are equal.
    3. The widths of both sheets of A4 paper are equal.
    4. The angles of both sheets of paper are 90 degrees and corresponding to each other.
    Developing the ideal of the concept similarity
    Fold one A4 sheet of paper equally once along the length.
    B)
    • Folded A4 Paper

    1. What do you notice about the two sheets of paper?
    2. What can you say about the sides’ length and widths of both sheets of paper?
    Compare the two sheets of paper. What do you notice about the sheets?
    1. The folded sheet is half the A4 sheet of paper.
    2. The width of the folded sheet and that of the A4 sheet of paper is equal.
    3. The length of the A4 sheet of paper is twice the length of the folded sheet of paper.
    4. The lengths are in a ratio of 1: 2, while the widths are in the ratio of 1:1
    5. The lengths are in the ratio of 1:1 while the widths are in the ratio of 1:2
    6. The angles are all equal to 90 degrees and are corresponding to each other.
    Improving their level of understanding on similarity.
    Fold the folded sheet along the width.
    C)
    • Re-folded A4 paper

    Look at the shapes and discuss with your neighbour what you observe about them.
    1. The ratio of the corresponding lengths is 1:2
    2. The ratio of the corresponding width is 1:2
    3. The angles in all the sheets of paper are 90 degrees and therefore corresponding.
    4. A and B, B and C are not similar, because the ratios of the corresponding sides are not the same although their angles are equal to 90 degrees.
    5. A and A, A and C are similar because the ratios of the corresponding sides are equal and their corresponding angles are equal to 90 degrees.
    Identify similar objects by comparing corresponding sides and angles.
    EVALUATION
    5mins
    The teacher asks the students questions.
    1. Identify which of the following figures are similar to each other. Give reasons for your choice.

    1. A and D are similar because the ratios of the corresponding sides are equal and their corresponding angles are equal to 90 degrees.
    2. C and J are similar because of the ratios of the corresponding sides.
    3. E, I and F are similar because the ratios of the corresponding sides are equal and their corresponding angles are equal to 90 degrees.
    4. G and K are similar because the ratios of the corresponding sides are equal and their corresponding angles are equal to 90 degrees.
    5. H and L are similar because the ratios of the corresponding sides are equal and their corresponding angles are equal to 90 degrees.
    Asking the learners questions to assess the achievement of the set objectives.
    CONCLUSION
    5mins
    How would you describe similar objects? Objects are similar if;
    Their corresponding sides are in the same ratio.
    Their corresponding angles are equal.
    Improving their level of understanding on Similarity.

    Teaching Method

    Asei Lesson Plan on Biology

    Subject: Biology

    Theme: Ecology of Population

    Topic: Ecology

    Sub Topic: Interaction of Living Organisms in an Ecosystem

    Date: dd/mm/yyyy

    Class: SSS 3

    Duration: 35 Minutes

    No of Learners: 30

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
    1. Defined an Ecology

    2. Ecology is the study of the inter-relationship between living organisms and their environment.

    3. Defined an Ecosystem

    4. An ecosystem is a term coined from ecology and system. It is a natural unit that is made up of non-living things and living things, all of which interact constantly to form a stable system.

    5. Identify the major types of ecosystem

      1. Terrestrial Ecosystem.
        • Forest Ecosystem.
        • Grassland Ecosystem.
        • Desert Ecosystem.
      2. Aquatic Ecosystem
        • Marine Ecosystem
        • Freshwater Ecosystem

    6. To construct simple food chains and food webs using organisms in their locality.

      • Food chain and web

    Rationale:

    Students are aware that the ecosystem is composed of several organisms interacting in their environment. Their interaction is based or dependent on the flow of energy. It is therefore important for students to understand food chains and food webs.

    Target Skills:

    • Observation
    • Construction
    • Analysis
    • Inference
    • Collaboration
    • Manipulation
    • Communication

    Prerequisite/ Previous knowledge:

    Living and non-living things, Living organisms, internal and external structures of organisms, physiology and adaptations of organisms.

    Learning Materials:

    Pictures of different organisms representing different trophic levels, Flip Chart, stickers, Manila chart, masking tape

    Reference Materials:

    Biology A New Approach For Senior Secondary Schools and Colleges By E. O. Egho


    Lesson Development:

    STAGE
    TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNING POINTS
    INTRODUCTION
    full class session (5mins)
    The teacher introduces the lesson by posing a scenario of a flood where animals were displaced from their original environment. The task of the students now is to return the animals to their habitats.
    Activity 1: “Take them back home”

    Teacher issues out the materials to the pupils

    Questions
    1. Why did you put the different organisms where they are (homes)?
    2. What are the major types of ecosystems that you have created?

    Teacher issues out the materials to the pupils

    Students use the given pictures of the organisms to fit them into the most suitable environment

    Students stick their charts on the wall and a brief class discussion of the activity ensues

    The students answer the question posed by the teacher.

    1. That is their habitat (it is a natural home).
      1. Terrestrial Ecosystem.
        • Forest Ecosystem.
        • Grassland Ecosystem.
        • Desert Ecosystem.
      2. Aquatic Ecosystem
        • Marine Ecosystem
        • Freshwater Ecosystem

    Learner’s entry points.
    STEP 1
    5mins.
    Development and Grouping

    The teacher asks students to form groups and choose their leaders and secretaries.

    From the activity carried out, No organism, as it were, leads its life in isolation; it constantly depends on other living organisms and certain environmental factors to survive, though it must be prepared to cope with problems posed by some of these organisms.

    The teacher explains to students; 'Eco' is connected with the environment (natural habitat), while 'logy' is connected with scientific study/ discipline.
    A system, on the other hand, is a group of interacting, interrelated, or interdependent elements forming a complex whole.

    The teacher asks the students what study do they think could be used to study the inter-relationship between living organisms and their environment.

    The teacher asks the students, what will the constant interaction of the non-living and the living thing in a natural unit, call?

    Students form groups and choose their leaders and secretaries.

    Learners expected response. Learners reflect on inter-relationship between living organisms and their environment. This could be called ecology.

    Learners expected response. Learners reflect on the constant interaction of the non-living and the living thing in a natural unit. This could be called an ecosystem.

    Being able to defined Ecology and Ecosystem
    Learners are asked to define what ecology and ecosystem are in their own words.

    Ecology is the study of the relationships between organisms and their environment.

    The ecosystem is a system formed by the interaction of an organism with its environment.

    Confirming the meaning of ecology and ecosystem.
    STEP 2
    15mins.
    Activity 2: using the same materials issued for activity 1

    Who eats who?

    The teacher now asks the students to construct a food web using the same materials issued for activity 1.

    Students to use the pictures to construct a food web.

    Each group displays their food web and the class comments.

    1. Food web

    Students construct a food web.
    EVALUATION
    3mins
    The teacher asks the students questions.
    1. What is an ecosystem?
    2. What is Ecology?
    3. What are the producers in this food web and what is their importance?
    4. What do the arrows in the food web represent?
    5. What will be the effect of over poaching antelopes in a food web?
    6. Construct 3 food chains from your food web with at least four organisms
    1. An ecosystem is a natural unit that is made up of non-living things and living things, all of which interact constantly to form a stable system.
    2. Ecology is the study of the inter-relationship between living organisms and their environment.
    3. The green grass in the ecosystem are the producers, they manufacture their food through the process of photosynthesis. The animal on the other hand cannot make their food; they depend on plants either directly or indirectly to form their required compound.
    4. The arrows represent the flow of food from one organism to another.
    5. Poaching antelopes will decline the population of the antelopes within a habitat, which in turn disrupts the food chain.

    Asking the learners questions to assess the achievement of the set objectives.
    CONCLUSION
    5mins
    The teacher poses the question:
    What have we learnt in this lesson?
    Pupils respond giving their views;
    We have learnt how to construct simple food chains and food webs using organisms in our locality.
    Consolidating and Improving their level of understanding of Ecology.

    Teacher Education

    Teaching methods

    Subject: Physics

    Theme: Electrostatic

    Topic: Electrostatic II

    Sub Topic: Application of Capacitor

    Date: dd/mm/yyyy

    Class: S.S.S I

    Duration: 35 Minutes

    No of Learners: 30

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
    1. Defined and Explain the work of a capacitor

    2. A capacitor is an electronic device that can store electrical charge.

      It can also be defined as an electric discharge resulting from the accumulation of electric charge on an insulated body.

      Working of a Capacitor: A capacitor consists of two metal plates that are separated by a non-conducting substance or dielectric. The metal plates are separated by a distance “d”, and a dielectric material is placed in-between the plates. The dielectric material is the main substance that helps in storing electrical energy.

    3. Describe the charging and discharging of a capacitor

    4. Charging of a Capacitor: If we connect a power source or a battery to the metal plates of the capacitor, a current will try to flow, or the electrons from the plate connected to the positive lead of the battery will start moving to the plate connected to the negative lead of the battery. However, because of the dielectric between the plates, the electrons won’t be able to pass through the capacitor, so they will start accumulating on the plate. This is called charging.

      Discharging of a capacitor: Now, if we shorten the two ends of the capacitor through a load, a current will start flowing through the load. The accumulated electrons from the first plate will start moving to the second plate until both plates become back again electrically neutral. This is called discharging.

    5. Appreciate simple designs/applications of capacitors.

      1. AC to DC Converter: A typical application example are capacitors used in DC adapters. For converting the AC voltage into a DC voltage a diode rectifier is usually used, but without the help of capacitors, it won’t be able to do the job. The output of the rectifier is a waveform. So while the output of the rectifier rises the capacitor charges, and while the output of the rectifier declines, the capacitor discharges and in that way smooth the DC output.
      2. Signal Filtering: Signal filtering is another application example of capacitors. Because of their specific response time they can block low-frequency signals while allowing higher frequencies to pass through. This is used in radio receivers for tuning out undesired frequencies and in crossover circuits inside speakers, for separating the low frequencies for the woofer and the higher frequencies for the tweeter.
      3. Capacitors as Energy Storage: Another rather obvious use of the capacitors is for energy storage and supply. Although they can store considerably lower energy compared to the same size battery, their lifespan is much better and they are capable of delivering energy much faster which makes them more suitable for applications where a high burst of power is needed.


    Rationale:

    Capacitors are part and parcel of electronic gadgets that are accessed and utilized basically in every home from where learners have grown. Today's learners are creative, critical and need to have a basic understanding of the gadgets they utilize. The lesson would enable learners to understand the use of capacitors, troubleshoot and even correct problems of capacitors in gadgets.

    Prerequisite/ Previous knowledge:

    Type and laws of charges, Current electricity flow, Mains Electricity, Electromagnetic Induction

    Learning Resources:

    Size D dry cells, connecting wires, aluminium foil, various damaged electronic devices or circuits with capacitors.

    Reference Materials:

    Senior Secondary Physics. By P. N. Okeke and M. W. Anyakoha

    Lesson Development:

    STAGE
    TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNING POINTS
    INTRODUCTION
    full class session (5mins)
    Q/A on learners' prerequisite knowledge of capacitors
    • Law of charges: Things that have the same charge push each other away (they repel each other). This is called the Law of Charges. Things that have more electrons than protons are negatively charged, while things with fewer electrons than protons are positively charged. Things with the same charge repel each other.
    • Laws of charges:- Opposite charges attract each other. Like charges repel each other. Charged objects attract neutral objects.
    • Types of charges: There are two types of electric charge: positive and negative (commonly carried by protons and electrons respectively). Like charges repel each other and unlike charges attract each other. An object with an absence of net charge is referred to as neutral.
    Learner’s entry points.
    STEP 1
    5mins.
    Development
    Distribute the devices and circuits to the learners and allow them to identify items marked. Receive reports Learners identify the device as a capacitor. Being able to isolate a capacitor from a circuit
    STEP 2
    15mins.
    Teacher guide learners to inspect the capacitors and note down their capacitance. Learners inspect the capacitors and note down their capacitance. Reading capacitance of capacitors
    STEP 3
    20 mins
    Guide the students to design a capacitor using available materials in the lab, test its storage and suggest how to improve the charge storage. Learners design a capacitor using available materials in the lab, test its storage and improve the charge storage. Being able to come up with a simple capacitor.
    1. Increase area of overlap
    2. Decrease the distance between the plates
    3. Dielectric material used
    STEP 4
    Group Work (5mins)
    Guide the students to share any new things/activities they have discovered as a way to harmonize classroom activities. Learners share any new things/activities they have discovered. Maximum benefit to each participant from activities carried out.
    EVALUATION
    3mins
    The teacher asks the students questions.
    1. From the activities carried out, what are a capacity and the working of a capacity?
    2. Explain the charging and discharging of a capacitor.
    3. Explain simple designs/ application of capacitors.
    1. A device for accumulating and holding a charge of electricity, consisting of two equally charged conducting surfaces having opposite signs and separated by a dielectric.
    2. A capacitor is a charge by connecting a power source or a battery to the metal plates of the capacitor. To discharge a fully charged capacitor, a load is connected across the two ends of the capacitor and the current will start flowing through the load. The accumulated electrons from the first plate will start moving to the second plate until both plates become back again electrically neutral.
    3. A capacitor is constructed out of two metal plates, separated by an insulating material called a dielectric. The plates are conductive and are usually made of aluminium, tantalum or other metals, while the dielectric can be made out of any kind of insulating material such as paper, glass, ceramic or anything that obstructs the flow of the current.
    Asking the learners questions to assess the achievement of the set objectives.
    CONCLUSION
    2mins
    Teachers wrap up from the learners' observations made in the group‟ activities. The students listen to the teacher and copy down notes. Consolidating and harmonizing scientific concepts.

    Lesson Note for Senior Secondary

    Lesson Plan on Physics

    Subject: Physics

    Theme: Electrostatic

    Topic: Electrostatic I

    Sub Topic: Charge Distribution

    Date: dd/mm/yyyy

    Class: S.S.S 1

    Duration: 30 Minutes

    No of Learners: 30

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
    1. Defined static electricity.

    2. Is an electrical charge that accumulates on an object when it is rubbed against another object.

      It can also be defined as an electric discharge resulting from the accumulation of electric charge on an insulated body.

    3. Describe charge distribution on a charged conductor.

    4. Examination of the distribution of charge over the surface of a conductor shows that the charges generally concentrate at places where the surface is sharply curved. Thus the surface charge density or charge per unit area is very high at sharp points with very small areas. It is also found that the charges reside only on the surface of a conductor and not inside.

    Rationale:

    Charge distribution is an important aspect in the understanding concentration of charges in different shapes and this helps us get to know the working principle of thunder arrestors.

    Prerequisite/ Previous knowledge:

    Types of laws, charges and charging methods.

    Learning Materials:

    Electroscope, pear-shaped sphere.

    Reference Materials:

    Senior Secondary Physics. By P. N. Okeke and M. W. Anyakoha

    Lesson Development:

    STAGE
    TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNING POINTS
    INTRODUCTION
    full class session (5mins)
    Through question and answer teacher guides the learners to determine pre-requisite skills on type and laws of charges.
    • Law of charges: Things that have the same charge push each other away (they repel each other). This is called the Law of Charges. Things that have more electrons than protons are negatively charged, while things with fewer electrons than protons are positively charged. Things with the same charge repel each other.
    • Laws of charges:- Opposite charges attract each other. Like charges repel each other. Charged objects attract neutral objects.
    • Types of charges: There are two types of electric charge: positive and negative (commonly carried by protons and electrons respectively). Like charges repel each other and unlike charges attract each other. An object with an absence of net charge is referred to as neutral.
    Learner’s entry points.
    STEP 1
    5mins.
    Development
    Teacher to provide learners with aluminium foil, razor blade, cotton blade and allow them to identify the items. Students identify the apparatus as aluminium foil, razor blade, cotton blade. Being able to identify the apparatus.
    STEP 2
    15mins.
    Teacher guide learners to cut the aluminium foil into a pear shape, suspend it using cotton thread, rub ebonite rod with a piece of cloth, bring it near the sharp end of your pear-shaped foil the rounded part, note down the observation. Learners follow the teacher's directives. Being able to cut the aluminium foil into pear shape Test the strength of attraction on both ends.
    STEP 3
    Group Work (5mins)
    Guide the Students to form four groups and ask them to choose their leaders and secretaries. Learners form four groups and choose their leaders and secretaries. Inculcating leadership skills, boldness, competitive spirit, teamwork, and a sense of responsibility among students.
    STEP 4
    5mins
    Ask students to share their observations in groups. Students share their observation Collaboration among group members, manipulation of results and observing that the sharp point moves more.
    EVALUATION
    3mins
    The teacher asks the students questions.
    1. From your observation what is static electricity?
    2. Explain charge distribution on a conductor
    1. An electrical charge, often created by friction, consisting of stationary ions that do not move in a current.
    2. Charges generally concentrate at places where the surface of a conductor is sharply curved.
    Asking the learners questions to assess the achievement of the set objectives.
    CONCLUSION
    2mins
    Teachers wrap up from the learners' observations. The students listen to the teacher and copy down notes. Consolidating and harmonizing scientific concepts.

    Lesson Plan for Teachers

    Lesson Note for Junior Secondary

    Subject: Mathematics

    Theme: Probability

    Topic: Probability

    Sub Topic: Range of Probability measure 0 ≤ P(x) ≤ 1

    Date: xx/xx/xxxx

    Class: J.S.S 2

    Duration: 35 Minutes

    No of Learners: 30

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
    1. Say what probability is.

    2. Probability is the study of possible occurrences in everyday life. When we say possible occurrences, we are referring to possible events such as rainfalls, sunshine, winning a football match, lossing a football match, eating, going to the library etc.

    3. Write the general formula for probability(Pr).

      • Probability formula

    4. Determine the range of probability measures (Solve problems on probability).

    5. Example.
      If we toss a fair die, what is the probability that it will show 3?

      Solution.
      Probability of three

      • Probability of three

      Number of required outcome = { 3 } is One(1) Number of possible outcome = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 } is Six(6)
      ꓽ∙ Pr(3) = 1/6

    Rationale:

    Probability is applicable in our daily life in such areas as weather prediction, predicting the risks of new medical treatments, predicting results in sports, among many areas. Moreover, companies and business people can use probability to predict the chances that their sales will go up by a certain per cent in a given year. Probability enables you to make decisions in situations where there are observable patterns with some degree of uncertainty.

    Prerequisite/ Previous knowledge:

    Students have learnt Fractions, Decimals, Algebra, Statistics 1.

    Learning Materials:

    Computing device, manila paper, coins.

    Reference Materials:

    New General Mathematics for Junior Secondary Schools Books 1 By Pearson



    Lesson Development:

    STAGE
    TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNING POINTS
    INTRODUCTION
    full class session (5mins)
    Comparing fractions and decimals
    1/4 of 3
    Pupils respond to the teacher's question.
    1/4 x 3 = 3/4
    Multiplication of fraction, Division of fractions, Conversion of decimals to fractions and vice versa. Revision of the previous knowledge on fractions and decimals.
    STEP 1
    2mins.
    Development
    Teacher to provide learners with coins and allow them to identify the items. Pupils identify the apparatus as coins Being able to identify the apparatus.
    STEP 2
    5mins.
    The teacher asks learners to toss coins and progressively compare the cumulative fractions of Head(H) or Tail(T) at a tally of 10. Learners toss coins and progressively compare the cumulative fractions of Head(H) or Tail(T) at a tally of 10.
    • Probability of a heat, tail of a coin


    Determine the probability measure of Head and Tail of fair toss coin at entries of 10.
    EVALUATION
    7mins
    The teacher asked the pupils questions.
    1. From your calculation of toss coin at entries of 10, what is the meaning of probability?
    2. What is the general formula for probability?
    3. Calculate the probability of a toss coin for a Heads or a Tails at entries of 12.
    4. What is your observation for Pr(H) and Pr(T) above
    Pupils respond to teachers questions.
    • 1)  Probability(Pr) is the study of possible occurrences in everyday life.
    • 2)  the General formula for probability(Pr).
      • Probability formula

    • 3)  at a tally of 12 entries Pr (H) and Pr(T).

    • 4)  the General formula for probability(Pr).
    Asking the learners questions to assess the achievement of the set objectives.
    CONCLUSION
    3mins
    A coin is tossed once for two teams playing a football match. What is the probability that the team with the head starts the game?

    HINT:   there are only two outcomes in a coin namely: 1 for head and 1 for a tail.
    The students respond to the teacher's question.
    1. Probability of head, tail

    The probability range
    0 ≤ P(x) ≤ 1
    ASSIGNMENT Give them other problems to solve.
    1. In a class of 24 boys, and 12 girls. If a student is picked at random, what is the probability that the student is a girl?
    2. What is the probability that a bottle of mineral chosen at random from a crate containing 8 bottles of Fanta, 4 bottles of Sprite and 12 bottles of Coke is:
      a) Coke
      b) Sprite
    3. A letter is chosen at random from the word, PROBABILITY. Find the probability of choosing the letter B.

      HINT: The letter PROBABILITY has 2 B's out of a total of 11
    4. A letter is chosen at random from the English alphabet. Find the probability that it is a B.
    5. A fair six-sided die is thrown once. What is the probability of obtaining a 4?
    6. What is the probability of having an odd number in a single toss of a fair die?
    Pupils solve other problems. Improving their level of understanding on the probability range 0 ≤ P(x) ≤ 1.

    Lesson Plan

    Lesson Plan on Basic Science

    Subject: Basic Science

    Theme: You and Environment

    Topic: Erosion

    Sub Topic: Wind Erosion

    Date: dd/mm/yyyy

    Class: Basic 5

    Duration: 30 Minutes

    No of Learners: 35

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
    1. Define erosion.

    2. The wearing away of the surface soil by water or wind is called erosion.

    3. Mention the effect of wind erosion.

      1. nutrition rich topsoil would be taken away
      2. may make the land unusable.
      3. can cause landslides
      4. makes the soil poor and reduces the yields of crops.

    4. Describe ways of controlling wind erosion.

      1. Planting of grasses e.g. Bahama grass or carpet grass.
      2. Planting of trees.
      3. Planting of cover crops.
      4. Making ridges at right angles to the slope of the land.

    Rationale:

    Wind has an important effect on the soil such as erosion. Hence learning the effect of wind on the soil will prepare the learning learners to prevent soil from being eroded. It will also prepare the learners for learning higher related concepts like an earthquake, Pollution etc.

    Prerequisite/ Previous knowledge:

    Learners are familiar with how strong wind carries some materials (including sand particles) which often wear away softer layers of the soil leaving the harder part sticking out.

    Learning Materials:

    These include Pictures, grass, stones, trays, sand, water, seedlings, cup, stones and blowers.

    Reference Materials:

    NERDC (2009), Basic Science and Technology, Book 5.


    Lesson Development:

    STAGE
    TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNING POINTS
    INTRODUCTION
    Learners to look at the pictures on the board to have an insight on erosion. (5mins)
    The teacher presents pictures/ charts to the class and asks the following questions:
    What can you see in these pictures?
    What conclusion can you make about what had happened with the soil?
    Learners look at the pictures/ charts shown by the teacher and respond to the questions:
    Soil with few leaves of grass, eroded land etc.
    Learners develop ideas about the concept of erosion.
    DEVELOPMENT
    Step 1. Learners to carry out activities that will show the effect of erosion (7mins)
    The teacher asks the learner's to carry out the activities as instructed in their worksheet and record their observations. Learners carry out the activities as instructed. Learners observe and discuss the effect of the air on the soil. And record their observation. (The topsoil dispersed all over the pan making galleys and valleys of soil. This shows that strong wind causes erosion on the soil).
    STEP 2
    Learners to observe the differences between the 2 activities (5mins)
    Learners place some grasses, stones, plants, around the soil, and carry out the activities, as instructed in their worksheet. Learners observe how wind affects the soil when there is little or no cover on the area of the soil exposed. (The soil did not blow easily, the material did not allow the air and the water to carry plenty of soil).
    STEP 3
    Learners have the idea that the erosion effect could be minimized when the soil is covered. (7 mins)
    The teacher asks learners to repeat the above exercise covering the soil with some materials as instructed in their worksheet. Learners explain what happens to the soil when there is little or no cover (Using their worksheets). Learners realized that erosion could be minimizing when the soil is covered.
    The teacher asks the learners to present and explains their work on the board based on what happened to the topsoil in the 2 activities. Learners present their work to the whole class.
    STEP 4
    Pupils use their worksheet to draw and label what they observed
    (5mins).
    The teacher asks the learners to draw the topsoil to show the effect of wind. Learners draw to show the effect of wind on the soil. Learners draw the topsoil showing galleys and valleys.
    EVALUATION
    Learners to relate the 2 activities to a real-life situation.
    (5mins)
    The teacher asks the learners to think and mention activities in the environment that can pave way for erosion to take place. And some places where traces of erosion could be seen either in the school compound or elsewhere. Learners cite examples of where they see traces of erosion in their area and the activities that cause them.
    1. Building construction
    2. Mining
    3. Lumbering
    4. Weeding, etc.

    Soil erosion is seen in our farms, roadside, playing ground. etc
    CONCLUSION The teacher use pictures to explain to the learners that there are natural forces that affect erosion and displacement of soil. Learners look at the pictures and follow the teachers' explanations. Learners realized that erosion is a natural phenomenon; some activities carried out by man can accelerate the rate of erosion. Pupils recognized that wind does not only carry particles of materials from their origin but also change the nature of the environment by causing erosion.
    ASSIGNMENT
    1. Defined erosion
    2. What is the effect of wind erosion on our environment?
    3. How can these effects in (2) above can be avoided or reduced?
    Learners answer other questions. Improving their level of understanding of erosion.

    Lesson Plan Format

    Lesson Plan on Mathematics

    Subject: Mathematics

    Theme: Numbers and Numeration

    Topic: Fraction

    Sub Topic: Multiplication of Fraction

    Date: xx/xx/xxxx

    Class: Basic 6

    Duration: 35 Minutes

    No of Learners: 30

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
    1. Draw simple diagrams to express the multiplication of a fraction by fractions.

      1. Fraction 1/2 of 1/3

    2. Solve problems on multiplication of a fraction by fraction.

      1. Result of fraction 1/2 of 1/3

    Rationale:

    The knowledge of this topic will enable learners to share items or objects among themselves without stress, for example; money, fruit, biscuits etc.

    Prerequisite/ Previous knowledge:

    Pupils have learnt about the multiplication of fractions of whole numbers.

    Learning Materials:

    crayon, Pencil, Eraser, A4 paper and ruler, marker, pen etc.

    Reference Materials:

    National Mathematics Centre Teaching Module for Primary School Six.



    Lesson Development:

    STAGE
    TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNING POINTS
    INTRODUCTION
    full class session (5mins)
    Multiply 1/4 by 3
    Pupils respond to the teacher's question.
    1/4 x 3 = 3/4
    Revision of the previous knowledge of multiplication of a fraction by the whole number.
    STEP 1
    2mins.
    The teacher gives the pupils instructions by asking them to arrange themselves into two groups. Pupils respond to teachers instructions by grouping themselves and choose their leaders and secretary. Developing leadership skills.
    STEP 2
    5mins.
    The teacher shares the materials into the two groups (paper and eraser) and gives them instructions.

    1. Fold the paper horizontally into two equal parts and shade one part using a red marker.

    2. Folding the paper vertically into three equal parts and shade one part using a blue marker.
    Pupils identify the materials like paper and carry out the teacher's instructions:
    1. They fold the paper horizontally into 2 equal parts and shade one part.
      1. Fraction 1/2
    2. They fold the other paper vertically into 3 equal parts and shade one part.
      1. Fraction 1/3
    Identifying the learning materials for teaching.


    Identifying fractions (i.e 1/2)


    Identifying fractions (i.e 1/3)
    STEP 3
    10mins
    The teacher asked the pupils to join the two papers together and ask them to state their findings. The pupils joined the two papers together to demonstrate the multiplication of a fraction by fractions.
    • Fraction 1/6
    Achievement of the result by multiplication.
    1/2 X 1/3 = 1/6
    EVALUATION
    7mins
    The teacher asked the pupils questions.
    1. 2/3 X 1/3
    2. 1/3 X 1/3
    Pupils respond to teachers questions.
    1. Fraction 2/3 - 1/3
    Asking the learners questions to assess the achievement of the set objectives.
    CONCLUSION
    3mins
    The teacher asks the pupils to draw simple diagrams to illustrate the multiplication of fractions by fractions.
    1. 1/2 X 1/3

      The teacher asks the pupils to copy it into their exercise book.
    The pupils respond to the teacher's question.
    1. Fraction 1/2 -1/3
    Acquiring/ improving writing skills.
    ASSIGNMENT Give them other problems to solve. Pupils solve other problems. Improving their level of understanding.

    Lesson Note Format

    Lesson Note for Basic 6

    Subject: Mathematics

    Theme: Number and Numeration

    Topic: Ratios and Proportions

    Sub Topic: Equivalent Ratio

    Date: dd/mm/yyyy

    Class: Basic 6

    Duration: 35 Minutes

    No of Learners: 30

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
    1. Explain the meaning of Equivalent Ratio

      Equivalent ratios are ratios that have direct proportional change when you compare either by multiplication or division.

    2. Solve problems on the equivalent ratio

      (Example of a bread maker).

    Rationale:

    The knowledge of ratio is being used in our daily lives such as cooking, construction. Equivalent ratios are ratios that have a directly proportional change, hence the knowledge will help them to jay learning foundation for proportion.

    Prerequisite/ Previous knowledge:

    Fraction (Division) and Multiplication.

    Learning Materials:

    Candles.

    Reference Materials:

    National Mathematics Centre Teaching Module for Primary School Six.


    Lesson Development:

    STAGE
    TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNING POINTS
    INTRODUCTION
    full class session (10mins)
    The teacher introduces the lesson by giving two pupils (Musa and Aisha) candles as shown in the table below respectively.

    Musa ? 2 3 4 5 ? ?
    Aisha ? 6 9 12 15 ? ?
    Some pupils compare by finding the difference (candles), an example of column one, 6 - 2 = 4
    If Musa has 2 candles, Aisha has 4 more candles.
    Comparing quantities by difference.
    The teacher asks all the pupils to compare the number of candles given to Musa and Aisha for all the columns. Some pupils compare by division i.e (6/2) candles = 3, Aisha's candles are 3 times that of Musa for the first column. Comparing quantities by division.
    The teacher asks pupils to explain what they have done.
    The teacher asks pupils to look at what they have done and complete the table considering how they compare the candles given to Musa and Aisha.
    Pupils explain that they have substracted Musa's candles from that of Aisha and also divided Aisha's candle by Musa's candle for all the columns.
    The teacher then asks, "which is the easier way to compare"?




    The teacher comments on what the pupils have done by telling them, they have compared the candles in two ways i.e by Subtraction and Division. He then explains the meaning of equivalent ratios as ratios that have direct proportional change when you compare either by division or multiplication.
    In order to complete the table, To complete the table, it is easier to compare by division and multiplication The concept of equivalent ratio.
    Therefore the ratio of Aisha's candles to Musa's is directly proportional i.e 3:1. The sign indicates ratio and it is read as ratio 3 to 1. We can also say that the ratio of Musa's to that of Aisha is 1:3 or 1 to 3

    The teacher asks pupils to read the expression.
    It means that for every 1 that Musa has, Aisha has 3. We can also write it as 1/3
    The pupil's listen and copy the definition of equivalent ratio into their note. Pupils read the expression as
    ratio 1 to 3 or 1: 3
    Expression of ratio.
    DEVELOPMENT
    Step 1. Group Work (2mins)
    The teacher groups the pupils into 5 and names the the groups' A to E with these numbers of pupils per group respectively
    2, 4, 6, 8, 10.
    Pupils arrange themselves into their various groups.
    STEP 2
    (Partial grouping)
    (2mins)
    The teacher asks pupils to share the candles she brought to the class, 2 candles to each pupil. The pupils share the candle among themselves.
    The teacher asks the pupil to compare the quantities of candles in their various groups with the numbers of pupils. The pupils make a comparison i.e the quantities of candles and the number of pupils in group A, i.e 4 candles to 2 pupils 4:2 = 2:1 To observe how quantities change.
    STEP 3
    (group work) (5mins)
    To observe how quantities change. Some of the pupils may observe that as the number of pupils is increasing in the group, the number of candles is also increasing i.e When 2 pupils get 4 candles, 4 pupils get 8 candles. hence the increase of one quantity results in the increase of the other. To observe how quantities change.
    STEP 4
    (Group work)
    (5mins).
    The teacher summarises the activities on candles by asking the pupils what they have learnt sharing the candles.

    The teacher concluded by telling the pupils that their observations were correct. The ratio of the candles to the number of pupils was directly proportional hence the meaning of equivalent ratio.
    Some of the pupils respond by telling the teacher that as the candles for Musa is increasing, that of Aisha is also increasing. Then as the number of pupils is increasing, the number of candles was also increasing.
    EVALUATION
    Simplification of ratio(Individual)
    (6mins).
    The teacher gives the pupils the following exercises:
    1. A bread maker has 750g of flour to be added to 500g of butter and 600g of sugar to make bread. Find the ratio of;
      1. Butter to Flour
      2. Four to Sugar
      3. Butter to Sugar

    2. If there are 30 girls and 20 boys in a class, what is the ratio of me = girls to the boys?.
    The pupils attempt the question:
    1. Expected Responses
      1. Butter to Sugar
        500g: 750g
        50: 75
        10: 15
        2: 5

      2. Flour to Sugar
        750g: 600g
        75: 60
        15: 12
        5: 4

      3. Butter to Sugar
        500g: 600g
        50: 60
        15: 12
        5: 6

    2. The ratio of girls to boys
      30: 20
      2: 3
    Pupils ability to solve problems on ratio
    Conclusion
    (5mins)
    The teacher summarizes the lesson base on the pupil's response to the above questions to enhance pupils deeper understanding and asks a pupil that gots' it right to also explain.

    The teacher concludes by clarifying areas of confusion and also informs the pupils that ratios can also be simplified even though they are equivalent.
    Pupils listening and exchange ideas.



    Pupils ask questions on the area they find difficult and quickly go through the lesson with the teacher.
    A deeper understanding of equivalent ratio.
    ASSIGNMENT
    1. Pencils are sold at 30 for $25. Kemisola bought 90 pencils. How much did she pay?
    2. 24 cans of vegetable oil weigh 36 kg. What is the weight of 72 cans?
    3. Express each of these as a ratio reduced to the lowest term.
      • 12 grams: 48 grams
      • 25 mins: 1 h 20 mins
    .
    Pupils solve other problems on ratio. Improving their level of understanding of ratio.

    Lesson Note

    Lesson Note on Basic Science

    Subject: Basic Science

    Theme: You and Energy

    Topic: Force

    Sub Topic: Frictional Force

    Date: dd/mm/yyyy

    Class: Basic 6

    Duration: 35 Minutes

    No of Learners: 30

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
    1. Say what friction means.

    2. Friction is a force that opposes or prevents the motion of two objects in contact with each other. Friction is a kind of force that makes objects in motion stop.

    3. Mention five areas where friction occurs in our daily lives.

      1. Rubbing/ Clapping our hands.
      2. Pounding in a mortar.
      3. Ironing clothes.
      4. Grinding pepper with two stones with flat surfaces.
      5. Smoothening planks with carpenters tool.

    4. Describe how friction can be increased or decreased.

      1. Smooth surfaces decrease friction because movement is easy while rough surfaces increase friction because movement is slow and difficult.
      2. Sliding objects increase friction while rolling objects decrease friction

    5. State at least two advantages of friction.

      1. It leads to producing good finished product e.g pounding.
      2. It enables us to stop our vehicles when in motion.

    6. State three disadvantages of friction.

      1. It causes a change in the shaps of some objects.
      2. It causes clothes to wear out..
      3. It can cause continued constipation which could lead to the pile and serious health challenges if food is eaten without drinking water.

    Rationale:

    Frictional force is very important in our daily lives. Sometimes it helps us but can also serve as a hindrance but we cannot move if friction does not exist or if by any means we started moving we would not be able to stop.

    Prerequisite/ Previous knowledge:

    Pupils have learnt about force and if effects, such as:

    • It produces a change in the position of objects,
    • It stops moving objects and changes the shape of objects.

    Learning Materials:

    Bottled water, rough surface, piece of the carton as smooth surface and a container filled with gravels, some balls, olive oil, soapy water and Vaseline.

    Reference Materials:

    Basic Science and technology for Primary School Pupils Book 6 by P. Asun and others.


    Lesson Development:

    STAGE
    TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNING POINTS
    Introduction full class session (5mins) The teacher asks learners questions based on the previous topic, force.
    • What is force?
    • Mention there effects of force?
    Learners expected response:
    • Force is a push or a pull
    • The force that causes objects to move or stop.
    • Force also causes objects to change their original shapes.
    Revising the previous lesson on the force, by stating what force is, reviewing its effects and connecting it to the topic "Friction".
    DEVELOPMENT Step 1. Group Work (7mins) The teacher guides the learners to form four groups and ask them to choose their leaders and secretaries. Learners choose their group leaders and secretaries. Inculcating leadership skills, competitive spirit, cooperation, teamwork and a sense of responsibility among learners.
    Give each group the rough sliding and the smooth sliding surfaces to move the bottles water and container of gravel on them and state their findings. Learners perform the activity in their various groups, observe and state their findings. On the rough sliding surface, the container moves slowly and even stopped but on the smooth surface, the container moved fast. Finding how easy or hard objects can move on rough and smooth surfaces.
    Let the learners state what stopped or prevented the container from moving forward. Introduce the concept of friction. Learners explain that a force stopped the movement of the container. Developing ideas on the concept of friction and introducing the topic friction.
    The teacher asks the pupils what they think stopped the movement of the container on the rough surface. It is a kind of force that opposes or prevent movement between two surfaces in contact called friction. Write the topic on the board. Learners expected response. Learners reflect on what stops/ prevents objects from moving further. This could be called friction. Stating the meaning of friction.
    Learners are asked to say what friction is in their own words. Friction can also be defined as the rubbing of one object or surface against another. Friction is the resistance between surfaces in contact. Confirming the meaning of friction.
    Step 2 Full class session (5mins) The teacher asks the learners to state some other areas in their daily lives where friction occurs. Learners identify areas in their daily lives where friction occurs:
    • Rubbing/ Clapping our hands.
    • Pounding in a mortar.
    • Smoothening planks with carpenters tools.
    Mentioning instances of the application of friction in our daily lives.
    Step 3 Group Work(7mins) Learners are lead to roll the bottled water and the container of gravel on a smooth and rough sliding surface in their groups and state their findings. Learners observe the differences in the movement of objects on rough and smooth surfaces.
    • On a smooth surface, movement is fast, friction is less.
    • On rough surfaces movement is slow, friction is more.
    Comparing how difficult or fast movement on different surfaces can be.
    Learners are led to mention three things that can be done to reduce friction. Friction is more on sliding objects and it is less on rolling objects. Learners mention the things that can be done to reduce friction:
    • Applying lubricants such as Vaseline, Grease, Engine oil, Olive oil and drinking water.
    Identifying ways of reducing friction.
    Learners are led to apply examples of how to reduce friction to their daily lives. Learners identify other instances of how to reduce friction in our daily lives as follows:
    • The sole of a shoe on a slippery surface.
    • Oiling bicycle part and sewing machine.
    • Oiling your generation
    • Rubbing pomade on our bodies.
    Confirming the ways of reducing friction and applying it to our daily lives.
    Step 4. Full class session (6mins) The teacher guides the learners to state the advantages/ disadvantages of friction with the following questions:
    • Of what use is friction to Us?
    Learners state the advantages of friction:
    • It leads to producing good finished products.
    • It enables us to stop our vehicles while in motion.
    Stating the advantages of friction.
    What are the negative effects of friction on our daily lives? Disadvantages:
    • It causes a change in the shape of some objects.
    • Causes clothes to wear out.
    • It can cause continuous constipation if food is taken without water.
    • It can cause death.
    Identifying the disadvantages of friction.
    Evaluation. Full class session (3 mins) Ask the following questions to evaluate the achievement of the lesson. Learners expected response: Confirming the achievement of the set objectives.
    What is friction? Friction is the force that makes objects in motion stop movement.
    Mention three areas where friction occurs in your daily lives? Three areas where friction occurs in our daily lives.
    • Clapping our hands.
    • Applying bicycle brake.
    • Pounding in a mortar.
    Describe how friction can be increased or decreased? Friction can be increased by rolling objects on rough surfaces and also be reduced by applying lubricants such as grease, engine oil, olive oil and water.
    Of what use is friction to us? Advantages of friction:
    • It leads to producing good finished products.
    • It enables us to stop our vehicles when in motion.

    • Disadvantages:
    • It causes a change in the shap of some objects.
    • It causes clothes to wear out.
    • It can cause continuous constipation if food is taken without water.
    • It can cause death.
    Conclusion, full class session (3mins) Ask learners to state the ways of applying friction in their daily lives.

    Let the learners copy the answers started under learners activities as notes
    Learners expected response. Applying bicycle brake while riding.

    Learners copy the notes given into their exercise books
    Acquiring calligraphy skills.
    ASSIGNMENT
    1. Explain the use of friction in using rubber to erase a pencil mark
    2. How may friction be reduced between surfaces?
    Learners answer other questions Improving their level of understanding of Frictional force.
    Worksheet on Friction

    You are provided with the following materials: a Swan water bottle filled with water block surface, a piece of the carton as a smooth surface and a container filled with gravels.

    Carry out the following activities:

    A) Predict how hard or easy the movement will be if you use your fingertip to push the container and the swam water bottle on the different surfaces.

    B) Cayy out the activity with the materials given to find out the results of your predictions.


    Status Surface Prediction of Friction Hard/ Easy Results
    1) A container filled with gravels Block
    2) A container filled with gravel Piece of carton
    3) Swam water bottle standing (sliding) Desk
    4) Swam water bottle laying (rolling) Desk

    State reasons for the difference in friction in the above activity
    1. Compare status 1 and 2 in activity above
    2. Compare status 3 and 4 in activity above

    Lesson Note for Nursery Teachers

    Lesson Plan for Kindergarten

    Subject: Phonics

    Theme: Phonetics

    Topic: Letter Sounds

    Sub Topic: Sound of Letter /s/, /a/ and /t/

    Date: dd/mm/yyyy

    Class: Kindergarten

    Duration: 35 Minutes

    No of Learners: 20

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of the lesson learners should be able to:
    1. Differentiate between giraffe, turtle and monkey tail letters

      e.g
      1. giraffe letters = t, f , h, b, d, k, l
      2. turtle letters = a, c, e, i, m, o, r, s, u, v, w, x, z
      3. monkey tail letters = g, j, p, q, y

    2. Identify the sounds of letters /s/, /a/, /t/ in stories told and perform the action associated with it.

      e.g
      1. /s/ = weave your hand in an 'S' shape and say s, s, s, s, s.
      2. /a/ = wiggle your fingers above the elbow as if ants are crawling on you and say a, a, a, a, a.
      3. /t/ = turn your head from the side, as if you are watching tennis, and say t, t, t, t, t.

    3. Write the sound and use the actions associated with it to spell words. E.g /s/ as, at, ass, sat
    4. Using your magic writing pen and board, blend some sounds to form two and three-letter words.
    5. Sing the songs associated with the letters.

    Rationale:

    Reading is a skill that learners communicate effectively. Any learner that cannot read cannot pass any examination. It is, therefore, necessary for every pupil to be exposed to the sound of letters so that they can read fluently.

    Prerequisite/ Previous knowledge:

    Pupils have learnt how to recite the alphabet from a-z and can identify the vowel sounds.

    Learning Materials:

    Flashcards and charts (alphabet and objects.)

    Reference Materials:

    Jolly phonics pupils book 1 by Sue I Joy and Sara Wernham.

    Lesson Development:

    STAGE
    TEACHER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNER'S ACTIVITY
    LEARNING POINTS
    INTRODUCTION
    full class session (5mins)
    The teacher asks the pupils to recite the alphabet on the alphabet chart displayed before the class.


    How many vowels do we have? Mention them
    Learners recite the letter a-z on the chart


    Pupils expected response. We have five vowels. E.g.
    a, e, i, o, u.
    Revising the previous lesson and identifying the vowels sounds.
    DEVELOPMENT
    Step 1. Group Work (5mins)
    Guide the pupils to form four groups and ask them to choose their leaders and secretaries.

    Explain to the pupils how to identify giraffe letters, turtle and monkey tail letters.
    Learners form four groups and choose their leaders and secretaries. Inculcating leadership skills, boldness, competitive spirit, teamwork, and a sense of responsibility among pupils.
    Give the four groups the alphabet chart. Guide them to identify the different types of letters and vowel sounds. Let every group read out their answers consecutively. Learners expected response:-
    Giraffe letters: b, d, f, h, k, l, t.
    Turtle letters: a, c, e, i, m, n, o, r, s, u, v, x, z.
    Monkey tail letters: g, j, p, q, y.
    Vowel sounds: a, e, i, o, u.
    Finding out the differences between the giraffe, turtle and monkey tail letters/ Vowels.
    Step 2 Full class session (7mins) Tell the pupils stories and ask them to identify the letter sound that is predominant in the story. Learners identify the sound of the letter that is predominant in the story as /s/, /a/, /t/. Developing the idea of the phonics sound from the stories told.
    Flash the letters and let them make the sound. Demonstrate how to write them in the air, on their friends back, on their desk, with their whole bodies and sand trays with their magic writing pen (their fingers). Pupils demonstrate how to write the letter sounds. Pupils are allowed to ask questions. Demonstrating how to write the letters.
    Step 3 Full class session (8mins). Teachers demonstrate the actions associated with the letter sounds and asks the pupils to do the same.
    Using her magic writing board (left arm) she blends two/three-letter words for pupils to pronounce. e.g.
    /a/, /s/ = as,
    /a/, /t/ = at,
    /a/, /s/, /s/ = ass,
    /s/, /a/, /t/ = sat
    Pupils observe and emulate their teacher's actions. Blending two and three-letter sounds to form words.
    EVALUATION
    Full class session (7mins).
    Ask the following questions to evaluate the achievement of the set objectives.
    Teachers dictate the following words using arm blending and action for the pupils to write into their books. e.g.
    1. /a/ /s/ = as
    2. /a/ /t/ = at
    3. /a/ /s/ /s/ = ass
    4. /s/ /a/ /t/ = sat
    Pupil write down the words dictated into their notebooks. eg:
    /a/ /s/ =as
    /a/ /t/ = at
    /a/ /s/ /s/ = ass
    /s/ /a/ /t/ sat
    Acquiring listing skills and improving their calligraphy and reading skills.
    Conclusion, full class session (3mins) The teacher marks their papers and corrects their mistakes where necessary. teacher clarifies the areas where the pupils were confused and summarizes the lesson. Pupils make corrections where necessary. Learners improve their reading skills.
    ASSIGNMENT
    1. Identify the sounds of /s/, /a/ and /t/ in the following words
      1. bag, cat, tea, rat, bottle, see, six, sun, ask
    Pupils answer other questions. Learners improve their reading skills.

    LIST OF RECOMMENDED TEXTBOOKS for Primary 4-6

    LIST OF RECOMMENDED TEXTBOOKS FOR MIDDLE BASIC

    Basic 4-6
    Basic 4 Basic 5 Basic 6
    ENGLISH LANGUAGE
    1. Macmillan Brilliant English text/workbook (Book 4)
    2. Modular English Course for Primary School (Book 4) by S. O. Ayodele
    3. Basic Primary Phonetics for Basic 3 by Adi Cynthia Opara
    4. Grammar for Primary Schools (Book 4) by University Press
    5. Steps to Good Handwriting (Book 4) by Nkwanyuo J. E.
    ENGLISH LANGUAGE
    1. Modular English Course for Primary School (Book 5) by S.O. Ayodele et al
    2. Brighter Grammar (Book 3) by Phebean Ogundipe et al
    3. Structural English Workbook (Book 5) by Romald Ridout
    4. Spelling Book (Book 3) by John Smith
    5. The New Method English Dictionary by Michael West
    6. Active Handwriting (Book 5) by University Press
    ENGLISH LANGUAGE
    1. Showers Book English for Nigerian Primary Schools (Book 6) by Sterling
    2. Modular English Course for Primary Schools (Book 6) by S. O. Ayodele et al
    3. Mastering English by M. O. Odiaka
    4. Basic Primary Phonetics for Basic 5 by Adi Cynthia Opara
    5. English Literature: The Power of Wisdom by David Ayandipe
    6. English Literature: The Dreamer by Olajire Olanlokun
    7. The New Method English Dictionary by Michael West
    8. Nationwide Common Entrance Examinations on English Language and Verbal Aptitude Tests by Ugo C. Ugo
    9. Nationwide Vocational Aptitude Tests (General Studies, Social Studies, Current Affairs) by Ugo C. Ugo
    ENGLISH LITERATURE
    1. English Literature: The Bench Warmer by David Ayandipe
    2. English Literature: The Jolly Ride to Grandpa by Yemisi Kassim
    3. English Literature: The Legend by Olajire Olanlokun
    ENGLISH LITERATURE
    1. English Literature: Dove the Bridegroom by David Ayandipe
    2. English Literature: Dayo’s Fortune by S. O. Olatunji
    ENGLISH LITERATURE
    1. English Literature: Dove the Bridegroom by David Ayandipe
    2. English Literature: Dayo’s Fortune by S. O. Olatunji
    MATHEMATICS
    1. Understanding Mathematics (Book4) by Marian N. Daud-Osuaght
    2. Easy Way to Mathematics (Book 4) by Sterling
    MATHEMATICS
    1. Macmillan New Primary Mathematics (Book 5)
    MATHEMATICS
    1. Champion Mathematics (Book 6) by Macmillan
    2. Understanding Mathematics (Book 6) by Marian N. Daud-Osuaght
    3. Nationwide Common Entrance Examinations on Maths & Quantitative Aptitude Tests by Ugo C. Ugo
    VERBAL REASONING
    1. Verbal Reasoning by Lantern (Book 4)
    VERBAL REASONING
    1. Verbal Reasoning by Lantern (Book 5)
    2. The New Approach to Verbal Reasoning (Book 5) by Igwe I. O. et al
    VERBAL REASONING
    1. Verbal Reasoning by Lantern (Book 5)
    2. The New Approach to Verbal Reasoning (Book 6) by Igwe I. O. et al
    QUATITATIVE REASONING
    1. Quatitative Reasoning (Book 4) by Lantern
    QUATITATIVE REASONING
    1. Quatitative Reasoning (Book 5) by Lantern
    QUATITATIVE REASONING
    1. Quatitative Reasoning (Book 6) by Lantern
    2. The New Approach to Quantitative Reasoning (Book 6) by T. A. O. Olayiwola
    BASIC SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
    1. Basic Science and Technology (Book 4) by University Press
    BASIC SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
    1. Basic Science and Technology (Book 5) by Igwe I.O. et al
    BASIC SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
    1. Basic Science and Technology (Book 6) by Igwe I.O. et al
    CIVIC EDUCATION
    1. Civic Education for Primary School (Book 4) by Sterling
    CIVIC EDUCATION
    1. Civic Education for Primary School (Book 5) by Sterling
    CIVIC EDUCATION
    1. Civic Education for Primary Schools (Book 6) by Adesola Luqman et al
    COMPUTER STUDIES
    1. Easy Way to Computer (Book 4) by Sterling
    2. Foundation Computer Studies (Book 4) by E.O. Adegbeyeni
    COMPUTER STUDIES
    1. Foundation Computer Studies (Book 5) by E. O. Adegbeyemi
    COMPUTER STUDIES
    1. Easy Way to Computer (Book 6) by Sterling
    2. Foundation Computer Studies (Book 6) by E. O. Adegbeyeni
    SOCIAL STUDIES
    1. Easy Way to Social Studies (Book 4) by Sterling
    SOCIAL STUDIES
    1. Modular Primary Social Studies (Book 5) by Otite O. et al
    SOCIAL STUDIES
    1. Modular Primary Social Studies (Book 6) by Otite O. et al
    2. Basic Social Studies by Longman
    AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
    1. Pre-vocational Studies for Primary Schools (Book4) by Sterling
    2. Agicultural Science for Primary Schools (Book 4) by Aiyegbayo J. T. et al
    AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
    1. Pre-vocational Studies for Primary Schools (Book5) by Sterling
    2. Agricultural Science for Primary Schools (Book 5) by Aiyegbayo J. T. et al
    AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
    1. Modern Theory and Practice of Agricultural Science (Book 6) by Emem
    2. Agricultural Science for Primary Schools (Book 6) by Aiyegbayo J. T. et al
    CREATIVE AND CULTURAL ART
    1. Creative Composition (Book 4) by Lantern
    2. Basic Creative and Cultural Arts (Book 4) by Kolade Salami
    CREATIVE AND CULTURAL ART
    1. Basic Creative and Cultural Arts (Book 5) by Kolade Salami
    CREATIVE AND CULTURAL ART
    1. Basic Creative and Cultural Arts (Book 6) by Kolade Salami
    FRENCH
    1. Bonjour Camarade (Book 4) by Longman
    FRENCH
    1. Bonjour Camarade (Book 5) by Longman
    FRENCH
    1. Bonjour Camarade (Book 5) by Longman
    PHYSICAL & HEALTH EDUCATION
    1. Physical and Health Education for Primary Schoolls (Book 4) by West African Bool Publishers
    PHYSICAL & HEALTH EDUCATION
    1. Primary Health Education (Book 5) by Ori-Aifo et al
    PHYSICAL & HEALTH EDUCATION
    1. Primary Health Education (Book 6) by Ori-Aifo et al
    PHYSICAL & HEALTH EDUCATION
    1. Physical and Health Education for Primary Schoolls (Book 4) by West African Bool Publishers
    PHYSICAL & HEALTH EDUCATION
    1. Primary Health Education (Book 5) by Ori-Aifo et al
    PHYSICAL & HEALTH EDUCATION
    1. Primary Health Education (Book 6) by Ori-Aifo et al
    HOME ECONONICS
    1. Home Economics for Primary School (Book 4) by Ogunjinmi et al
    PHYSICAL & HEALTH EDUCATION
    1. Home Economics for Primary School (Book 5) by Ogunjinmi et al
    PHYSICAL & HEALTH EDUCATION
    1. Home Economics for Primary School (Book 6) by Ogunjinmi et al

    LIST OF RECOMMENDED TEXTBOOKS for Senior Secondary

    LIST OF RECOMMENDED TEXTBOOKS FOR SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOL

    Senior Secondary School SSS 1-3
    SSS 1 SSS 2 SSS 3
    ENGLISH LANGUAGE
    1. High Standard English for Senior Secondary Schools By Gabriel A. et al. Spectrum Publisher
    2. Advanced Learner’s Dictionary
    3. English At a Sitting. By J. O. Olanrewaju. Excellent Scholars Publisher
    4. Understanding Oral English for Schools and Colleges By Emeke Modesty
    5. Understanding English Grammar for Schools and Colleges By Obiazikwor
    6. The Guilty One By Jide Aremu. OPSAM Publisher
    7. Things Fall Apart By Chinua Achebe. AWS Publisher
    8. The First Lady By Adeoye Johnson A. JAAK - DEBSON Publisher
    ENGLISH LANGUAGE
    1. High Standard English for Senior Secondary Schools By Gabriel A. et al. Spectrum Publisher
    2. Advanced Learner’s Dictionary
    3. English At a Sitting. By J. O. Olanrewaju. Excellent Scholars Publisher
    4. Understanding Oral English for Schools and Colleges By Emeke Modesty
    5. Understanding English Grammar for Schools and Colleges By Obiazikwor
    6. Animal Farm By George Orwell
    7. Nervous Conditions By Tsitsi Dangarembga
    8. Jane Eyre
    ENGLISH LANGUAGE
    1. New Oxford Secondary English Course By Ayo Banjo et al. UPL Publisher
    2. Advanced Learner’s Dictionary
    3. English At a Sitting By J. O. Olanrewaju. Excellent Scholars Publisher
    4. JAMB Text
    5. Exam Focus for Senior Secondary By Ayo Banjo
    6. Understanding Oral English for Schools and Colleges By Emeke Modesty
    7. Understanding Oral English for Schools and Colleges By Obiazikwor
    LITERATURE IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE
    1. Unexpected Joy at Dawn by Alex Agyiri
    2. Second Class Citizen by Buchi Emecheta
    3. Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
    4. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
    5. Let Me Die Alone by John K. Klargo
    6. The Lion and the Jewel by Wole Soyinka
    7. Look Back in Anger by John Osborne
    8. Fences by August Wilson
    9. A Midsummer Night’s Dream by Shakespeare
    10. Exam Focus for Literature UPL Publisher
    LITERATURE IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE
    1. Unexpected Joy at Dawn by Alex Agyiri
    2. Second Class Citizen by Buchi Emecheta
    3. Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
    4. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
    5. Let Me Die Alone by John K. Klargo
    6. The Lion and the Jewel by Wole Soyinka
    7. Look Back in Anger by John Osborne
    8. Fences by August Wilson
    9. A Midsummer Night’s Dream by Shakespeare
    10. Exam Focus for Literature UPL Publisher
    LITERATURE IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE
    1. Unexpected Joy at Dawn by Alex Agyiri
    2. Second Class Citizen by Buchi Emecheta
    3. Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
    4. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
    5. Let Me Die Alone by John K. Klargo
    6. The Lion and the Jewel by Wole Soyinka
    7. Look Back in Anger by John Osborne
    8. Fences by August Wilson
    9. A Midsummer Night’s Dream by Shakespeare
    10. Exam Focus for Literature UPL Publisher
    MATHEMATICS
    1. New General Mathematics 1
    2. New Senior Secondary Mathematics 1 Bounty Press Ltd Publisher
    3. Extension Modern Mathematics For Senior Secondary School 1 Extension Publication Ltd
    4. Hidden Facts in SSCE Mathematics By M. A. Otumudia
    5. War Against Failure in Mathematics By Hon. Azeez Bunyanmin Adesin
    MATHEMATICS
    1. New General Mathematics 2
    2. New Senior Secondary Mathematics 2 Bounty Press Ltd Publisher
    3. Extension Modern Mathematics For Senior Secondary School 2 Extension Publication Ltd
    4. Hidden Facts in SSCE Mathematics By M. A. Otumudia
    5. War Against Failure in Mathematics By Hon. Azeez Bunyanmin Adesin
    MATHEMATICS
    1. New General Mathematics 3
    2. New Senior Secondary Mathematics 3 Bounty Press Ltd Publisher
    3. Extension Modern Mathematics For Senior Secondary School 3 Extension Publication Ltd
    4. Hidden Facts in SSCE Mathematics By M. A. Otumudia
    5. War Against Failure in Mathematics By Hon. Azeez Bunyanmin Adesin
    FURTHER MATHEMATICS
    1. Further Mathematics Project 1
    2. Past Questions and Answers on Further Mathematics By F. O. Oluwatope & Y. Akintunde
    3. Additional Mathematics By Godman et al
    FURTHER MATHEMATICS
    1. Further Mathematics Project 2
    2. Past Questions and Answers on Further Mathematics By F. O. Oluwatope & Y. Akintunde
    3. Additional Mathematics By Godman et al
    FURTHER MATHEMATICS
    1. Further Mathematics Project 3
    2. Past Questions and Answers on Further Mathematics By F. O. Oluwatope & Y. Akintunde
    3. Additional Mathematics By Godman et al
    VISUAL ARTS
    1. Integrated Visual Arts for Senior Secondary Schools by Bayo Okunlola et al. Bounty Press Ltd Publishers
    2. Certificate Art Junior and Senior Secondary Schools By UPL Publishers
    3. Certificate Art for Junior and Senior Secondary Schools
    VISUAL ARTS
    1. Integrated Visual Arts for Senior Secondary Schools by Bayo Okunlola et al. Bounty Press Ltd Publishers
    2. Certificate Art Junior and Senior Secondary Schools By UPL Publishers
    3. Certificate Art for Junior and Senior Secondary Schools
    VISUAL ARTS
    1. Integrated Visual Arts for Senior Secondary Schools by Bayo Okunlola et al. Bounty Press Ltd Publishers
    2. Certificate Art Junior and Senior Secondary Schools By UPL Publishers
    3. Certificate Art for Junior and Senior Secondary Schools
    ART MATERIALS
    1. 2B Pencils
    2. Poster Colour
    3. Sable brushes
    4. A packet of pencil colour
    5. A Packet of felt tips
    6. Colour Pencils (packet)
    7. Palette (Medium or small size)
    8. A3 tracing paper
    9. A3 Sketch Pad
    10. Sets of B pencils 2B, 3B, 4B, 5B
    11. Charcoal or charcoal pencil
    12. A set of calligraphy pen
    13. Ink
    14. Drawing instruments / Maths Set
    15. Set Squares
    16. Standand Drawing Board with T-square
    ART MATERIALS
    1. 2B Pencils
    2. Poster Colour
    3. Sable brushes
    4. A packet of pencil colour
    5. A Packet of felt tips
    6. Colour Pencils (packet)
    7. Palette (Medium or small size)
    8. A3 tracing paper
    9. A3 Sketch Pad
    10. Sets of B pencils 2B, 3B, 4B, 5B
    11. Charcoal or charcoal pencil
    12. A set of calligraphy pen
    13. Ink
    14. Drawing instruments / Maths Set
    15. Standand Drawing Board with T-square
    ART MATERIALS
    1. 2B Pencils
    2. Poster Colour
    3. Sable brushes
    4. A packet of pencil colour
    5. A Packet of felt tips
    6. Colour Pencils (packet)
    7. Palette (Medium or small size)
    8. A3 tracing paper
    9. A3 Sketch Pad
    10. Sets of B pencils 2B, 3B, 4B, 5B
    11. Charcoal or charcoal pencil
    12. A set of calligraphy pen
    13. Ink
    14. Drawing instruments / Maths Set
    15. Standand Drawing Board with T-square
    HISTORY
    1. Africa and the Wider World by Oladele Odanye
    2. A Handbook of History for Senior Secondary Schools, History of Nigeria by Oladele Odanye
    HISTORY
    1. Africa and the Wider World by Oladele Odanye
    2. A Handbook of History for Senior Secondary Schools, History of Nigeria by Oladele Odanye
    HISTORY
    1. Africa and the Wider World by Oladele Odanye
    2. A Handbook of History for Senior Secondary Schools, History of Nigeria by Oladele Odanye
    MUSIC
    1. Spectrum Music for Schools Book 1 – 3 by Amorele Inanga et al. Spectrum Publisher
    2. Music Manuscript
    MUSIC
    1. Spectrum Music for Schools Book 1 – 3 by Amorele Inanga et al. Spectrum Publisher
    2. Music Manuscript
    MUSIC
    1. Spectrum Music for Schools Book 1 – 3 by Amorele Inanga et al. Spectrum Publisher
    2. Music Manuscript
    FRENCH
    1. C’est ici ! Methode de Francais 4 by Eric Kana / Vycky Merveille. Learning Solution Publisher
    2. A Concise Course in French by Tunde Ayeleru. Resource Francophone Publisher
    FRENCH
    1. C’est ici ! Methode de Francais 4 by Eric Kana / Vycky Merveille. Learning Solution Publisher
    2. A Concise Course in French by Tunde Ayeleru. Resource Francophone Publisher
    FRENCH
    1. C’est ici ! Methode de Francais 4 by Eric Kana / Vycky Merveille. Learning Solution Publisher
    2. A Concise Course in French by Tunde Ayeleru. Resource Francophone Publisher
    CHRISTIAN RELIGIOUS KNOWLEDGE
    1. Simple Approach to Christian Religious Knowledge for Senior Secondary Schools by Joshua Owolabi
    2. The Holy Bible (RSV)
    CHRISTIAN RELIGIOUS KNOWLEDGE
    1. Simple Approach to Christian Religious Knowledge for Senior Secondary Schools by Joshua Owolabi
    2. The Holy Bible (RSV)
    CHRISTIAN RELIGIOUS KNOWLEDGE
    1. Simple Approach to Christian Religious Knowledge for Senior Secondary Schools by Joshua Owolabi
    2. The Holy Bible (RSV)
    FOOD AND NUTRITION
    1. Basic Foods and Nutrition for Senior Secondary Schools 1 by S. N. Aminu Barik
    2. Exam Focus for SS 1 Foods and Nutrition for Senior Secondary Schools by J. O. Olusanya & Co. University Press PLC
    FOOD AND NUTRITION
    1. Basic Foods and Nutrition for Senior Secondary Schools 2 by S. N. Aminu Barik
    2. Exam Focus for SS 2 Foods and Nutrition for Senior Secondary Schools by J. O. Olusanya & Co. University Press PLC
    FOOD AND NUTRITION
    1. Basic Foods and Nutrition for Senior Secondary Schools 3 by S. N. Aminu Barik
    2. Exam Focus for SS 3 Foods and Nutrition for Senior Secondary Schools by J. O. Olusanya & Co. University Press PLC
    AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
    1. Essential Agricultural Science for Senior Secondary Schools by O. A. Iwena. TONAD Publisher Ltd
    AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
    1. Essential Agricultural Science for Senior Secondary Schools by O. A. Iwena. TONAD Publisher Ltd
    AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
    1. Essential Agricultural Science for Senior Secondary Schools by O. A. Iwena. TONAD Publisher Ltd
    ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
    1. Integrated Animal Husbandry for Schools and Colleges by Babayemi et al. Positive Press Publisher
    ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
    1. Integrated Animal Husbandry for Schools and Colleges by Babayemi et al. Positive Press Publisher
    ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
    1. Integrated Animal Husbandry for Schools and Colleges by Babayemi et al. Positive Press Publisher
    COMPUTER STUDIES
    1. Evans Computer Science for Senior Secondary Schools Book 1
    COMPUTER STUDIES
    1. Evans Computer Science for Senior Secondary Schools Book 2
    COMPUTER STUDIES
    1. Evans Computer Science for Senior Secondary Schools Book 3
    DATA PROCESSING
    1. Data Processing for Senior Secondary Schools Book 1 By Wole Olatokun, Adegoke Olatunde, Stanley Emeka & Bala Ibrahim. HEBN Publishers Plc
    DATA PROCESSING
    1. Data Processing for Senior Secondary Schools Book 2 By Wole Olatokun, Adegoke Olatunde, Stanley Emeka & Bala Ibrahim. HEBN Publishers Plc
    DATA PROCESSING
    1. Data Processing for Senior Secondary Schools Book 3 By Wole Olatokun, Adegoke Olatunde, Stanley Emeka & Bala Ibrahim. HEBN Publishers Plc
    PHYSIC
    1. Today’s Physics for Senior Secondary Schools and Colleges (Main Text) by T. O. Oyelade
    2. Excellent Physics Laboratory Workbook for Senior Secondary Schools (Practical) by S.M. Adigun
    PHYSIC
    1. Today’s Physics for Senior Secondary Schools and Colleges (Main Text) by T. O. Oyelade
    2. Excellent Physics Laboratory Workbook for Senior Secondary Schools (Practical) by S.M. Adigun
    PHYSIC
    1. Today’s Physics for Senior Secondary Schools and Colleges (Main Text) by T. O. Oyelade
    2. Excellent Physics Laboratory Workbook for Senior Secondary Schools (Practical) by S.M. Adigun
    TECHNICAL DRAWING
    1. Basic Technical Construction Methods by Yode-Owolade A.O.
    2. Technical Drawing for Schools and Colleges by J. N. Green. Spectrum Publisher
    TECHNICAL DRAWING
    1. Basic Technical Construction Methods by Yode-Owolade A.O.
    2. Technical Drawing for Schools and Colleges by J. N. Green. Spectrum Publisher
    TECHNICAL DRAWING
    1. Basic Technical Construction Methods by Yode-Owolade A.O.
    2. Technical Drawing for Schools and Colleges by J. N. Green. Spectrum Publisher
    CHEMISTRY
    1. Understanding Chemistry for Schools and Colleges (Main Texts) by Godwin O. Ojokuku. Press on Chem Resources Publisher
    2. Outline Chemistry for Schools and Colleges (Calculations) by Ojiodu, C.C. New Wave Publishers Publisher
    3. Exposure Chemistry Practical textbook and Workbook Manual (Practical) by Ogunleye I. O.
    CHEMISTRY
    1. Understanding Chemistry for Schools and Colleges (Main Texts) by Godwin O. Ojokuku. Press on Chem Resources Publisher
    2. Outline Chemistry for Schools and Colleges (Calculations) by Ojiodu, C.C. New Wave Publishers Publisher
    3. Exposure Chemistry Practical textbook and Workbook Manual (Practical) by Ogunleye I. O.
    CHEMISTRY
    1. Understanding Chemistry for Schools and Colleges (Main Texts) by Godwin O. Ojokuku. Press on Chem Resources Publisher
    2. Outline Chemistry for Schools and Colleges (Calculations) by Ojiodu, C.C. New Wave Publishers Publisher
    3. Exposure Chemistry Practical textbook and Workbook Manual (Practical) by Ogunleye I. O.
    BIOLOGY
    1. Modern Biology for Senior Secondary Schools by Sarojini T. Ramalingam. Africana First Publishers
    2. Senior Secondary Certificate Practical Biology by S. O. Iloeje. Learn Africa Plc Publishers
    BIOLOGY
    1. Modern Biology for Senior Secondary Schools by Sarojini T. Ramalingam. Africana First Publishers
    2. Senior Secondary Certificate Practical Biology by S. O. Iloeje. Learn Africa Plc Publishers
    BIOLOGY
    1. Modern Biology for Senior Secondary Schools by Sarojini T. Ramalingam. Africana First Publishers
    2. Senior Secondary Certificate Practical Biology by S. O. Iloeje. Learn Africa Plc Publishers
    ECONOMICS
    1. Fundamentals of Economics for Senior Secondary Schools by R. A. I. Anyawuocha African Publishers
    2. Exam Focus Economics for WASSCE and SSCE by A A. Aderinto et al. University Press
    ECONOMICS
    1. Fundamentals of Economics for Senior Secondary Schools by R. A. I. Anyawuocha African Publishers
    2. Exam Focus Economics for WASSCE and SSCE by A A. Aderinto et al. University Press
    ECONOMICS
    1. Fundamentals of Economics for Senior Secondary Schools by R. A. I. Anyawuocha African Publishers
    2. Exam Focus Economics for WASSCE and SSCE by A A. Aderinto et al. University Press
    CIVIC EDUCATION
    1. FAMA Civic Education for Senior Secondary Schools by Oladele Odanye
    CIVIC EDUCATION
    1. FAMA Civic Education for Senior Secondary Schools by Oladele Odanye
    CIVIC EDUCATION
    1. FAMA Civic Education for Senior Secondary Schools by Oladele Odanye
    GOVERNMENT
    1. Concise Government for Senior Secondary Schools (Fourth Edition) by Akin Adegbola, Tola Atolagbe & Olayiwola Owolabi Hope Publications
    GOVERNMENT
    1. Concise Government for Senior Secondary Schools (Fourth Edition) by Akin Adegbola, Tola Atolagbe & Olayiwola Owolabi Hope Publications
    GOVERNMENT
    1. Concise Government for Senior Secondary Schools (Fourth Edition) by Akin Adegbola, Tola Atolagbe & Olayiwola Owolabi Hope Publications
    COMMERCE
    1. Faman Commerce for Senior Schools Book 1 by Bayo Fijabi. Faman Publisher
    COMMERCE
    1. Faman Commerce for Senior Schools Book 2 by Bayo Fijabi. Faman Publisher
    COMMERCE
    1. Faman Commerce for Senior Schools Book 3 by Bayo Fijabi. Faman Publisher
    MARKETING
    1. Marketing for Senior Secondary Schools Book 1 by Bayo Fijabi. Faman Publisher
    MARKETING
    1. Marketing for Senior Secondary Schools Book 2 by Bayo Fijabi. Faman Publisher
    MARKETING
    1. Marketing for Senior Secondary Schools Book 3 by Bayo Fijabi. Faman Publisher
    FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING
    1. Simplified and Amplified Financial Accounting Book 1 by A.O. Longe. Tonad Publishers
    FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING
    1. Simplified and Amplified Financial Accounting Book 1 by A.O. Longe. Tonad Publishers
    FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING
    1. Simplified and Amplified Financial Accounting Book 1 by A.O. Longe. Tonad Publishers
    GEOGRAPHY
    1. Senior Secondary Geography by S.A. Emielu. Geographical Bureau Nig. Ltd Publisher
    GEOGRAPHY
    1. Senior Secondary Geography by S.A. Emielu. Geographical Bureau Nig. Ltd Publisher
    GEOGRAPHY
    1. Senior Secondary Geography by S.A. Emielu. Geographical Bureau Nig. Ltd Publisher
    YORUBA LANGUAGE
    1. WAEC/NECO LITERATURE TEXTS YORUBA LITERATURE TEXTS (2021 – 2025)
    2. ORAL LITERATURE
      1. DRAMA: Ege Dida By S.M. RAJI. Extension Publishers
      2. AKOJOPO ALO IJAPA APA KIN-IN-NI By Adeboye Babalola. UP Plc
      3. POETRY: Awon Oriki Orile Metadinlogun By Adeboye Babalola. Longman Nig. Plc
    3. WRITTEN LITERATURE
      1. Prose: Moremi Ajasoro By Debo Awe. Elyon Pub. Ilesa
      2. Drama: Nitori Owo By Akinwumi Isola. Sumob Pub. Osogbo
      3. Poetry: Oro Enu Akewi By Ayomide Akanji. Genius Books Publications
    4. MAIN TEXTBOOKS
      1. Eko Ede Yoruba Titun SS1 By Oyebamiji Mus et al. UPL Plc. Temaja Prints
      2. Igbagbo, Asa ati Litireso Yoruba
      3. Iwe Ede Iperi Yoruba Vol. II By UPL. NERDC Publisher
    YORUBA LANGUAGE
    1. WAEC/NECO LITERATURE TEXTS YORUBA LITERATURE TEXTS (2021 – 2025)
    2. ORAL LITERATURE
      1. DRAMA: Ege Dida By S.M. RAJI. Extension Publishers
      2. AKOJOPO ALO IJAPA APA KIN-IN-NI By Adeboye Babalola. UP Plc
      3. POETRY: Awon Oriki Orile Metadinlogun By Adeboye Babalola. Longman Nig. Plc
    3. WRITTEN LITERATURE
      1. Prose: Moremi Ajasoro By Debo Awe. Elyon Pub. Ilesa
      2. Drama: Nitori Owo By Akinwumi Isola. Sumob Pub. Osogbo
      3. Poetry: Oro Enu Akewi By Ayomide Akanji. Genius Books Publications
    4. MAIN TEXTBOOKS
      1. Eko Ede Yoruba Titun SS2 By Oyebamiji Mus et al. UPL Plc. Temaja Prints
      2. Igbagbo, Asa ati Litireso Yoruba
      3. Iwe Ede Iperi Yoruba Vol. II By UPL. NERDC Publisher
    YORUBA LANGUAGE
    1. WAEC/NECO LITERATURE TEXTS YORUBA LITERATURE TEXTS (2021 – 2025)
    2. ORAL LITERATURE
      1. DRAMA: Ege Dida By S.M. RAJI. Extension Publishers
      2. AKOJOPO ALO IJAPA APA KIN-IN-NI By Adeboye Babalola. UP Plc
      3. POETRY: Awon Oriki Orile Metadinlogun By Adeboye Babalola. Longman Nig. Plc
    3. WRITTEN LITERATURE
      1. Prose: Moremi Ajasoro By Debo Awe. Elyon Pub. Ilesa
      2. Drama: Nitori Owo By Akinwumi Isola. Sumob Pub. Osogbo
      3. Poetry: Oro Enu Akewi By Ayomide Akanji. Genius Books Publications
    4. MAIN TEXTBOOKS
      1. Eko Ede Yoruba Titun SS3 By Oyebamiji Mus et al. UPL Plc. Temaja Prints
      2. Igbagbo, Asa ati Litireso Yoruba
      3. Iwe Ede Iperi Yoruba Vol. II By UPL. NERDC Publisher
    IGBO LANGUAGE
    1. Igbo Maka Senio Sekondiri (Opa Bezik) SS1 by E. Nolue Emenanjo et al. University Press Plc. Publisher
    2. NOVEL LITERATURE TEXT
      1. Nke M Ji Ka By G.I. Nwozuzu
      2. Okpa Aku Eri Eri By Ude Odiliora
      3. Akuko Ifo Ala Anyi By I.U. Nwadike
    IGBO LANGUAGE
    1. Igbo Maka Senio Sekondiri (Opa Bezik) SS2 by E. Nolue Emenanjo et al. University Press Plc. Publisher
    2. NOVEL LITERATURE TEXT
      1. Nke M Ji Ka By G.I. Nwozuzu
      2. Okpa Aku Eri Eri By Ude Odiliora
      3. Akuko Ifo Ala Anyi By I.U. Nwadike
    IGBO LANGUAGE
    1. Igbo Maka Senio Sekondiri (Opa Bezik) SS3 by E. Nolue Emenanjo et al. University Press Plc. Publisher
    2. NOVEL LITERATURE TEXT
      1. Nke M Ji Ka By G.I. Nwozuzu
      2. Okpa Aku Eri Eri By Ude Odiliora
      3. Akuko Ifo Ala Anyi By I.U. Nwadike
      4. Exam Focus Maka Igbo / Igbo Exam Focus
    HAUSA LANGUAGE
    1. Sound System and Grammar. UPL Plc Publisher
    2. Bayuwar Hausawa. Nelson, Lago
    3. Wakokin Hausa. NNPC, Zaria
    4. Wasannin Tashe. NNPC, Zaria
    HAUSA LANGUAGE
    1. Sound System and Grammar. UPL Plc Publisher
    2. Bayuwar Hausawa. Nelson, Lago
    3. Wakokin Hausa. NNPC, Zaria
    4. Wasannin Tashe. NNPC, Zaria
    HAUSA LANGUAGE
    1. Sound System and Grammar. UPL Plc Publisher
    2. Bayuwar Hausawa. Nelson, Lago
    3. Wakokin Hausa. NNPC, Zaria
    4. Wasannin Tashe. NNPC, Zaria
    ISLAMIC STUDIES
    1. Islamic Studies for Senior Secondary Schools Book 1 by Aisha B. Lemu. UP Plc Publisher
    ISLAMIC STUDIES
    1. Islamic Studies for Senior Secondary Schools Book 2 by Aisha B. Lemu. UP Plc Publisher
    ISLAMIC STUDIES
    1. Islamic Studies for Senior Secondary Schools Book 3 by Aisha B. Lemu. UP Plc Publisher

    LIST OF RECOMMENDED TEXTBOOKS for Junior Secondary

    LIST OF RECOMMENDED TEXTBOOKS FOR UPPER BASIC

    Junior Secondary School JSS 1-3
    JSS 1 JSS 2 JSS 3
    ENGLISH LANGUAGE
    1. Intensive English for JSS 1 By B.O.A Aluikpe
    2. Brigther grammer book 1
    3. Mastering English By Etal
    4. New Oxford Secondary English Course JSS 1 By Ayo Banjo. UPL Publisher
    5. New oxford Dictionary By Odiaka
    6. Oxford Advance Learner’s Dictionar
    7. English At a Sitting By J. O. Olanrewaju. Excellent Scholars Publisher
    8. Exam Focus for Junior Secondary (MAIN) By Bolaji Aremo et al.
    9. Understanding English Grammar for Schools and Colleges By Emeka Modesty Obiazikwor
    10. The English Oracle: A Guide to Phonics and Spoken English By Opeyemi Adegbosin. Baptist Press
    ENGLISH LANGUAGE
    1. Intensive English for JSS 2 By B.O.A Aluikpe
    2. Brigther grammer book 2
    3. Mastering English By Etal
    4. New Oxford Secondary English Course JSS 2 By Ayo Banjo. UPL Publisher
    5. New oxford Dictionary By Odiaka
    6. Oxford Advance Learner’s Dictionar
    7. English At a Sitting By J. O. Olanrewaju. Excellent Scholars Publisher
    8. Exam Focus for Junior Secondary (MAIN) By Bolaji Aremo et al.
    9. Understanding English Grammar for Schools and Colleges By Emeka Modesty Obiazikwor
    10. The English Oracle: A Guide to Phonics and Spoken English By Opeyemi Adegbosin. Baptist Press
    ENGLISH LANGUAGE
    1. Intensive English for JSS 3 By B.O.A Aluikpe
    2. Brigther grammer book 3
    3. Mastering English By Etal
    4. New Oxford Secondary English Course JSS 3 By Ayo Banjo. UPL Publisher
    5. New oxford Dictionary By Odiaka
    6. Oxford Advance Learner’s Dictionar
    7. English At a Sitting By J. O. Olanrewaju. Excellent Scholars Publisher
    8. Exam Focus for Junior Secondary (MAIN) By Bolaji Aremo et al.
    9. Understanding English Grammar for Schools and Colleges By Emeka Modesty Obiazikwor
    10. The English Oracle: A Guide to Phonics and Spoken English By Opeyemi Adegbosin. Baptist Press
    LITERATURE IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE
    1. The Saint by Tade Adegbindun
    2. Vengeance of the Spirit by Maxwell O. Onyeka
    3. The Rejected Child by Tina Bogwu
    4. The Costly Mistake by Chinelo Ifezulike
    5. Ogadimma! The Diary of Housemaid by Chigbo Ugwuoke
    6. The Ivory Girl by Abiola Emmanuel
    7. On the Wings of Travail by Emeka Ezema
    8. The Longest Story by Christianah
    9. Save the African Womb by Nicole Chinelo
    10. NECO Highest Grades by Christianah Uyanne
    LITERATURE IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE
    1. The Saint by Tade Adegbindun
    2. Vengeance of the Spirit by Maxwell O. Onyeka
    3. The Rejected Child by Tina Bogwu
    4. The Costly Mistake by Chinelo Ifezulike
    5. Ogadimma! The Diary of Housemaid by Chigbo Ugwuoke
    6. The Ivory Girl by Abiola Emmanuel
    7. On the Wings of Travail by Emeka Ezema
    8. The Longest Story by Christianah
    9. Save the African Womb by Nicole Chinelo
    10. NECO Highest Grades by Christianah Uyanne
    LITERATURE IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE
    1. The Saint by Tade Adegbindun
    2. Vengeance of the Spirit by Maxwell O. Onyeka
    3. The Rejected Child by Tina Bogwu
    4. The Costly Mistake by Chinelo Ifezulike
    5. Ogadimma! The Diary of Housemaid by Chigbo Ugwuoke
    6. Save the African Womb by Nicole Chinelo
    7. NECO Highest Grades by Christianah Uyanne
    MATHEMATICS
    1. New general mathematics for West Africa for JSS 1 by Channon Smith, Head Etal
    2. New General Mathematics for Junior Secondary Schools Books 1 by Pearson
    3. (Supplementary) WABP Essential Mathematics for Junior Secondary Schools by A.J. S. Oluwasanmi. Longman Nig. Plc Publisher
    4. Past Questions and Answer on Junior School Certificate Examinatio by Compiled by: Mathematics Unit The International School, U. I. Ibadan
    5. Metamorphic Maths Dictionary for Junior Secondary Schools. Metamorphic Books Services
    MATHEMATICS
    1. New general mathematics for West Africa for JSS 2 by Channon Smith, Head Etal
    2. New General Mathematics for Junior Secondary Schools Books 2 by Pearson
    3. (Supplementary) WABP Essential Mathematics for Junior Secondary Schools by A.J. S. Oluwasanmi. Longman Nig. Plc Publisher
    4. Past Questions and Answer on Junior School Certificate Examinatio by Compiled by: Mathematics Unit The International School, U. I. Ibadan
    5. Metamorphic Maths Dictionary for Junior Secondary Schools. Metamorphic Books Services
    MATHEMATICS
    1. New general mathematics for West Africa for JSS 3 by Channon Smith, Head Etal
    2. New General Mathematics for Junior Secondary Schools Books 3 by Pearson
    3. (Supplementary) WABP Essential Mathematics for Junior Secondary Schools by A.J. S. Oluwasanmi. Longman Nig. Plc Publisher
    4. Past Questions and Answer on Junior School Certificate Examinatio by Compiled by: Mathematics Unit The International School, U. I. Ibadan
    5. Metamorphic Maths Dictionary for Junior Secondary Schools. Metamorphic Books Services
    COMPUTER STUDIES
    1. Excellent Computer Studies for Junior Secondary Schools Book 1 by Adegoke Olatunde. Joytal Printing Press, Ibadan
    COMPUTER STUDIES
    1. Excellent Computer Studies for Junior Secondary Schools Book 1 by Adegoke Olatunde. Joytal Printing Press, Ibadan
    COMPUTER STUDIES
    1. Excellent Computer Studies for Junior Secondary Schools Book 1 by Adegoke Olatunde. Joytal Printing Press, Ibadan
    CIVIC EDUCATION
    1. Basic Concepts of Civic and Security Education for JSS 1 in Nigeria by Oladela Odanye. Holad Publishers
    CIVIC EDUCATION
    1. Basic Concepts of Civic and Security Education for JSS 2 in Nigeria by Oladela Odanye. Holad Publishers
    CIVIC EDUCATION
    1. Basic Concepts of Civic and Security Education for JSS 3 in Nigeria by Oladela Odanye. Holad Publishers
    FRENCH
    1. Trans-Afrique bk 1 By Macmillan
    2. C’est ici! Methode de Francais By Eric Kanal. Learning Solutions Publisher
    3. Le Devoir By Chukwura Anne. Alpha Jean Pierre Publisher
    4. Collins Easy Learning French Study Dictionary By Collins. Learning Solutions Publisher
    5. Collins Gen. French Dictionary By Macmillan.
    FRENCH
    1. On Y Va! JSS 2 By Catherine Mazuaric et al. Spectrum Publisher
    2. Le Devoir By Chukwura Anne. Alpha Jean Pierre Publisher
    3. Trans-Afrique bk 2 By Macmillan
    4. Collins Gen. French Dictionary By Macmillan.
    FRENCH
    1. On Y Va! JSS 3 By Catherine Mazuaric et al. Spectrum Publisher
    2. Trans-Afrique bk 3 By Macmillan
    3. Collins Gen. French Dictionary By Macmillan.
    4. Collins Easy Learning French Grammar By Collins. Learning Solutions Publisher
    5. Collins Easy Learning French Study Dictionary By Collins. Learning Solutions Publisher
    BASIC TECHNOLOGY
    1. Basic Technology Book 1 by R. Abu & O. A. Adeoye. Nelson Publisher
    BASIC TECHNOLOGY
    1. Basic Technology Book 2 by R. Abu & O. A. Adeoye. Nelson Publisher
    BASIC TECHNOLOGY
    1. Basic Technology Book 3 by R. Abu & O. A. Adeoye. Nelson Publisher
    BASIC SCIENCE
    1. Comprehensive Basic Science for Junior Secondary School 1 by Ojo, Olaleye, Olusoji Adetunji. Printing Press, Oyo Publisher
    BASIC SCIENCE
    1. Comprehensive Basic Science for Junior Secondary School 2 by Ojo, Olaleye, Olusoji Adetunji. Printing Press, Oyo Publisher
    BASIC SCIENCE
    1. Comprehensive Basic Science for Junior Secondary School 3 by Ojo, Olaleye, Olusoji Adetunji. Printing Press, Oyo Publisher
    BUSINESS STUDIES
    1. Business studies JSS 1 by NERDC
    2. Fundamental Business Studies for JSS 1 by F.E. Offor. B-Wright Integrated Limited
    BUSINESS STUDIES
    1. Business studies JSS 2 by NERDC
    2. Fundamental Business Studies for JSS 2 by F.E. Offor. B-Wright Integrated Limited
    BUSINESS STUDIES
    1. Business studies JSS 3 by NERDC
    2. Faman Business Studies for Junior Secondary Schools by Faman. Faman Publisher
    AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
    1. Prescribed Agric for Junior secondary schools by S.A Omoruyi, xii Orhue
    2. Pre-Vocational Studies for Junior Secondary Schools Book 1 (Agricultural Science) by Obayemi T.O. & Olugbodi F.T. Royal Publications
    3. Nelson Pre-Vocational Studies Agricultural Science for Junior Secondary Schools; Book 1 by Omolaye A. A.; Afolabi I. A. & Nnopuechi G. N. Nelson Publishers Ltd.
    AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
    1. Prescribed Agric for Junior secondary schools by S.A Omoruyi, xii Orhue
    2. Agricultural Science for Junior Secondary Schools Book 2 by Komolafe A. A. et al. Evans Publishers Ltd
    3. Pre-Vocational Studies for Junior Secondary Schools Book 2 (Agricultural Science) by Obayemi T.O. & Olugbodi F.T. Royal Publications
    AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
    1. Prescribed Agric for Junior secondary schools by S.A Omoruyi, xii Orhue
    2. Pre-Vocational Studies for Junior Secondary Schools Book 3 (Agricultural Science) by Obayemi T.O. & Olugbodi F.T. Royal Publications
    3. Seagroove Pre-Vocational Studies Agricultural Science for Junior Secondary Schools Book 3 by Emmanuel O. Onazi et al. Seagroove Publishers Ltd.
    HOME ECONOMICS
    1. Home economics for Nigeria secondary schools book 1 by Elizabeth
    2. Evans Home Economics for Junior Secondary Schools by Fadoju J, Bakare A. & Co. Evans Brothers Nig Publishers Ltd
    HOME ECONOMICS
    1. Home economics for Nigeria secondary schools book 2 by Elizabeth
    2. Evans Home Economics for Junior Secondary Schools by Fadoju J, Bakare A. & Co. Evans Brothers Nig Publishers Ltd
    HOME ECONOMICS
    1. Home economics for Nigeria secondary schools book 3 by Elizabeth
    2. Strive for Excellence in Home Economics for Junior Secondary Schools 3 (Pre-Vocational Studies Curriculum) by Marion T. Ogi-Olu
    FINE ARTS
    1. Understanding Art in general education.by Uzoagba
    2. Arts textbook for JSS. by Adhekoyibo
    3. 6-3-3-4. ArtS for schools.by S.A Mukoro
    FINE ARTS
    1. Understanding Art in general education.by Uzoagba
    2. Arts textbook for JSS. by Adhekoyibo
    3. 6-3-3-4. ArtS for schools.by S.A Mukoro
    FINE ARTS
    1. Understanding Art in general education.by Uzoagba
    2. Arts textbook for JSS. by Adhekoyibo
    3. 6-3-3-4. ArtS for schools.by S.A Mukoro
    VISUAL ARTS
    1. Creative Arts, Crafts, Custom and Traditions in Nigeria Basic 7. by Bayo Okunlola et al. Sea Publishers
    VISUAL ARTS
    1. Creative Arts, Crafts, Custom and Traditions in Nigeria Basic 8. by Bayo Okunlola et al. Sea Publishers
    VISUAL ARTS
    1. Creative Arts, Crafts, Custom and Traditions in Nigeria Basic 9. by Bayo Okunlola et al. Sea Publishers
    2. CCA Examination Data Bank by Bayo Okunlola et al. Sea Publishers
    ART MATERIALS
    1. 2B Pencils
    2. Poster Colour
    3. Sable brushes
    4. A packet of pencil colour
    5. A Packet of felt tips
    6. Colour Pencils (packet)
    7. Palette (Medium or small size)
    8. A4 size sketch pad or drawing book
    9. Maths Set
    10. Set Squares
    11. Standand Drawing Board with T-square
    ART MATERIALS
    1. 2B Pencils
    2. Poster Colour
    3. Sable brushes
    4. A packet of pencil colour
    5. A Packet of felt tips
    6. Colour Pencils (packet)
    7. Palette (Medium or small size)
    8. A4 size sketch pad or drawing book
    9. Maths Set
    10. Set Squares
    11. Standand Drawing Board with T-square
    ART MATERIALS
    1. 2B Pencils
    2. Poster Colour
    3. Sable brushes
    4. A packet of pencil colour
    5. A Packet of felt tips
    6. Colour Pencils (packet)
    7. Palette (Medium or small size)
    8. A4 size sketch pad or drawing book
    9. Maths Set
    10. Set Squares
    11. Standand Drawing Board with T-square
    MUSIC
    1. Cultural and Creative Arts book 1. by T. Sola, Ayodele, Rasheed I., Bello, G. Talabi & I Fasunha. Beulah Books Publisher
    2. Understanding music book 1. by Mensah
    3. International music and workbook. by Mensah
    MUSIC
    1. Comprehensive Music for Schools book 2. by T. Sola Ayodele et al. Beulah Books Publisher
    2. Understanding music book 2. by Mensah
    3. International music and workbook. by Mensah
    MUSIC
    1. Cultural and Creative Arts book 3. by T. Sola Ayodele et al. Beulah Books Publisher
    2. Understanding music book 3. by Mensah
    3. International music and workbook. by Mensah
    4. Recorder (Musical Instrument)
    CHRISTIAN RELIGIOUS STUDIES
    1. Holy Bible (Revised Standard Version)
    2. A Textbook and Workbook on Christian Religious Knowledge for Junior Secondary Schools Books 1 By Fawole A.Y. FABLOPEC Publications
    3. Christian Religious Education and moral instructions by Quaroopoone (A.U.P.)
    4. Christian Religious education for JSS by Adeyinka, A.A (longman)
    5. Fundamentals of CRS and moral instructions by Osubebe (Dores)
    CHRISTIAN RELIGIOUS STUDIES
    1. Holy Bible (Revised Standard Version)
    2. A Textbook and Workbook on Christian Religious Knowledge for Junior Secondary Schools Books 2 By Fawole A.Y. FABLOPEC Publications
    3. Christian Religious Education and moral instructions by Quaroopoone (A.U.P.)
    4. Christian Religious education for JSS by Adeyinka, A.A (longman)
    5. Fundamentals of CRS and moral instructions by Osubebe (Dores)
    CHRISTIAN RELIGIOUS STUDIES
    1. Holy Bible (Revised Standard Version)
    2. A Textbook and Workbook on Christian Religious Knowledge for Junior Secondary Schools Books 3 By Fawole A.Y. FABLOPEC Publications
    3. Christian Religious Education and moral instructions by Quaroopoone (A.U.P.)
    4. Christian Religious education for JSS by Adeyinka, A.A (longman)
    5. Fundamentals of CRS and moral instructions by Osubebe (Dores)
    ISLAMIC STUDIES
    1. Islamic Studies For Junior Secondary Schools Book 1 by Lemu B.A. UP Plc Publisher
    ISLAMIC STUDIES
    1. Islamic Studies For Junior Secondary Schools Book 2 by Lemu B.A. UP Plc Publisher
    ISLAMIC STUDIES
    1. Islamic Studies For Junior Secondary Schools Book 3 by Lemu B.A. UP Plc Publisher
    IGBO LANGUAGE
    1. Igbo maka Junio Sekondiri by Nolue Emenanjo et al. UPL Publisher
    IGBO LANGUAGE
    1. Igbo maka Junio Sekondiri by Nolue Emenanjo et al. UPL Publisher
    IGBO LANGUAGE
    1. Igbo maka Junio Sekondiri by Nolue Emenanjo et al. UPL Publisher
    YORUBA
    1. Eko Ede Yoruba Titun by Mustapha et al. UPL(2009) Publisher
    2. Litireso ati Asa Yoruba by Mobolaji Arowosegbe. Tejama Print (2015) Publisher
    3. A Dictionary of the Yoruba UPL (2008)
    YORUBA
    1. Eko Ede Yoruba Titun by Mustapha et al. UPL(2009) Publisher
    2. Litireso ati Asa Yoruba by Mobolaji Arowosegbe. Tejama Print (2015) Publisher
    3. A Dictionary of the Yoruba UPL (2008)
    YORUBA
    1. Eko Ede Yoruba Titun by Mustapha et al. UPL(2009) Publisher
    2. Litireso ati Asa Yoruba by Mobolaji Arowosegbe. Tejama Print (2015) Publisher
    3. A Dictionary of the Yoruba UPL (2008)
    HAUSA LANGUAGE
    1. Koyon Hausa (Hausa for Beginners) Book 1 by Ismail Junaid, Abdullahi, U. Kafin Hausa & Adamu Mohammed UP Plc Ibandon Publisher
    HAUSA LANGUAGE
    1. Koyon Hausa (Hausa for Beginners) Book 2 by Ismail Junaid, Abdullahi, U. Kafin Hausa & Adamu Mohammed UP Plc Ibandon Publisher
    HAUSA LANGUAGE
    1. Koyon Hausa (Hausa for Beginners) Book 3 by Ismail Junaid, Abdullahi, U. Kafin Hausa & Adamu Mohammed UP Plc Ibandon Publisher
    ARABIC LANGUAG
    1. Basic Arabic for Schools and Colleges Book 1 by Adebayo L.A. et al & Badmus M. A.
    2. Modern Arabic Dictionary (Arabic to English) by David V. Cowon
    ARABIC LANGUAG
    1. Basic Arabic for Schools and Colleges Book 2 by Adebayo L.A. et al & Badmus M. A.
    2. Modern Arabic Dictionary (Arabic to English) by David V. Cowon
    ARABIC LANGUAG
    1. Basic Arabic for Schools and Colleges Book 3 by Adebayo L.A. et al & Badmus M. A.
    2. Modern Arabic Dictionary (Arabic to English) by David V. Cowon
    SOCIAL STUDIES
    1. Social studies for JSS in Nigeria By J.E Ubogu Etal
    2. Basic Concepts of National Values for Upper Level JSS 1 – Civic Education – Security Education By Oladele Odanye. Holad Publishers
    3. Nigeria Secondary social studies book for JSS 1 By Cesac
    SOCIAL STUDIES
    1. Social studies for JSS in Nigeria By J.E Ubogu Etal
    2. Social Studies for Junior Secondary Schools Book 2 UBE Editio By Dayo Olagunju; Ademola Atanda; H.D. Ubah and Abubakar Gada. West Africa Book Publishers Limited
    3. Nigeria Secondary social studies book for JSS 2 By Cesac
    SOCIAL STUDIES
    1. Social studies for JSS in Nigeria By J.E Ubogu Etal
    2. Social Studies for Junior Secondary Schools Book 3 UBE Editio By Dayo Olagunju; Ademola Atanda; H.D. Ubah and Abubakar Gada. West Africa Book Publishers Limited
    3. Nigeria Secondary social studies book for JSS 3 By Cesac
    PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION
    1. Physical and Health Education Handbook 1 for Junior Secondary Schools (UBE Edition) with Workbook byAjiboye G.A. Ajibson Nig. Enterprises
    2. Physical education for JSS 1 by Ajala (macmillian)
    3. physical education for JSS 1 by Anidu Egeneje
    PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION
    1. Physical and Health Education Handbook 2 for Junior Secondary Schools (UBE Edition) with Workbook byAjiboye G.A. Ajibson Nig. Enterprises
    2. Physical education for JSS 2 by Ajala (macmillian)
    3. physical education for JSS 2 by Anidu Egeneje
    PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION
    1. Physical and Health Education Handbook 3 for Junior Secondary Schools (UBE Edition) with Workbook byAjiboye G.A. Ajibson Nig. Enterprises
    2. Physical education for JSS 3 by Ajala (macmillian)
    3. physical education for JSS 3 by Anidu Egeneje

    Scheme of Work on English Language for JSS

    Curriculum for Junior Secondary

    FIRST TERM
    JSS 1 JSS 2 JSS 3
    Wk 1: Review of last term's work Wk 1: Review of last term's work Wk 1: Review of last term's work
    Wk 2:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Introduction to speech
    2. SPEECH WORK- Organs of speech
    3. GRAMMAR- Parts of speech
    4. GRAMMAR- Nouns: – Meaning
    5. GRAMMAR- Nouns: Types of Nouns with examples
    6. READING AND COMPREHENSION- The Family: – (Use any of the recommend texts for JSS 1)
    7. READING AND COMPREHENSION- The Family: – Vocabulary Development – Introduction to Language Skills:
      • Listening skills
      • Speaking Skills
      • Reading Skills
      • Writing Skills
    8. COMPOSITION- Meaning of Composition
    9. COMPOSITION- Types of Composition (Narrative, Descriptive, Argumentative, Expository).
    10. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- What is Literature?
    11. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- The Features of Literature
    12. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Types of Literature – Oral, Historical, Dance Drama, Miming…… With reference to related texts.
    Wk 2:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Listening and Speaking – Revision of pure vowel sound.
    2. GRAMMAR- Revision of parts of speech – Nouns, Pronouns, Verbs and Adjectives.
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Review of the SPQ3R reading technique.
    4. COMPOSITION- Writing an outline for a Narrative Essay – How l spent my last holiday.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Revisit Features of Prose (setting, theme, characterization,…)
    6. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Figures of speech – Alliteration, Personification.
    Wk 2:
    1. GRAMMAR- Parts of speech – Revision
    2. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Scanning for main points
    3. COMPOSITION- Informal letter – Letter to my best friend on my plan for the academic session.
    4. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Introduction to Fiction and Non Fiction
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Examples of Non Fiction
    Wk 3:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Pure Vowels sound (Monotones)
    2. GRAMMAR- PRONOUN
    3. GRAMMAR- Meaning, Identification
    4. GRAMMAR- Types of Pronouns
    5. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Reading Strategies – (SPQ3R) – Survey, Preview, Question, Recite, Recall, Review, and Vocabulary Development Members of the family.
    6. COMPOSITION- Elements of Composition – Introduction, body and conclusion.
    7. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Purpose/Functions of Literature
    8. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Introduction to prose – Use the recommended text.
    Wk 3:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Revision of consonant sounds with emphasis on consonant clusters.
    2. GRAMMAR- Transitive and Intransitive verbs
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Reading to understand the writer’s purpose
    4. COMPOSITION- Descriptive Essay – Writing an outline on a place of interest l visited.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Use the recommended text on prose.
    Wk 3:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Sound bank: Vowels / ə / sound – about, doctor, above, etc.
    2. GRAMMAR- Expressing/Describing Emotions (Verb + Preposition)
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Skimming for Specific Information
    4. COMPOSITION- Writing to a Principal
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Poetry Analysis
    6. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Use the recommended text on prose.
    Wk 4:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Vowel /i:/
    2. GRAMMAR- Verbs
    3. GRAMMAR- Verbs: Definitions, Identification with example.
    4. GRAMMAR- Verbs: Types of Verbs – Transitive, Intransitive, Regular, Irregular, Auxiliary, Lexical.
    5. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Identification of main / supporting ideas.
    6. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Vocabulary Development – Your school subjects.
    7. COMPOSITION- Outlining the differences between Descriptive essay and Narrative essays.
    8. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Introduction to the elements of prose (plot, style, characterization).
    9. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Types of oral literature.
    Wk 4:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Listening and speaking – The / ɪə / sound as in ear, clear, hear, bear, etc.
    2. GRAMMAR- More on Active voice and Passive voice.
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Identification of words that to the writer’s intention on contemporary issues like corruption.
    4. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Vocabulary Development – Word families - in the hospital.
    5. COMPOSITION- Elements of Composition – pre – writing, writing, editing, body and conclusion.
    6. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Features of folktales (didactic, entertaining, riddles,…)
    7. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Use the recommended text on prose.
    Wk 4:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Stress and Intonation continued.
    2. GRAMMAR- Adverbs of Frequency – (often, always, occasionally).
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Reading to cultivate the skill of referencing.
    4. COMPOSITION- Write a story on the topic – All that glitters is not gold.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Use the recommended text on prose.
    6. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Characterization, Theme, Plot in the prose text.
    Wk 5:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Vowel Sound / i /
    2. GRAMMAR- Adjectives.
    3. GRAMMAR- Adjectives: Definition and Identification
    4. GRAMMAR- Types of Adjectives
    5. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Reading to answer specific questions – Test for knowledge and translation level.
    6. COMPOSITION- Narrative Essay – My experience in former school
    7. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Use the recommended text on prose
    8. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Features of Oral Literature
    Wk 5:
    1. SPEECH WORK- / əʊ / sound (go, blow, mow, know ...)
    2. GRAMMAR- More on Tenses (Present, Past and Future)
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Critical Reading – Meaning and steps of critical reading.
    4. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Vocabulary Development – Word families – The police officers job.
    5. COMPOSITION- Descriptive Essay – A local festival
    6. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Use the recommended text on prose.
    Wk 5:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Consonants / 3/ and / d3 / - leisure/ledger and garage/large.
    2. GRAMMAR- Changing positive statements to negative statements using ‘not’.
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Practice scanning, skimming and normal rate reading.
    4. COMPOSITION- How to care for a motor vehicle.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH: Comprehensive study of the prose text.
    6. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH: Introduction the rhyme scheme.
    Wk 6:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Vowel Sound /e/
    2. GRAMMAR- Comparison of Adjectives – Absolute Adjectives
      1. Excellent
      2. Superior
      3. Total
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Differentiating between the main ideas and the supporting ideas in a given passage.
    4. COMPOSITION- Paragraph writing – Arrangement of ideas in logical sequence with introduction and conclusion.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Introduction to Drama
      2. Types and elements of drama
      3. Characterization and themes in the recommended prose text
    Wk 6:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Revision of consonant sounds (t, d, k, g)
    2. GRAMMAR- The present continuous tense.
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION
      1. Reading to identify the meanings of word in various contexts.
      2. Vocabulary Development – Word families – A place of worship
    4. COMPOSITION- Revisit the format of an informal letter and a formal letter.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Use the recommended text on drama
      2. Theme/Setting in the recommended text drama.
    Wk 6:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Contrast consonants / d /, / ð /, / θ / and / z / — advert, father, loathe and zip.
    2. GRAMMAR- Modal Forms – will, can, could, may, that’s Direct and Indirect Forms of Modals.
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION
      1. Reading to differentiate between facts and opinions.
      2. Vocabulary Development – Tourism
    4. COMPOSITION- Distinguish between the Features of Formal and Informal Letters.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Use the recommended drama text
      2. Study the different types of rhyme scheme.
    Wk 7:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Vowel Sound /æ/
    2. GRAMMAR
      1. Definition, Identification
      2. Types of Adverb with examples
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Reading to answer specific questions: test for interpretation level and projection level.
    4. COMPOSITION- Descriptive Essay – A Market place.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Use the recommended text on drama.
      2. Plot and setting in the recommended drama text.
    Wk 7:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Contrasting consonants / p / and / t / (pan, tan, prim, trim, ...)
    2. GRAMMAR- The Past Perfect Tense
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION
      1. Reading to identify the facts and opinions in a given passage.
      2. Vocabulary Development – The language of sports.
    4. COMPOSITION- Narrative Essay – What l do every day.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Use the recommended text on drama.
      2. Characterization and plot in the recommended text.
    Wk 7:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Contrast between /3:/ and /ɔ:/
    2. GRAMMAR- Adjectives and Adverbs Expressing Willingness/Unwillingness using Modal Verbs + Adverbials.
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Reading to make deductions from a selected passage.
    4. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Use the recommended drama text.
      2. Characterization, Diction, setting and plot in the recommended drama text.
    Wk 8:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Vowel Sound /a:/
    2. GRAMMAR- Prepositions
      1. Definition and Identification
      2. Types and Functions with Examples.
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Application of the reading technique (SPQ3R) to given passage.
    4. COMPOSITION
      1. Introduction to Letter Writing
      2. Types of Letter
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Introduction to Folktales
      2. Definition and Types
      3. Narration of a Folktale
    Wk 8:
    1. SPEECH WORK- The consonant sounds /f/ and /v/ - (contrast) – vampire, favour, vanish, famish)
    2. GRAMMAR- Making sentences with Conjunctions.
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION
      1. Reading to explain the facts and opinions in a selected passage.
      2. Vocabulary Development: Word Families – Journalism.
    4. COMPOSITION- Letter writing – A letter to your father on why you like your new school.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Differentiating between a novella and a novel
      2. More of Figures of speech – Onomatopoeia and Personification.
    Wk 8:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Consonants /s/, /ʃ/ and /tʃ/ — ceiling, short, machine and cheque.
    2. GRAMMAR- Adverbs of place and manner
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION
    4. COMPOSITION- Debate – Corruption is worse than armed robbery
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. More on Rhyme Schemes.
      2. Identification of Costumes and Props in the Drama text.
    Wk 9:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Vowel Sound /ɒ/
    2. GRAMMAR- Conjunctions
      1. Definition, Identification
      2. Types
        • Subordinating
        • Coordinating
      3. Functions
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Asking questions to cover all the levels of comprehension (where, when, how, why and what)
    4. COMPOSITION- Features of an informal letter
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Use the recommended text on drama
      2. Introduction to figures of speech (Simile, Metaphor, Irony, ...)
    Wk 9:
    1. SPEECH WORK- The consonant /v/ and /r/
    2. GRAMMAR- Making requests using will, could, may, ...
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION
    4. COMPOSITION- Descriptive Essay – My favorite teacher
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Retell a folktale and explain its theme
      2. Use the recommended text on drama
    Wk 9:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Consonants /ʃ/ and /tʃ/ — sheep/chip and fish/pitch.
    2. GRAMMAR- Idiomatic Expressions.
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION
    4. COMPOSITION- Descriptive Essay – My Favorite Subject
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Questions on the prose text
      2. Questions on the drama text.
    Wk 10:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Vowel Sound /c:/
    2. GRAMMAR- Introduction to Adverbials (Features, Functions and Types)
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Asking specific questions that will elicit student opinion.
    4. COMPOSITION- Informal Letter – Letter to your cousin telling him/her about your new school.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. A review of the recommend texts
      2. Figures of Speech
    Wk 10:
    1. SPEECH WORK- The consonant sound /h/
    2. GRAMMAR- Direct and indirect speech.
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION
    4. COMPOSITION- Formal Letter – A Letter of Invitation (As a guest speaker)
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Revision of the recommend texts
      2. Revision of Literacy terms
    Wk 10:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Consonants /w/ and /j/
    2. GRAMMAR- Adverbs of Cause or Reason – so that, in order, so as.
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Identification of the topic sentence a given passage.
    4. COMPOSITION- Debate – child trafficking is worse than stealing.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Review of the prose text.
      2. Review of the drama text.
    SECOND TERM
    JSS 1 JSS 2 JSS 3
    Wk 1:
    1. REVISION OF LAST TERM
    Wk 1:
    1. REVISION OF LAST TERM
      1. GRAMMAR- Reported speech: rules guiding the use of reported speech.
      2. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Reading to provide alternative words that can fit into the context to replace the target words.
      3. COMPOSITION- Writing a report – Outline and features
      4. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Use the recommended text on prose.
    Wk 1:
    1. REVISION OF LAST TERM’S.
    Wk 2:
    1. SPEECH WORK- /u/ and /u:/
    2. GRAMMAR- Adverbials (Frequency and Manner)
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Asking specific questions that require conclusion to be drawn by students
    4. COMPOSITION- Letter Writing
      1. Formal Letter
      2. Features of a Formal letter
      3. Writing a letter of permission to be absent from school to the principal.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Writing letter ‘w’Folktales – African tales
      1. Features and themes of African folktales (Didactic, Entertainment, magical).
    Wk 2:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Intonation – Identification of Intonation patterns in statements, questions and commands.
    2. GRAMMAR- Making sentences with Prepositions.
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Reading for speed with emphasis on avoidance of vocalizations, regressive reading and reading words instead of phrases.
    4. COMPOSITION- Writing a report – An accident l witnessed.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Use the recommended text on prose
      2. Themes / Characterization in the recommended prose text
    Wk 3:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Consonants /t/ and /0/ — tin/thin and tick/thick.
    2. GRAMMAR- Expressing exception using except, except for, but, apart from.
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Reading for Critical Evaluation.
    4. COMPOSITION- More on writing to a Pen – Pal
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Review the features of folktales
      2. Discuss some folktales.
    Wk 3:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Vowel Sound /u:/
    2. GRAMMAR- Tenses – Simple Present Tense
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION
      1. Asking specific questions that require students to make projections
      2. Vocabulary Development – The Library
    4. COMPOSITION- Formal Letter – A letter to the school authority.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Introduction to poetry – Definition, Feature (concise, unique, ...)
      2. Use the recommended text on prose
    Wk 3:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Intonation/Stress – Making statements, giving commands and asking questions, using different Intonation patterns.
    2. GRAMMAR- Regular and Irregular Verbs.
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION
      1. Techniques of speed reading – surveying, scanning, skimming.
      2. Vocabulary Development – Culture and Tourism
    4. COMPOSITION- Writing an informal letter continued. Letter to a friend about your school inter –sport.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Use the recommended text on drama.
      2. Themes and plot in the recommended drama text.
    Wk 3:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Consonants contrast /t/ and /s/ — tailor/summer, pit/mouse, pat/ pass.
    2. GRAMMAR- Prepositions which express relations with people (with, for, against)
    3. LISTENING COMPREHENSION- Listening for implied meanings
    4. COMPOSITION- The School Prize – Giving Day.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Poetry – Write a short poem on – The lonely child
      2. Write a short story on – How the tortoise got the pattern on his shell
    Wk 4:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Vowel Sound /ʌ/
    2. GRAMMAR- Tenses – Simple Past Tense
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION
      1. Asking specific questions that require recall of ideas and facts.
      2. Vocabulary Development – Marriage related words
    4. COMPOSITION- Guided composition – The Federal Roads Safety Commission
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Poetry – Types (Epic, Lyrics, ...)
      2. Differentiate between oral and written poetry.
    Wk 4:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Stress: Identification of the correct points of pauses in different words (im’port/ ‘import, ‘refuse/re’fuse)
    2. GRAMMAR- Reported commands
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION
      1. Dialogue.
      2. Vocabulary Development – ICT
    4. COMPOSITION- Formal letter – Write to the local government chairman about the bad roads in your area.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Use the recommended text on drama
      2. Language, setting and characterization in the recommended drama text.
    Wk 4:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Contrast consonants /ʃ/ and /3/ — mission/pleasure and vision/measure.
    2. GRAMMAR- The Simple Sentence.
    3. LISTENING COMPREHENSION- Listening to get the main gist or the main points in a paragraph.
    4. COMPOSITION- At the Bus Stop.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Literacy devices in a selected poem
      2. Use the recommended text on prose
    Wk 5:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Vowel Sound /3:/
    2. GRAMMAR- Tenses – The Present Continuous Tense
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Reading to understand the Author’s Mood and expression used in the passage e.g. anger, doubt, joy,...
    4. COMPOSITION- Narrative Essay – The Most Memorable Day of My Life.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Drama – Features (Theme, Costumes, Audience and so on).
      2. Identification of the features of drama in a given text.
    Wk 5:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Rhythm – Identification of the appropriate rhythm in a given poem
    2. GRAMMAR- Reported Requests
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Dialogue continued
    4. COMPOSITION- Argumentative Essay – Herbal medicines of more potent than orthodox medicines.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Identification of some figures of speech in the recommended prose text.
    Wk 5:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Contrast between vowels /ʌ/ and /a:/ — much/march and pun /par.
    2. GRAMMAR- The Compound Sentence
    3. LISTENING COMPREHENSION- Listening to questions in order to answer them.
    4. COMPOSITION- Informal letter – A letter to a friend him/her about your best subject
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Use the recommended text on prose.
      2. Identification of the features of prose.
    Wk 6:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Vowel Sound – /ə/ sound
    2. GRAMMAR- Tenses – The Past Continuous Tense
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION
      1. Reading between the lines to detect the Author’s attitude.
      2. Vocabulary Development – Child Labor and Trafficking
    4. COMPOSITION- Argumentative – Road transportation is safer than air transportation.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Use the recommended text on prose.
    Wk 6:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Review of stress/Intonation
    2. GRAMMAR- Adverbials and the Present Tense
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Vocabulary Development – Science and Technology
    4. COMPOSITION- Expository Essay – Entrepreneurship
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Distinguish between Irony, Euphemism and Hyperbole.
      2. Write a short play on the reward of truancy.
    Wk 6:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Nasal sounds /m/, /n/ & /ŋ/ — mentor, knotty/naughty, fling
    2. GRAMMAR- Punctuation Marks – The Uses of the Capital Letter.
    3. LISTENING COMPREHENSION- Listening to interpret ideas in a selected passage.
    4. COMPOSITION- Informal letter – A letter to your grandfather/mother telling them that you are coming to spend your forthcoming holidays with them.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Use the recommended drama text.
      2. Theme / Setting / Characterization in the recommended drama text.
    Wk 7:
    1. SPEECH WORK-Introduction to vowel contrasting /ɒ/ and /ɜ:/, for example – hot and port; /a:/ and /æ/ e. g. bag, part...
    2. GRAMMAR- Making sentences with the simple present tense and the past tense.
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Reading to identify the overall impression created by the author’s style of presentation.
    4. COMPOSITION- Expository Essay – HIV/AIDS.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Myths and Legends – Comparing Myths and legends.
      2. Use the recommended text on drama
    Wk 7:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Consonants /s/ and /z/ (sip/zip, stone/zebra, this/these, lloos/lose)
    2. GRAMMAR- Introduction to punctuation marks.
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Reading to summarize a selected passage.
    4. COMPOSITION- Narrative Essay – My last birthday
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Summary of the recommend prose text.
    Wk 7:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Vowels /æ/ and /3:/ — bath/birth, arm/earn and farm/firm.
    2. GRAMMAR- Pronouns – Reflexive and Relative Pronouns.
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION
    4. COMPOSITION-Article Writing – The evils of youth unemployment
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Use the recommended drama text.
      2. Lead students to write a playlet.
    Wk 8:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Contrasting vowels /e/ and /ə/ as in egg and burn, pet and shirt.
    2. GRAMMAR- Tenses
      1. Future tense
      2. Making sentences with the simple future tense – will and shall.
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION
      1. Reading to interpret diagrams maps and sketches accurately.
      2. Vocabulary Development – Word Formation using prefixes
    4. COMPOSITION- Argumentative (Arranging ideas in logical sequences).
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Use the recommended text on drama
      2. Myths and Legends – Features (magic, superstition and so on.)
    Wk 8:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Consonant sounds / k / and / g / as in cup /gulp and chaos/alligator.
    2. GRAMMAR- Punctuation marks – The full stop and the comma.
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Reading to identify the main and supporting ideas in a selected passage.
    4. GRAMMAR/ VOCABULARCOMPOSITION- Writing a story – The Meeting.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Summary of the recommend drama text.
    Wk 8:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Vowels /ɜ:/ & /ɜ/ — brought/hot, malt/pot and fought/cot.
    2. GRAMMAR- Personal Pronouns – Rules guiding the use of personal Pronouns.
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSIONs
    4. COMPOSITION- Expository – Drug addiction
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Poetry – Language in poetry
      2. Construct sentences with irony and Hyperbole.
    Wk 9:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Introduction to Diphthongs
    2. GRAMMAR- Making sentences with the simple past tense.
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Reading to identify how a diagram or map clarifies or complements reading material.
    4. COMPOSITION- Guided composition on a festival in my village.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Dramatization of some scenes in the recommended text on drama
    Wk 9:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Consonants /m/, /n/ /s/ as in man, nanny, singer, etc.
    2. GRAMMAR- Punctuation marks continued. The question mark, the colon and the semi – colon.
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION
    4. COMPOSITION
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
    Wk 9:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Vowels /u/ and /u:/ — pull/pool, bush/sue and sugar/food
    2. GRAMMAR- Demonstrative Pronouns
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Reading to summarize paragraphs.
    4. COMPOSITION- Argumentative Essay – Teachers are Better than Farmers in a Society.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Summarizing the prose text
    Wk 10:
    1. REVISION
    Wk 10:
    1. REVISION
    Wk 10:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Vowel /ə/ ( among, above, doctor, again, teacher, about, pastor)
    2. GRAMMAR- Differentiating between Demonstrative Pronouns and Demonstrative Adjectives.
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION
    4. COMPOSITION- Expository writing – Population Explosion
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Revision of the drama text
      2. Revision of the drama text using relevant questions.
    THIRD TERM
    JSS 1 JSS 2 JSS 3
    Wk 1:
    1. REVISION
    2. SPEECH WORK- Diphthongs – /ei/ - place, /oʊ/ - home, /aʊ/ - mouse, /iə/ - clear, /eə/ - care, /ɔi/-boy, /ai/ - find, /ʊə/ - tour.
    3. GRAMMAR- Introduction to active voice and passive voice
    4. READING AND COMPREHENSION
      1. Reading to make meaning from spatial description.
      2. Vocabulary Development – Air Transport
    5. COMPOSITION- Introduction to Expository Essay.
    6. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH-
      1. Use the recommended text on prose.
      2. Theme/characterization in the recommended prose text.
    Wk 1:
    1. REVISION
    2. SPEECH WORK- Revision of stress/Intonation.
    3. GRAMMAR- The use of conjunctions – Although and whereas as contrasts.
    4. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Reading to understand the writer’s purpose by identifying the keywords in a selected passage.
    5. COMPOSITION- A review of Formal Letters and Informal Letters.
    6. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Review of Literacy terms and figures of speech.
    Wk 1:
    1. REVISION
    2. COMPREHENSION/VOCABULARY DEVELOPMENT
    3. ENGLISH STRUCTURE- Review of Nouns and Pronouns
    4. COMPOSITION- Review of Narrative/Descriptive Essays
    5. SPEECH WORK- Review of Monotones
    6. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Review of Major/Minor Characters Theme, Plot, Tragic/Comic Elements and Diction.
    Wk 2:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Identification of Diphthongs in words. For example, /eə/ as in Mary /Meiri/, /ɔi/ as in boil /bɔil/
    2. GRAMMAR- Highlighting the active voice.
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION
      1. Reading to identify appropriate introduction and conclusion for selected topics
      2. Vocabulary Development – Words related to fishing
    4. COMPOSITION- Elements of writing
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Use the recommended text on prose.
      2. Setting / Plot in the recommended text
    Wk 2:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Consonants /t/ & /d/ or /p/ & /b/ at the initial, middle and final position of words.
    2. GRAMMAR- Using despite and inspire with adequate examples.
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Reading to summarize the key ideas from different paragraphs.
    4. COMPOSITION- Future tense using ‘shall’ and ‘will’ Exercises
      Punctuation: Full stops and question marks Exercises
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Use the recommended text on prose.
      2. More on myths and Legends themes in popular myths / Legends.
    Wk 2:
    1. COMPREHENSION /VOCABULARY DEVELOPMENT
    2. ENGLISH STRUCTURE- Review of Verbs and Adverbs
    3. COMPOSITION- Review of Argumentative / Expository Essay
    4. SPEECH WORK- Review of Diphthongs
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Review of Literacy Terms for Poetry
      2. Metaphor, Simile, Alliteration, Irony and so on.
    Wk 3:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Introduction to consonant sounds
    2. GRAMMAR- The Use of Passive with examples
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION
      1. Reading to identify keywords in the passage that signals direction.
      2. Vocabulary Development – words associated with the kitchen.
    4. COMPOSITION- Expository Essay (Guided writing) – The Ebola Virus.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Poetry and Identification of the language used in a selected poem.
    Wk 3:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Consonant Sounds / tʃ / and / ʃ / as in sheep/cheap and mash /march
    2. GRAMMAR- The uses of have, has and had.
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Reading to infer author’s intention in a selected passage.
    4. COMPOSITION- A composition on the topic – pride goes before a fall
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Characterization, Theme and Diction in the recommended prose text.
      2. Write a simple story on Honesty and fair play.
    Wk 3:
    1. COMPREHENSION/VOCABULARY DEVELOPMENT
    2. ENGLISH STRUCTURE- Review of Adjectives, Conjunctions, Prepositions and Interjections.
    3. COMPOSITION- Revisit informal letter, Formal letter and their features
    4. SPEECH WORK- Review of Consonant Sounds
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
    Wk 4:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Syllables – words of two, three, four syllables
    2. GRAMMAR- Exercise on Active voice.
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION
      1. Reading to make meaning from spatial description.
      2. Vocabulary Development – Words associated with the sick bay.
    4. COMPOSITION- Argumentative Essay – Tribalism is a better evil than cultism
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Myths/Legend – Identification of the moral lessons learnt from a legend.
      2. Use the recommended text on drama.
    Wk 4:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Consonant sounds / θ / and / ð / as in think/father and mouth/lathe
    2. GRAMMAR- Synonyms using adequate examples
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION
      1. Reading to identify words/expressions that signal or redirect attention to main point
      2. Vocabulary Development – Words associated with human rights
    4. COMPOSITION-A composition on the topic – The Responsibilities of Government.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Use the recommended text on prose.
      2. Writing simple poem on laziness
    Wk 5:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Syllables
    2. GRAMMAR- Exercise on Passive voice
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Vocabulary Development – Words associated with cooking.
    4. COMPOSITION- Argumentative Essay – Cultism erodes traditional values in a society
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Identification / Explanations of the meaning of a selected poem.
      2. Identification of figures of speech in the selected poems
    Wk 5:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Consonants /w/ and /j/ as in wonder/university and win /yellow.
    2. GRAMMAR- Antonyms – using adequate examples.
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Vocabulary Development – Conflict resolution
    4. COMPOSITION- A topic on – A memorable journey l once made
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Identification of the moral import in the recommended prose text.
      2. Setting / Plot in the recommended prose text.
    Wk 6:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Consonant clusters (asks, school, thrive, please, respect...)
    2. GRAMMAR- Statements and Tag Questions
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION
      1. Vocabulary Development – Words associated with teaching.
      2. Identification of topics sentences.
    4. COMPOSITION- Identify the differences between Argumentative essay and Expository essay.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Use the recommended text on drama
      2. Write a Short play or story.
    Wk 6:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Contrasting vowels / u / and / u: / as in Look/youth and book/food.
    2. GRAMMAR- The use of causative Verbs. For example, blacken – to cause to become black
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Vocabulary Development – Words associated with Religion.
    4. COMPOSITION- Writing a Dialogue
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Use the recommended text on drama
      2. Figures of speech in the recommended drama text
    Wk 7:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Word boundaries – Production of sounds with reference to linking sounds. For example, matter of fact, shah of Iran, bread and butter, poor and blind.
    2. GRAMMAR- Differentiating between polar questions tag questions.
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Vocabulary Development – Spelling Drills
    4. COMPOSITION- Expository Essay: How to plant tress
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Use similes and metaphors in sentences.
    Wk 7:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Contrast between vowels / ɜ: / and / ʌ / ( caught/come and lawn/love)
    2. GRAMMAR- Adverbs of place – by the gate, in the school, on the field,...
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION
    4. COMPOSITION- Composition on the topic – The day l would not like to remember
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Dramatization of some from the recommended text on drama
    Wk 8:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Contrasting /ei/ and / ɪə /. For example date, here, late, cheer.
    2. GRAMMAR- Exercise on Adverbials
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Vocabulary Development – Spelling drills continued.
    4. COMPOSITION- Oral Composition – School Rules
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
      1. Dramatization of an act from the drama text
      2. Turn Similes to Metaphor and vice versa. For example, she is as red as a rose, she is a red rose.
    Wk 8:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Consonant and vowels differentiated
    2. GRAMMAR- Review of prefix and suffix
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION
    4. COMPOSITION- Write a composition on the topic – The Rich also Cry
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- Characterization, Diction, Plot and Theme in the recommended text on drama.
    Wk 9:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Diphthongs – Contrasting / ʊə / and / əʊ / as in tour and pole, etc.
    2. GRAMMAR- REVISION on Nouns, Pronouns, Verbs and Adjectives
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION- Reading for Evaluation.
    4. COMPOSITION- Revise all the types of essays
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH- More on figure of speech Euphemism/pun.
    Wk 9:
    1. SPEECH WORK- Review of the consonant sounds with emphasis on / θ / and / ð /
    2. GRAMMAR- More on Questions Tags
    3. READING AND COMPREHENSION
    4. COMPOSITION- Review the components of Letter writing and Essay writing.
    5. LITERATURE IN ENGLISH

    Scheme of Work on Civic Education

    Curriculum for Nursery

    FIRST TERM
    Nursery 1 - Age 3 Nursery 2 - Age 4 Kindergarten - Age 5
    Wk 1: Social Behaviour
    1. Dicuss the simple meaning of social behaviour
    2. Give examples of social behaviour to pupils- sharing toys, joining queues smiling, playing with others etc.
    3. Encourage interaction between child and other people
    Wk 1: Social Development: Greetings
    1. Ensure that the children understand how to greet appropriately in their mother tongue first, before teaching them the greetings in English.
    2. Discuss the simple meaning of greeting.
    3. Ask the children to demonstrate how they greet an older person politely in their own language, for example: girls kneeling down or boys prostrating.
    Wk 1: Gender Issues in Child Care: Play
    1. Give simple meaning of play
    2. Discuss the meaning of gender.
    3. Guide pupils to identify self as male or female.
      NOTE: Assign duties equally to grouped children irrespective of sex.
    Wk 2: Myself
    1. Give simple meaning of myself
    2. Guide pupils to recognize self as boy or girl
    3. Encourage interaction of pupils with teachers, family members- father, mother, aunt, uncle, grandma, grandpa etc.
    Wk 2: Social Development: Dressing
    1. Discuss simple meaning of dressing.
    2. If possible, show the children real items or pictures of different cultural costumes worn by the Yoruba, Hausa and Ibo people. Help the children to name the items and to identify which items are worn by females and which items are worn by males.
    Wk 2: Gender Issues in Child Care: Games
    1. Discuss functions of games in our society.
    2. List and discuss some local game in our community e.g. suwe, tenten, etc.
      NOTE: Engage pupils in different games irrespective of sex.
    Wk 3: Self Expression
    1. Discuss simple meaning of self expression to pupils
    2. Engage the pupils to ask and talk freely on issues related to them
    3. Develop and show attachment to the pupils e.g. Listening, talking, singing, clapping, telling stories etc.
    Wk 3: Social Development: Eating
    1. Talk to the children about local social habits on eating, for example: washing of hands before and after meals, not talking while eating, sharing food and eating small portions at a time.
    2. Demonstrate how to wash hands properly and how to eat appropriately following local social habits.
    3. Discuss eating habits in the children’s own language first, before reading aloud and introducing the English words in this topic.
    Wk 3: Sharing
    1. Discuss simple meaning of sharing.
    2. Mention and discuss some items that can be shared among pupils e.g. cake, biscuits, sweets, seat, umbrella etc.
    Wk 4: Simple Greeting
    1. Discuss simple meaning of greetings
    2. Encourage pupils to greet at appropriate time of the day or season in their locality at home and school. Example
      GREETINGS RESPONSE
      a) Good morning
      E kaaro
      Good morning sir/ma
      E kaaro sir/ma
      b) Bye-bye
      Odabo
      Bye sir/ma
      Odabo sir/ma
    Wk 4: Cultural Values: Helping others
    1. Give simple meaning of cultural values.
    2. Ask the children to say how they help others at home and in their community. Ask them why it is important to help others. Help them to understand cultural beliefs and values on helping others e.g. feaading younger one, helping the less privileged, caring for older people, feeding domestic animals etc.
    Wk 4: Songs
    1. Discuss the meaning of song
    2. Organise singing activities for children irrespective of sex.
    Wk 5: Respect
    1. Discuss simple meaning of respect.
    2. Encourage children to show respect to elders e.g. teachers, mother, father, older peers.
    Wk 5: Cultural Values: Respect
    1. Give simple meaning of respect.
    2. Talk to the children about respect. Ask them what respect is and how they show it towards others. (Respect is when you are polite to someone, especially if they are older or more important than you.) Help the children to understand the cultural beliefs and values of the community on respect e.g proper greetings, standing up for elders to sit in the school, home, and public places, genuflect when receiving or giving something to older people.
    Wk 5: Folk tales
    1. Tell stories that will make pupils to appreciate one another irrespective of their genders
    2. Encourage few pupils to tell their stories too.
    Wk 6: MID TERM BREAK Wk 6: MID TERM BREAK Wk 6: MID TERM BREAK
    Wk 7: Appreciation
    1. Discuss simple meaning of appreciation
    2. Train the pupils on how to appreciate token of love and gifts by saying 'Thank you'.
    Wk 7: Cultural values: Using songs
    1. Tell a story, or read a story aloud, about a cultural value, for example a story about sharing, helping others or respect. Help the children to recognise the cultural value in the story.
    2. Teach the children rhymes or songs about cultural values (in their mother tongue or in English).
    Wk 7: Natural Shapes
    1. Expose the pupils to different shapes in the environment e.g. full moon-circle, lips-oval, nose-triangle, finger-cylinder etc.
    2. Group pupils for team work skills in identifying the values of natural shapes in our environment.
    Wk 8: Courtesy
    1. Give simple meaning of courtesy.
    2. Encourage children how to show simple courtesy to everyone in school and home.
    3. Expose them to the song on magic words- excuse me, sorry, please.
    Wk 8: Community Values: Playing and rewards
    1. Give simple meaning of values.
    2. Tell a story, or read a story aloud, about community values and reward systems. Help the children to recognise the values and reward systems in the story.
    3. Dicuss some activities in the community that promote values, e.g. play- tenten, who is in the garden, etc.
    Wk 8: Natural colours
    1. Help pupils to identify some natural colours in the environment e.g. wool-white, rose/hibiscus flower-red, leaf-green, sky-blue, egg yolk/ripe mango-yellow etc.
    2. Group pupils to identify natural colours and their values in the environment.
    Wk 9: Honesty and Transparency
    1. Discuss simple meaning of honesty.
    2. Teach songs that portray honesty and transparency
    3. Tell folktales that promote honest living.
    Wk 9: Cultural Activities: Folk tales
    1. Discuss simple meaning of cultural activities.
    2. Participate in healthy competition with pupils on acceptable cultural activities e.g. folktales, tales by moonlight, short local poetry etc.
    Wk 9: Responsibility
    1. Give simple meaning of responsibility.
    2. Guide the pupils to identify simple responsibilities e.g. do not litter class, street, road, gutter or places of worship, punctuality- getting to functions early playing safely etc.
    Wk 10: Revision of Term's work Wk 10: Revision of Term's work Wk 10: Revision of Term's work
    Wk 11: Revision of Term's work Wk 11: Revision of Term's work Wk 11: Revision of Term's work
    Wk 12: Examination Wk 12: Examination Wk 12: Examination
    Wk 13: Closing Activities Wk 13: Closing Activities Wk 13: Closing Activities
    SECOND TERM
    Nursery 1 - Age 3 Nursery 2 - Age 4 Kindergarten - Age 5
    Wk 1:
    1. Review of 1st term's work
    Wk 1:
    1. Review of 1st term's work
    Wk 1:
    1. Review of 1st term's work
    Wk 2: Emosion
    1. Give simple meaning of Emotion.
    2. List some actions expressing emotions e.g. crying, smiling, cuddling, tickling and hugging.
    3. Encourage children to show friendly behaviour towards others and make friends irrespective of sex.
    Wk 2: Social institutions
    1. Explain what a ‘social institution’ is to the children (it is an important place, organisation or tradition that is shared by people).
    2. Give and discuss some institutions in the locality e.g. law court, police station, museum, stadium, palace, school etc.
    Wk 2: Punctuality
    1. Give simple meaning of punctuality.
    2. Recite the poem 'Early to bed...' to the pupils.
    3. Mention and discuss some places/occasions that pupils should be punctual e.g. school, place of worship, naming ceremony, wedding etc.
    Wk 3: Quality Care
    1. Give simple meaning of care of the pupils.
    2. Demonstrate and list some actions of giving quality care to others e.g. Lifting someone that falls down etc.
    Wk 3: Naming ceremony
    1. Talk to the children about a naming ceremony. Describe what happens and explain the importance of the ceremony.
    2. Use a doll to demonstrate how a baby is held during a naming ceremony.
    3. If possible, show the children real items or pictures of items that are used during a naming ceremony, for example: clothing, gifts, food, salt, honey, water and drink.
    Wk 3: Responsibilities: Home
    1. Mention some responsibilities that children can perform at home e.g, sweeping, dusting, washing etc.
    2. List some materials for cleaning e.g. broom, brush, napkin etc.
    3. Encourage pupils to give service to others at home.
    Wk 4: Forming Bonds
    1. Give simple meaning of bonds
    2. List and discuss some traits that can strengthen healthy bonds among children e.g. love, honesty, trust, charity (giving).
    Wk 4: Kinship
    1. Explain the meaning of ‘kin’ to the children (that is, the members of your family).
    2. Help the children to identify their kin, for example: parents, grandparents, siblings, nephews, nieces etc.
    3. Talk about the importance of kin in society.
    Wk 4: Responsibilities: School
    1. Mention some services pupils can give at school e.g. class arrangement, returning lost items, caring for junior pupils in the school etc.
    2. Engage children in role play on how to keep the class and school environment neat and tidy.
    Wk 5: Basic Child's Rights
    1. Give simple meaning of Rights
    2. Discuss some basic Child's Rights to pupils e.g. to life, good health, good food, talk, education, play etc.
    Wk 5: Chieftaincy
    1. Explain the term chieftain to the children (that is, a leader of a group of people who share the same language and customs).
    2. Describe some of the roles of a chieftain in society.
    3. Mention some chieftaincy titles and chieftaincy title holders in the community e.g Oni of Ife, Alaafin of Oyo, Sultan of Sokoto etc
    Wk 5: Responsibilities: religious Places
    1. Guide pupils to take care of personal and communal belongings at the places of worship.
    Wk 6: MID TERM BREAK Wk 6: MID TERM BREAK Wk 6: MID TERM BREAK
    Wk 7:Individual Differences
    1. Discuss simple meaning of individual differences to the pupils
    2. Discuss the individual differences pupils exhibit in the class and train the pupils to respect and accept other pupils
    Wk 7: Religious institutions
    1. Give simple meaning of religion.
    2. Talk about religious institutions in your local area. Identify the institutions and explain to the children, in simple terms, the beliefs and practices of these institutions.
    3. If possible, try to organise for the children to visit different places of worship in their community, for example a church and a mosque.
    Wk 7: Responsibilities: Religious Places
    1. Discuss with the pupils some items to take care of in the places of worship
    Wk 8: Care of Belongings
    1. Discuss the meaning of personal belongings with the pupils
    2. Guide the children to identify some personal belongings e.g. school bag, uniform, socks, shoes, water bottle etc.
    3. Train the pupils on care of personal belongings.
    Wk 8: Peace education
    1. Discuss simple meaning of peace.
    2. Provide opportunities for pupils to listen and react to stories on peace Education.
    3. Talk about the importance of sharing with the children. Encourage them to share toys and other materials in the classroom and at home.
    Wk 8: Obedience
    1. Give simple meaning of obedience.
    2. Mention and discuss some actions of obedience e.g. doing home work, leaving playground after lunch break, obeying traffic rules etc.
    3. Tell stories to pupils on obedience.
    Wk 9: Honesty
    1. Discuss simple meaning of honesty
    2. Discuss and train children how to be honest pupils in the school and at home.
    3. Discourage anti-social behaviour among children.
    Wk 9: Rights and responsibilities
    1. Explain to the children, in simple terms, the meaning of ‘rights’. These are things that the law allows you to do, for example the right to an education (go to school).
    2. Help the children to identify some of their rights, for example: getting an education, eating healthy food, wearing proper clothing, living somewhere safe and getting medical care.
    3. Explain that, with rights, we have responsibilities. These are the things that you must do.
    4. Help the children to identify some of their responsibilities at home and at school, for example: tidying up and washing hands.
    Wk 9: Self Control
    1. Discuss simple meaning of self control.
    2. Discuss some actions to show self control among pupils e.g. to keep away from- fighting, telling lies, stealing etc.
    3. Discuss the rewards of self control.
    Wk 10: Revision of Term's work Wk 10: Revision of Term's work Wk 10: Revision of Term's work
    Wk 11: Revision of Term's work Wk 11: Revision of Term's work Wk 11: Revision of Term's work
    Wk 12: Examination Wk 12: Examination Wk 12: Examination
    Wk 13: Closing Activities Wk 13: Closing Activities Wk 13: Closing Activities
    THIRD TERM
    Nursery 1 - Age 3 Nursery 2 - Age 4 Kindergarten - Age 5
    Wk 1:
    1. Review of 2nd term's work
    Wk 1:
    1. Review of 2nd term's work
    Wk 1:
    1. Review of 2nd term's work
    Wk 2: Social Activities
    1. Discuss the meaning of social activities.
    2. Discuss and list some social activities in the community with the pupils e.g. birthday, cultural dance, naming ceremony etc.
    3. Interact with the children and encourage them to socialize with others.
    Wk 2: Conflict resolution
    1. Give simple meaning of conflict; resolution
    2. Ask the children to identify good behaviour and bad behaviour in the classroom. Talk about why it is important to behave well in the classroom or at school.
    3. Reward good behaviour and discourage bad behaviour in your classroom.
    4. Discuss with the children ways of solving problems peacefully, for example: talking about the problem, using positive language, asking the teacher to help you and not hurting others.
    Wk 2: Orderliness: Home
    1. Discuss simple meaning of orderliness.
    2. Discuss with pupils how to maintain orderliness at home e.g. bathroom, toilet, kitchen etc.
    Wk 3: Conflict Resolution
    1. Discuss simple meaning of conflict and resolution.
    2. Discuss and train the pupils on anti-social behaviour e.g. busing, fighting, stealing etc.
      Teachers and caregivers are advised to respond appropriately to child's/pupils' anti-social behaviour.
    Wk 3: Emotional Development: Confidence
    1. Discuss simple meaning of confidence.
    2. Discuss some habits pupils are to exhibit to have confidence in themselves and others e.g. trust, love, honest etc.
    3. Encourage the children to develop their confidence by identifying all the things they can do.
    Wk 3: Orderliness: Neatness
    1. Give simple meaning of neatness.
    2. Expose and discuss the importance of neatness in the house.
    3. Expose pupils to posters/charts showing neatness at home.
    Wk 4: Child's Basic Rights
    1. Discuss the meaning of rights to pupils.
    2. List and discuss some rights to pupils e.g. love, education, good food, health, play etc.
    Wk 4: Emotional Development: Self-expression
    1. Give simple meaning of self expression.
    2. Talk to the children about what makes them happy and what makes them sad.
    3. Encourage the children to express their feelings verbally and through play, songs and dance.
    4. Encourage the children to express themselves through a variety of activities including drawing, writing, moulding, singing and drama.
    Wk 4: Orderliness: School
    1. Discuss with pupils the meaning of orderliness at schools.
    2. Mention some places where laws and orders should be maintained. e.g. in the school assembly, playground, corridors, stairways, grocery, books store, library etc.
    Wk 5: Play Activities
    1. Stimulate the pupils with a variety of toys and other useful materials to learn as they play.
    2. List and encourage children to participate in some activities e.g. dance, clap, run, jump, play with toys etc.
    Wk 5: Psychosocial values: Expression of attitude
    1. Give simple meaning of attitude to the pupils.
    2. Talk to the children about what is the right attitude to have towards school work, for example: to concentrate, to try hard, to ask for help when needed and to enjoy what you are doing.
    3. Talk about why it is important to have the right attitude towards school work, for example: you will learn things, you will be ready for Kindergarten and you will make friends.
    Wk 5: Orderliness: Community
    1. Discuss with pupils the meaning of orderliness in the community.
    2. Mention and discuss some places wher laws and orders should be maintained in the community e,g. bank, local market, supermarket, queue at bus stop, school, clinic/hospital etc.
    Wk 6: MID TERM BREAK Wk 6: MID TERM BREAK Wk 6: MID TERM BREAK
    Wk 7: Gender Fairness
    1. Discuss simple meaning of gender.
    2. Guide the pupils to identify gender differences e.g. boy-girl, man-woman.
    3. Initiate plays and activities that will promote fairness among gender.
    Wk 7: Psychosocial Values: Love and care
    1. Talk about the meaning of ‘love’ with the children (that is, to like someone very much).
    2. Ask the children to identify whom they love, for example: parents, grandparents, good friends and pets.
    3. Encourage the children to demonstrate how to show love, for example: by sharing and helping one another.
    Wk 7: Orderliness: Community
    1. Train pupils how to take turns in a queue.
    2. Train pupils how to maintain peace and order in public places with the use of posters/ charts, drama, songs, rhymes.
    Wk 8: Child's Environment
    1. Discuss simple meaning of environment.
    2. Discuss and demonstrate how pupils can take care of the environment e.g. pruning of flowers, sweeping, use of litter bins.
    3. Guide the pupils to explore the school environment.
    Wk 8: Psychosocial Values: Appreciation and trust
    1. Explain the meaning of ‘appreciation’ to the children (that is, when you are thankful for something, such as a gift or gesture, you appreciate it).
    2. Have the children work in pairs to role-play saying “Thank you” using the appropriate language and gestures, according to local social customs.
    3. Then talk about the meaning of ‘trust’ with the children (that is, trust is the belief that someone is good and honest and who will not harm you or let you down; if someone can be trusted, we say they are trustworthy).
    Wk 8: Cooperation: Home
    1. Discuss simple meaning of cooperation between children and their parents
    2. Give examples of cooperation among pupils, between pupil and parents on food, schooling, health/ cleanliness etc.
    Wk 9: Correct Dressing
    1. Discuss the meaning of dressing with the pupils.
    2. Guide the pupils to identify the differnces in the dressing of boys and girls.
    3. Mention some clothes for boys e.g. shirt, shorts, trousers and for girls e.g. skirt, blouse, wrapper.
    Wk 9: Emotional State: Fear, sadness and anger
    1. Explain the meanings of ‘fear’, ‘sadness’ and ‘anger’ to the children, for example: fear is when we feel scared; sadness is when we feel upset; anger is when we feel cross.
    2. Demonstrate facial expression of fear to pupils.
    3. Mention some states of fear (punishment from elders, alone in dark place etc) and sadness (failure of academic work, missing a flight, losing money etc)
    4. Discuss with the children how to behave appropriately when you feel fear, sadness or anger, for example: talk to someone, comfort yourself with a toy or book, listen to soothing music, draw a beautiful picture, look at or read a funny story or use a punching bag or pillow to express anger.
    Wk 9: Cooperation: Schools:
    1. Discuss simple meaning of cooperation between the pupils and the school authority.
    2. Give examples of cooperation among the pupils, pupils and teachers e.g. class work, team work, project, debate, quiz etc.
    Wk 10: Revision of Term's work Wk 10: Revision of Term's work Wk 10: Revision of Term's work
    Wk 11: Revision of Term's work Wk 11: Revision of Term's work Wk 11: Revision of Term's work
    Wk 12: Examination Wk 12: Examination Wk 12: Examination
    Wk 13: Closing Activities Wk 13: Closing Activities Wk 13: Closing Activities

    Scheme of Work on Computer

    Curriculum for Nursery

    FIRST TERM
    Nursery 2 - Age 4 Kindergarten - Age 5
    Wk 1:
    1. Introduction Content
    Wk 1:
    1. Revision
    Wk 2-3:
    1. Identification Tracing and Colouring of the Monitor
    Wk 2-3:
    1. Meaning of a Computer
    Wk 4-5:
    1. Identification Tracing and Colouring of the Keyboard
    Wk 4-5:
    1. Components of the Computer System
    Wk 6-7:
    1. Identification Tracing and Colouring of the Mouse
    Wk 6-7:
    1. The monotor
    Wk 8-9:
    1. Identification Tracing and Colouring of the System Unit
    Wk 8-9:
    1. The Keyboard
    Wk 10:
    1. Identification Tracing and Colouring of the System Printer
    Wk 10:
    1. Keys on the keyboard
    Wk 11: Revision of Term's work Wk 11: Revision of Term's work
    Wk 12: Examination Wk 12: Examination
    Wk 13: Closing Activities Wk 13: Closing Activities
    SECOND TERM
    Nursery 2 - Age 4 Kindergarten - Age 5
    Wk 1:
    1. Review of 1st term's work
    Wk 1:
    1. Review of 1st term's work
    Wk 2-3:
    1. The Desktop Computer (Show picture/sample
    Wk 2-3:
    1. The Mouse
    Wk 4-5:
    1. The Laptop (Show picture/sample)
    Wk 4-5:
    1. The Central Processing Unit
    Wk 6-7:
    1. Different between laptop and desktop computers
    Wk 6-7:
    1. The Printer
    Wk 8-10:
    1. The computer room (take the children to visit the room)
    Wk 8:
    1. The Speakers
    Wk 9-10:
    1. Why we use Computers in the School
    Wk 11: Revision of Term's work Wk 11: Revision of Term's work
    Wk 12: Examination Wk 12: Examination
    Wk 13: Closing Activities Wk 13: Closing Activities
    THIRD TERM
    Nursery 2 - Age 4 Kindergarten - Age 5
    Wk 1:
    1. Review of 2nd term's work
    Wk 1:
    1. Review of 2nd term's work
    Wk 2-4:
    1. Care of the Computer
    Wk 2-3:
    1. Uses of the Computer
    Wk 5-7:
    1. Uses of the Computer
    Wk 4-6:
    1. The Computer Room
    Wk 8-10:
    1. Advantages of using the Computer
    Wk 7-9: Places where Computers are use. E.g Hospital
    Wk 10:
    1. Advantages of using the Computer
    Wk 11:
    1. Revision of Term's work
    Wk 11:
    1. Revision of Term's work
    Wk 12: Examination Wk 12: Examination
    Wk 13: Closing Activities Wk 13: Closing Activities

    Scheme of Work for Nursery

    Curriculum for Bible Story

    FIRST TERM
    Nursery 1 - Age 3 Nursery 2 - Age 4 Kindergarten - Age 5
    Wk 1: Adjusting to School Life
    1. Teacher begins and end each lesson with a prayer.
    Wk 1: Review of 1st term's work
    1. Teacher begins and end each lesson with a prayer.
    Wk 1: Review of 1st term's work
    1. Teacher begins and end each lesson with a prayer.
    Wk 2: The Attributes of God (God our father)
    1. Teacher ask children, who is God? Guide children to know the Attributes of Our Father God: (God is Loving, Kind, compassionate, Giving, Faithful, Merciful, Strong, Forgiving, Good, Righteous, Caring, Sovereign, Shepherd, Ever-Present, Refuge, Gracious, healer, Powerful, Helper, One Who Saves, The One Who Makes All Things New, etc.)
    2. Teacher explain the terms to children in simple sentence and language.
    Wk 2: God is our father (The Story of Creation) (Genesis 1)
    1. Teacher read the story with illustration of the creation: 'Long ago, there was no world, no sky, no planets, no animals, and no people. God created the world and all that is in it. He created everything in six days. On the seventh day, God rested. God is very powerful. He simply spoke words and things were created'.
    2. Teach the creation song. Melody and lyrics are available at:
      Click Here to Watch the youtube
    Wk 2: The Attributes of God (As Supreme Being, Immortal, etc)
    1. Teacher ask children, who is God? Guide children to know the Attributes of Our Father God: (God has no origin, God never change, God has no needs, God is all powerful, God is all knowing, God is always everywhere, God is wise, God is faithful, God is good, God is just, God is merciful, God is gracious, God is loving, God is Holy, God is Glorious, etc.)
    2. Teacher explain the terms to children in simple sentence and language.
    Wk 3: God makes Things 1 ( The Story of Creation) (Gen 1-3)
    1. Teach the creation song. Melody and lyrics are available at:
      Click Here to Watch the youtube
    2. Display a flash card of creation day to children
      • DAY 1 (Gen 1:3-5). God made light, day, and night. God said it was good.
      • DAY 2 (Gen 1:6-8). God made the sky. God said it was good.
      • DAY 3 (Gen 1:9-13). God made the land and seas, plants, and trees. God said it was good.
    Wk 3: Creation Day 1 & 2
    1. Teacher uses flash card or creation picture to explain each reaction day.
      On the first day of creation, God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light. On that day, He created day and night, light and darkness.
    2. On the second day, God spoke, and He created the sky.
    Wk 3: The Good and Bad Son ( Cain and Abel) (Genesis 4:1-26)
    1. Have children tell about a time when they didn’t get along with a brother or a sister.
    2. Read the story of Cain and Abel to Children.
    3. Teach children the “Cain and Abel” song. Click on:
      Click Here to Watch the youtube
    Wk 4: God makes Things 2 (The Story of Creation) (Gen 1)
    1. Ask children to sing the creation song. Melody and lyrics are available at:
      Click Here to Watch the youtube
    2. Display a flash card of creation day to children
      • DAY 4 (Gen 1:14-19). God made the sun, the moon, and the stars. God said it was good.
      • DAY 5 (Gen 1:20-23). God made the birds and all the creatures of the sea. God said it was good.
      • DAY 6 (Gen 1:24-31). God made all the animals and man. God said it was very good.
      • DAY 7 (Gen 2:1-3). God rested.
    Wk 4: Creation Day 3 & 4
    1. Teacher uses flash card or creation picture to explain each reaction day.
      On the third day, God said, “Let dry ground appear. Let the land produce . . . plants and trees with fruit and seeds.” And it was so.
    2. On the fourth day, God created great lights in the sky—the sun, the moon, and the stars.
    Wk 4: God makes Solomon wise (The Story of King Solomon) (1 Kings 3, 10)
    1. Read the story of King Solomon to children.

      After David died, his son Solomon became king, although he was still very young. One night, God said to him in a dream, “Ask for whatever you want, and I will give it to you.”
      “I want to be wise, to know right from wrong, so that I may be a good king.”
      God said, “Because you did not ask to be rich or powerful, but to care for your people, I will bless you with both great wisdom and great wealth.”
      Solomon became famous for his wisdom, and people came from all over the world to ask him questions. In a faraway kingdom, the powerful Queen of Sheba heard of Solomon and decided to test him.
      She asked him questions that no one in her kingdom could answer. After each question Solomon closed his eyes for a moment and then told her the answer.
      The Queen of Sheba was amazed. “What makes you so wise?”
      “All wisdom comes from God,” Solomon replied.
      “Praise God,” she said, “for he has given your people a wise and righteous king.”

    2. Ask children to pray this prayer...
      Dear God, help me to be wise and make good decisions.
    Wk 5: The first man and womam (The story of Adam and Eve) (Gen 2:8-25)
    1. Teacher introduce this study to children with a Show of the animated story of Adam and Eve. Visit:
      Click Here to Watch the youtube
    2. Teacher explain these highlight to children
      • Adam was the first person God created.
      • Adam lived in the Garden of Eden.
      • Adam named all the animals God created.
      • God created Eve to be Adam’s helper.
      • God loved Adam and Eve very much.
        God loves us!
    Wk 5: Creation Day 5 & 6
    1. Teacher uses flash card or creation picture to explain each reaction day.
      On the fifth day, God filled the waters with living creatures. He filled the skies with birds. So God created fish and lobsters, whales, eagles, robins and sparrows, and all other water creatures and birds.
      Each day, God looked at all He had created. He liked it all. He said it was all good.
    2. On the sixth day, God made all the animals and man. God said it was very good.
    Wk 5: Different Languages (The Tower of Babel) (Genesis 10-11)
    1. Read the story with illustration of the Tower of Babel to the children.
    2. Teach the song "Jesus Loves the Little Children".
      Click Here to Watch the youtube
    3. Then pass out note cards to the kids—a different card and phrase for each one:
      "Lucy Goosie", "Pingo Pongo", "Abu Dabi", "Hee Haw", “Missy Sissy”, “Rub-a-Dub”, “Jing-a-ling", "Cat bird seat", "Rolling rolling".
    4. Now ask each child to sing their new words/phrases to the same tune to show how confusing the language change would have been to the people of Babel. Switch cards and repeat.
    Wk 6: MID TERM BREAK Wk 6: MID TERM BREAK Wk 6: MID TERM BREAK
    Wk 7: How we worship
    1. Teacher flash cards or/and play a clip/video on singing praises, dancing, praying etc to children
    2. Ask children. What are they doing? (Worshiping God)
    Wk 7: The Story of Adam and Eve
    1. Show the children the animated story of Adam and Eve:
      Click Here to Watch the youtube
    2. Teacher explain these highlight to children
      • Adam was the first person God created.
      • Adam lived in the Garden of Eden.
      • Adam named all the animals God created.
      • God created Eve to be Adam’s helper.
      • God loved Adam and Eve very much.
        God loves us!
    Wk 7: The Birth of Jesus Christ (Visit of the Angel) (Luke 1)
    1. Teacher shows children picture of Mary visited by an Angel.
    2. Read to the children the story with illustration of the visit of the Angel to Mary.

      Mary lived in Nazareth. One day the angel Gabriel came with a message. “Greetings, Mary, the Lord is with you,” Gabriel said. “God has chosen you to be the mother of his only Son, Jesus.”

      At first, Mary was puzzled, but she loved God and believed his promises. “I am God’s servant,” she said. “I will do whatever he asks.” Gabriel left, and Mary hurried to tell her cousin Elizabeth the wonderful news!

    Wk 8: The Birth of Jesus (Luke 1–2; Matthew 1:18–25)
    1. Teacher find a manger scene. Have children set it up as the story of Jesus birth is read to them.
    2. Watch the story of Jesus’ life on:
      Click Here to Watch the youtube
    Wk 8: The Lord's Prayer
    1. Teach children to recite the Lord's Prayer

      Our Father, who art in Heaven,
      hallowed be thy name.
      Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done,
      on Earth as it is in Heaven.
      Give us this day our daily bread.
      And forgive us our trespasses,
      as we forgive those who trespass against us.
      And lead us not into temptation,
      but deliver us from evil.
      For thine is the kingdom, the power,
      and the glory, for ever and ever.
      Amen.
    Wk 8: The Birth of Jesus Christ (Jesus is Born) (Luke 2)
    1. Teacher shows children picture of Mary, Joseph, and Baby Jesus in a manger.
    2. Read to the children the story of the Birth of Jesus.

      When it was almost time for Mary’s baby to be born, Caesar Augustus wondered how many people lived in his kingdom. So Mary and Joseph went to Bethlehem to be counted.

      Joseph searched for somewhere to stay, but there wasn’t any room. All he could find was a cave with animals in it. Soon Mary’s baby was born. It was Baby Jesus! A new star appeared in the sky, and shepherds heard angels singing, “Glory to God! Today, Jesus the Savior is born!”

    Wk 9: Jesus Gets Visitors (The Three Wise Men) (Matthew 2:1–12)
    1. The wise men brought Jesus gifts. Ask children, if you had been going to see baby Jesus what would you have taken to him?
    2. Teach children “Jesus Our Brother Kind and Good”. Have children sing the verses for the shepherds, the wise men, the donkey.
      Click Here to Watch the youtube
    Wk 9: The Birth of Jesus (Luke 1–2; Matthew 1:18–25)
    1. Teacher find a manger scene. Have children set it up as the story of Jesus birth is read to them.
    2. Watch the story of Jesus’ life on:
      Click Here to Watch the youtube
    Wk 9: The Baptism of Jesus Christ (Matthew 3 & Luke 3)
    1. Teacher shows children picture of Jesus Christ and John the Baptist, when Jesus was Baptized by John.
    2. Teacher read to children the story with illustration of the Baptism of Jesus Christ.
    3. Teacher highlight to children that:
      • John baptized men with water.
      • John baptized women with water.
      • John baptized Jesus with water.
      • God baptized Jesus with the Holy Spirit.
    Wk 10: CHRISTMAS alphabet poem.
    1. With the children look at the CHRISTMAS alphabet poem.
      • 'C' is for the Christ child, born upon this day,
      • 'H' for herald angels in the night,
      • 'R' means our Redeemer,
      • 'I' means Israel,
      • 'S' is for the star that shone so bright,
      • 'T' is for three wise men, they who traveled far,
      • 'M' is for the manger where he lay,
      • 'A'’s for all He stands for,
      • 'S' means shepherds came.
      • And that’s why there’s a Christmas day.
    Wk 10: The Wise men visit to Jesus (Matthew 2:1–12)
    1. The wise men brought Jesus gifts. Ask children, if you had been going to see baby Jesus what would you have taken to him?
    2. Teach children “Jesus Our Brother Kind and Good”. Have children sing the verses for the shepherds, the wise men, the donkey.
      Click Here to Watch the youtube
    Wk 10: Jesus Raised the Dead (The Twelve year old girl) (Luke 12:40-50)
    1. Teacher shows children picture of Jesus Christ and the Girl raised from death to life.
    2. Teacher read to children the story of the twelve year old girl raised to life.

      A man named Jairus ran to Jesus with tears streaming down his face. “Please, Master, my daughter is dying. Come quick.”

      When they got to Jairus’ house, the girl had already died, and everyone was weeping.

      “Don’t cry,” Jesus said. “She’s just sleeping.” Jesus took Jairus and the girl’s mother into the room where she lay. He took the little girl’s hand and said, “Child of God, wake up!” She immediately sat up in bed!

      Then her stomach growled. Jesus smiled and said, “Feed her. She’s hungry.”

    Wk 11: Revision of Term's work Wk 11: Revision of Term's work Wk 11: Revision of Term's work
    Wk 12: Examination Wk 12: Examination Wk 12: Examination
    Wk 13: Closing Activities Wk 13: Closing Activities Wk 13: Closing Activities
    SECOND TERM
    Nursery 1 - Age 3 Nursery 2 - Age 4 Kindergarten - Age 5
    Wk 1:
    1. Teacher begins and end each lesson with a prayer.
    Wk 1:
    1. Teacher begins and end each lesson with a prayer.
    Wk 1:
    1. Teacher begins and end each lesson with a prayer.
    Wk 2: Prayer I
    1. Give simple meaning of Prayer and why we pray to children.
    2. Teach children to recite the Lord's Prayer

      Our Father, who art in Heaven,
      hallowed be thy name.
      Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done,
      on Earth as it is in Heaven.
      Give us this day our daily bread.
      And forgive us our trespasses,
      as we forgive those who trespass against us.
      And lead us not into temptation,
      but deliver us from evil.
      For thine is the kingdom, the power,
      and the glory, for ever and ever.
      Amen.
    Wk 2: Obedience (The Story of Abraham) (Genesis 15, 17)
    1. Read to the children the story of Abraham.
    2. Watch the video of Abraham and Sarah with the children.
      Click Here to Watch the youtube
    3. Teach children the song, “Father Abraham”.
      Click Here to Watch the youtube
    Wk 2: The Good Samaritan (God wants us to turn our enemies into friends) (Luke 10)
    1. Teacher shows children picture of the robbed Jewish man, the priest and the Samaritan.
    2. Read to children the story with illustration of the Good Samaritan.

      Jesus told a story to explain "who is my neighbor”

      “One day, a Jewish man was robbed and wounded and left lying in the road...

    Wk 3: Jesus teaches us to pray (Our Lord's Prayer) (Luke 11:1-8) II
    1. Teach children to recite the Lord's Prayer
    2. Teach children to recite the Lord's Prayer

      Our Father, who art in Heaven,
      hallowed be thy name.
      Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done,
      on Earth as it is in Heaven.
      Give us this day our daily bread.
      And forgive us our trespasses,
      as we forgive those who trespass against us.
      And lead us not into temptation,
      but deliver us from evil.
      For thine is the kingdom, the power,
      and the glory, for ever and ever.
      Amen.
    Wk 3: A prophetic sign (The birth of Esau and Jacob) (Genesis 25)
    1. Read to children the story of the birth of Esau and Jacob.

      Rebekah’s pregnancy was not comfortable; the two babies were constantly jostling one another in her womb, so much so that she asked God what was happening. God told her that two nations were in her womb; one would be stronger than the other, and the older would serve the younger.
      When the time came for her delivery, two baby boys were born. The first to appear was red, with a body covered in hair, and so they named him Esau (“Hairy”). His brother was born immediately afterward, so close that he was grasping Esau’s heel, and so they called him Jacob (“He grasps the heel”). This beginning would symbolize the lifelong strife between the two brothers.

    Wk 3: The Birth of Moses (God protects his children) (Exodus 2)
    1. Teacher shows children picture of baby Moses in a basket in a river.
    2. Read to the children the story with illustration of the birth of Moses
    3. Teach children to sing “Baby Moses in a Basket”.
      Click Here to Watch the youtube
    4. Play “Who’s that Crying?” Children can sit in a circle. One in the middle is blindfolded. Children take turns "crying”. The blindfolded person must guess WHO’S THAT CRYING? If the blindfolded person guesses who was crying, he changes places.
    Wk 4: The twelve disciples
    1. Read the story of the twelve disciples or Intoduce this topic with a flash card or Watch a clip of the twelve disciples
    2. Children should learn from this lesson that Jesus has friends
    Wk 4: The Parriage Pot (Esau sells his birthright) (Genesis 25)
    1. Teach children the story of how Esau sold his birthright.
    2. Talk about playing tricks on one another and why it is not a good practice.
    3. Teach the children the song, “Jacob’s Ladder”.
      Click Here to Watch the youtube
    4. Have children act out the story of Esau and Jacob.
    Wk 4: Let My People Go (The ten plagues) (Exodus 7-15)
    1. Teacher shows to the children pictures of the ten plagues sent by God to the Egyptian and crossing the Red Sea.
    2. Read to the children the story with illustration of the ten plauges
    Wk 5: Jesus Goes to Jerusalem with His Parents (luke 2)
    1. Read the story of Jesus and his parents going into Jerusalem or Watch with the children a video of Jesus Goes to Jerusalem with His Parents and teaching elders in the temple.
    2. Children should learn from the lesson that God makes Jesus wise
    Wk 5: Joseph’s Coat of Many Colors (Genesis 37)
    1. Read the story of Joseph’s Coat of Many Colors.
    2. Joseph and the Dream Coat: Have children do choral speaking of the Joseph story. A copy can be downloaded from:Click Here
    3. Watch the clip from the Andrew Lloyd Weber musical:Click Here
    Wk 5: The Ten Commandments (God tells his people how they should live) (Exodus 20)
    1. Show to the children the picture of Moses with the Tablet (Ten Commandments)
    2. Read the ten commandment to children in simple and understanding sentences.

      Put God first.
      Do not worship other gods.
      Respect God’s name.
      Keep a day to rest and pray.
      Listen to your mother and father.
      Do not hurt anyone.
      Mothers and fathers must love each other.
      Do not take anything without asking.
      Tell the truth.
      Be thankful for what you have.

    Wk 6: MID TERM BREAK Wk 6: MID TERM BREAK Wk 6: MID TERM BREAK
    Wk 7: Jesus Is Baptized (Matthew 3 & Luke 3)
    1. Read the story of Jesus Baptism or Watch with the children the baptism of Jesus Christ.
    2. Children should learn from the lesson that God blesses Jesus
    Wk 7: Joseph and His Brothers (Joseph Is Sold into Slavery) (Genesis 37)
    1. Read the story of Joseph and his brother, how his brothers sold him into slavery and that God has a plan for Joseph.
    Wk 7: Daniel in the Lions' Den (God is always with us) (Daniel 6)
    1. Show to children picture of Daniel and Lions in the Lions' Den.
    2. Read to children the story of Daniel in the Lions' Den
    3. Ask children to pray this prayer...
      Dear God, be with me when I am in danger.
    Wk 8: Jesus Turns Water into Wine (John 2)
    1. Read the story of Jesus turning Water into Wine or Watch with the children the miracle of Jesus Turns Water into Wine
    2. Children should learn from the lesson that God brings joy.
    Wk 8 The Strongest Man (The Story of Samson) (Judges 15-16):
    1. Show to the children pictures of samson kill a lion, kill the Philistines soldiers, and fall the philistines' temple pillar
    2. Read to the children the story of Samson.
    Wk 8: The Death of Jesus (Matthew 27)
    1. Read the story of the death of Jesus or Watch with the children the crucifixion of Jesus Christ
    2. Children should learn from the lesson that God suffers for us.
    3. Ask children to pray this prayer...
      Dear God, help me to forgive just as Jesus forgave.
    Wk 9: The Death of Jesus (Matthew 27)
    1. Read the story of the death of Jesus or Watch with the children the crucifixion of Jesus Christ
    2. Children should learn from the lesson that God suffers for us.
    3. Ask children to pray this prayer...
      Dear God, help me to forgive just as Jesus forgave.
    Wk 9: Jesus fed many people (Jesus and the Loaves and the Fishes) (Matthew 14:13–21)
    1. Read the story of Jesus fed many people to children
    2. Have children watch the “Loaves and the Fishes” video.
      Click Here to Watch the youtube
    3. Read the story of “Stone Soup” to the children. Talk about how good things can result when everyone pitches in and helps.
    4. Discuss how everyone can help with a neighborhood or school project by pitching in and helping. Look for community or school projects where children may help out.
    Wk 9: Jesus Is Alive (God raises Jesus from the dead) (Luke 24 & John 20)
    1. Show to the children picture of the empty tomb, and picture of Jesus Alive.
    2. Read the story of the resurrection of Jesus to the children
    3. Ask children to pray this prayer...
      Dear God, help me to see that Jesus lives.
    Wk 10: The Resurrection of Jesus Christ (Luke 24 & John 20)
    1. Tell children the story of the resurrection of Jesus Christ or Watch with the children the resurrection of Jesus Christ
    2. Children should learn from the lesson that God raises Jesus from the dead.
    3. Ask children to pray this prayer...
      Dear God, help me to see that Jesus lives.
    Wk 10: Death and Resurrection of Jesus Christ
    1. A good way to share this with children is by reading them the story of Benjamin’s Box. This is available in many libraries or online though Amazon at:
      Click Here
    2. Watch the video with the children:
      Click Here to Watch the youtube
    3. Teach the children the John 3:16 song, “For God so loved the world”.
      Click Here to Watch the youtube
    4. Follow the steps for making palm frond crosses. Use them as gifts for Easter.
      Click Here
    5. Ask children to pray this prayer...
      Dear God, help me to see that Jesus lives.
    Wk 10: The Coming of the Holy Spirit (God gives his gift) (Acts 2)
    1. Show to the children pictures of the Apostles of Jesus in a room with a tongues of fire on their head. Tell children the tongues of fire on their head is the gift of the Holy Spirit sent by God.
    2. Read to children the story of the coming of the Holy Spirit.
    3. Ask children to pray this prayer...
      Dear God, fill me with your spirit.
    Wk 11: Revision of Term's work Wk 11: Revision of Term's work Wk 11: Revision of Term's work
    Wk 12: Examination Wk 12: Examination Wk 12: Examination
    Wk 13: Closing Activities Wk 13: Closing Activities Wk 13: Closing Activities
    THIRD TERM
    Nursery 1 - Age 3 Nursery 2 - Age 4 Kindergarten - Age 5
    Wk 1:
    1. Teacher begins and end each lesson with a prayer.
    Wk 1:
    1. Teacher begins and end each lesson with a prayer.
    Wk 1:
    1. Teacher begins and end each lesson with a prayer.
    Wk 2: David and Jonathan I (1 Samuel 18:1-4)
    1. Tell children the story of David and Jonathan or Watch with the children the a video of David and Jonathan
    2. Children should learn from the lesson a true friendship and how to make good friends.
    Wk 2: A friend of God (Abraham’s Sacrifice Isaac)
    1. Talk about how we make sacrifices for others. Have the children give examples.
    2. Read the story of Abraham’s Sacrifice Isaac to children.
    3. Teach the children “Isaac’s Song”:
      Click Here to Watch the youtube
    Wk 2: Jacob's Family (His children) (Genesis 30:1–24)
    1. With description, explanation or illustration, read to the children the 12 sons of Jacob and the meaning of their names.
      SONS OF JACOB
      1. Reuben (“See, a son”), Jacob’s first son with Leah
      2. Simeon (“He who hears”), second son with Leah
      3. Levi ( “Attached”), third son with Leah
      4. Judah (“Praise”), fourth son with Leah
      5. Dan (“He has vindicated”), with Rachel’s slave Bilhah
      6. Naphtali (“My struggle”), with Rachel’s slave Bilhah
      7. Gad (“Good fortune”), with Leah’s slave Zilpah
      8. Asher (“Happy”), with Leah’s slave Zilpah
      9. Issachar (“Hired”), fifth son with Leah
      10. Zebulun (“Honored”), sixth son with Leah
      11. Joseph (“May he [God] add”), first son with Rachel
      12. Benjamin (“Son of my right hand”), second son with Rachel
    Wk 3: David and Jonathan II (1 Samuel 20)
    1. Tell children the story of David and Jonathan Covenant or Watch with the children the a video of David and Jonathan Convenant
    2. Children should learn from the lesson a true friendship and how to make good friends.
    Wk 3: The story of David